DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   34x34 garage w/ attic trusses - 2 bedrooms (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/34x34-garage-w-attic-trusses-2-bedrooms-99728/)

2001FZ1 03-27-2011 11:16 AM

34x34 garage w/ attic trusses - 2 bedrooms
 
I'm in the planning stage of an addition and have a quick question about bonus room or attic trusses.

I'm looking at having a 34 x 34 garage and using bonus room trusses above it so I can add 2 bedrooms and bath. The trusses will be a 10/12 pitch. The above room will be 16ft wide. I was at Menards and got some quotes. An attic truss with a 34ft span and 16ft wide room built in is about $200. I was told they are engineered to hold the weight and can be on 24 inch centers. Seems like a lot of weight for each truss!!
Can these trusses be made so that no support is needed below? In other words, will I need a center post and support beam in the garage below supporting this room? The last thing I want is my flooring bouncing and causing cracks in the drywall.

Thanks!

Joe

tcleve4911 03-27-2011 11:33 AM

A couple of things......
34' is a pretty good span.
How tall is the bottom chord? 2x8 - 2x10?
2x6 exterior walls?
You shouldn't need any posts or girders.

If it were mine (and I tend to overbuild) I might consider 16" or 19-3/8 " o.c. , 16" adds approx $1600 to the truss price @ $200 each.
19-3/8" adds $800. That's your choice.
One thing I would definitely do ( and this will bring debate ) is strapping the bottom chord with 1x4's. This stiffens the bottom chords and locks them in place. You should strap at 16" o.c. even if you go with the trusses at 16,19-3/8 or 24"o.c.
This will help a lot in keeping your sheetrock in tact.

craig4 03-27-2011 01:22 PM

If you are buying trusses, are they not built by a truss plant. Tell them what you want and they will tell you what to do. It is their job. They will tell you what you need for bearing, posts, centers, strapping and anything else you want to know. If you don't want a post, and I wouldn't, tell them that and they can change the design with the click of a mouse. There is a reason their design programs cost over 10k. I've sat with a designer and changed a roof design. It's pretty cool to say the least. Go to a truss plant and tell them what you want, give them a few days, go back and tweek it if you have to. Ask them to show you the drawing on the computer. It's impressive for sure

2001FZ1 03-27-2011 01:26 PM

The bottom chord is a 2x10. I was thinking of doing 2x6 walls for better insulation. I assume this would help with supporting the load above too.

Can you explain "strapping the bottom chord"?

Also, if the trusses are 24 inches apart, doesn't there need to be support for the flooring between the trusses?

Thanks again!

Tizzer 03-27-2011 03:55 PM

Are you getting plans drawn up and approved for this project, or DIY? 34 foot trusses designed for room space with a 10/12 pitch will be both heavy and tall.
Probably piggy-backed- top part to be assembled afterwards.
Not to mention the use of a crane. Framing crew being involved with this? They'll know what strapping means.
The actual room floor plywood will be the bottom chord strapping with blocking at both sides of the floor edge. If using 3/4" plywood, I'd go with 19"o.c. as mentioned.
Where ever you get the trusses from, tell them everything you want and/or are using these for. If you want a future dormer window, tell them.

The truss package will arrive with a packet of installation instructions, ie: bracing, nailing,etc.
BTW., going 24" o.c. means you'll have to use H-clips for the roof sheathing too.

fulton 22175 03-27-2011 05:32 PM

number one i would go to a real lumber yard if i were you , i wouldnt trust menards to do anything like that , they make their owm trusses , number 2 let a real lumber yard look at your plans and they will send to the truss company to look at them , and they could give you a better idea on what to do , thats just what i would do

2001FZ1 03-27-2011 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tizzer (Post 618091)
Are you getting plans drawn up and approved for this project, or DIY? 34 foot trusses designed for room space with a 10/12 pitch will be both heavy and tall.
Probably piggy-backed- top part to be assembled afterwards.
Not to mention the use of a crane. Framing crew being involved with this? They'll know what strapping means.
The actual room floor plywood will be the bottom chord strapping with blocking at both sides of the floor edge. If using 3/4" plywood, I'd go with 19"o.c. as mentioned.
Where ever you get the trusses from, tell them everything you want and/or are using these for. If you want a future dormer window, tell them.

The truss package will arrive with a packet of installation instructions, ie: bracing, nailing,etc.
BTW., going 24" o.c. means you'll have to use H-clips for the roof sheathing too.

I am having plans drawn up. The construction crew is framing the garage, roofing and siding. I'll be doing a majority of the rest.
Thanks for the info!

tcleve4911 03-27-2011 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2001FZ1 (Post 617998)
Can you explain "strapping the bottom chord"?

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...g3vG3ICO8jU48p

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...xpZE84Nm3AxEdW

dalepres 03-27-2011 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tizzer (Post 618091)
Framing crew being involved with this? They'll know what strapping means.

I think the DIY answer is that strapping means 1x4's laid flat, running perpendicular to the trusses. Besides adding support for installing drywall, they potentially strengthen the trusses by preventing lateral bending of the bottom plate. Like others said, though, check with the truss company to make sure the design needs, would benefit, or won't be compromised. Probably the trusses are designed with 1/360 deflection. This would yield a 1.1" maximum deflection when the trusses are loaded to rating. You're building a bedroom, not a storeroom. I doubt you will notice any deflection. The trusses could be 1/240 if you're talking about roof or attic trusses. Then the deflection would be 1.7". Still that only applies if fully loaded. If you're really sensitive to the issue, you could ask the truss company to design to 1/480. Of course then you might end up with an upward bow (or camber) to your floor. Trusses are often built with a camber so that when the dead load is applied, the floor is near flat. In any case, you're probably going to be ok.

2001FZ1 03-28-2011 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fulton 22175 (Post 618146)
number one i would go to a real lumber yard if i were you , i wouldnt trust menards to do anything like that , they make their owm trusses , number 2 let a real lumber yard look at your plans and they will send to the truss company to look at them , and they could give you a better idea on what to do , thats just what i would do

I was told that the ones from Menards are made by Midwest Manufacturing. The spec sheets printed out were from them too.
http://www.midwestmanufacturing.com/...ential-Trusses

fulton 22175 03-28-2011 06:19 PM

yes thats thier truss company , menards is based out of EAU CLAIRE WISCONSIN, i used to work for menards back in the day , iam just trying to save you some headaches see what your framer says and see where he gets his lumber from , i have nothing against menards i just now how they operate is all , and its not the same as it was when i worked there everything is done off of computer nobody there nows there trade


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:19 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved