Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-04-2012, 02:58 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


Hello everyone. I recently built a house 6 months ago and it's on a hill so i have a relatively LARGE crawlspace. One side I can jump up and down in and the opposite side requires a belly crawl. The builder had some husky white 6 mil vapor barrier covering the dirt per code requirements, but it's just sloppily laid in there pushed up against the walls ect.

I was going to seal all the seams with waterproof seam tape but the stuff is $33 a roll! from crawlspace concepts website. Thats insane considering I only have about $130 worth of vapor barrier itself down.

I was thinking about using the TYVEK tape, it's alot thinner, but who cares if the seams are overlapped and I am only creating a water tight seal.

I was curious if anyone else has used tyvek tape instead and if it works for an extended period of time?

DSMTUNER23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2012, 04:50 PM   #2
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 500
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


I'd suggest using the right tape, pricey or not. Tyvek tape isn't rated for use in a vapor barrier assembly, it's more of an air barrier. The plastic should be overlapped 6" minimum at all seams, then tape closed.

__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2012, 05:11 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


Quote:
Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse View Post
I'd suggest using the right tape, pricey or not. Tyvek tape isn't rated for use in a vapor barrier assembly, it's more of an air barrier. The plastic should be overlapped 6" minimum at all seams, then tape closed.
I was afraid that might be the case, but I thought tyvek was a vapor barrier also ir i wouldn't even have asked. maybe I'm wrong.
DSMTUNER23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2012, 05:19 PM   #4
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 500
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


Tyvek is considered a class III vapor retarder. 6 mil poly is a Class I. You really want to maintain your particular system as a Class I.
__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2012, 05:23 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


Quote:
Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse View Post
Tyvek is considered a class III vapor retarder. 6 mil poly is a Class I. You really want to maintain your particular system as a Class I.
Very helpful information. Thanks AG
DSMTUNER23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2012, 11:46 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


red tuck tape thats used to take vapour barrier seems indoors is made for just that sealing vapour barier together..less then 10 bucks a roll!!
notme76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 12:39 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Posts: 1,847
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


is the red tape suitable for outside? if there is any question, get the best tape you can that is for that material. "spendy" is arguable. it's a one-time expense, and compared to doing it again, and dealing w/ potential consequences of it coming apart, it is cheap. you can also goo the visqueen to the walls w/ tremco acoustical sealant, "black death". it is pretty sticky crap, and stays somewhat pliable. i used some, and after a year or two i pulled two test scraps glued w/ it apart; it stuck pretty tight, and was still fairly flexible. in 10 yrs? dunno, but several places on the big bad net say to use it along w/ tape.
jklingel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 01:55 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fl
Posts: 79
Rewards Points: 95
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


With a home, all the water vapor is created inside the home by people washing, cooking, breathing, sweating.

Outside the home the water vapor is created by the wind blowing over the ground and the sun.

Under a home there is no sun, little wind and very little chance of the water vapor rising from the ground. (there is little temperature difference)

The thing is that water vapor always moves from warm to cold or from an area of high pressure to one that's low.

Where a home is in use, the ground floor joists are always warmer than the ground, they are above the dew point, therefore no condensation on them, no mold, no wood rot.

The passing wind creates an area of low pressure above and down wind.

The natural movement of water vapor is outwards....your builder knew what he was doing.
Perry525 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2012, 09:53 PM   #9
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,749
Rewards Points: 2,114
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


red tuck tape is perfectly acceptable for vapor barrier. its expected by most inspectors in canada, however where your situation is for a crawl space i would combine it with caulking the seams of the vapor barrier with accoustical sealant . just be sure to run the bead of sealant several inches back from the edge of the joint to lessen the mess
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2012, 10:24 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NC
Posts: 24
Rewards Points: 10
Default

6 mil vapor barrier seams


You don't say what part of the country you're in...
I'm in NC, and even dry soil beneath the plastic releases moisture and the poly is there to hold it down. If it's a vented crawl outside humidity will come into the crawl without 'wind', AND it's more frequent than you know that the floor structure is cooler than the surrounding air, allowing water to condense right on the joists.
Back to your point, use the right tape for the job. Use landscape staples to pin the poly in place so it doesn't slide around.
I don't have a product recommendation, but I've also seen some laid and the seams are caulked - both at the wall and along the overlaps.

CrawlSpaceMoist is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
allure flooring coming up at seams & corners Mavis Flooring 22 08-20-2012 03:07 PM
TUB SEAMS: Comm'l. Acrylic Shower Panel + Drop-In Whirlpool watts up? Building & Construction 0 12-13-2011 10:12 AM
Flooring seams... stoked91 Building & Construction 3 07-09-2011 10:33 AM
filling and painting seams in Hardiplank denemante Painting 2 05-16-2011 04:03 PM
New Home - Wavy Drywall Seams Repair ?'s bmmitche Drywall & Plaster 2 07-19-2009 05:28 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.