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Old 04-24-2013, 08:27 PM   #16
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2nd floor beam


What is it you're trying to do?

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Old 04-24-2013, 09:00 PM   #17
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2nd floor beam


joists can be lapped at the drop beam or load bearing wall, can be connected to a flush framed beam or can be continuous from outside wall to outside wall with either a beam or load bearing wall in between. if the span is 28' for example it would be a special order (in my area) to get solid sawn lumber joists that would span that far, I-joists could easily span that. Depends on what you're using as joists and what the lumber yard can provide. Also the long the solid sawn joist is the HEAVIER and more difficult it is to work with, and the more expense for the material normally.

if you're looking for a cookie cutter recipe that can be followed for every project I'm afraid you're out of luck. books will give you general information, experience and knowledge also come into play. Sometimes you have to make decisions based upon your knowledge and experience that may not match with what the book says.

all beams must transfer their loads to undisturbed natural material or engineered fill. Usually this is either foundation walls or footing that the columns bear upon. Excavation depth depends on the type of soil,and frost protection depth. Footings sometimes need to go past the frost line, depends on if they are outside or inside of the perimeter foundation. If interior usually they do to the same depth as the footings, exterior they will usually go to below the frost protection depth, unless they are close to the foundation walls. if the ground was disturbed from excavation for the perimeter foundation then they would need to go down to where you find undisturbed soils.

Hope this helps.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:19 PM   #18
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2nd floor beam


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Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
joists can be lapped at the drop beam or load bearing wall, can be connected to a flush framed beam or can be continuous from outside wall to outside wall with either a beam or load bearing wall in between. if the span is 28' for example it would be a special order (in my area) to get solid sawn lumber joists that would span that far, I-joists could easily span that. Depends on what you're using as joists and what the lumber yard can provide. Also the long the solid sawn joist is the HEAVIER and more difficult it is to work with, and the more expense for the material normally.

if you're looking for a cookie cutter recipe that can be followed for every project I'm afraid you're out of luck. books will give you general information, experience and knowledge also come into play. Sometimes you have to make decisions based upon your knowledge and experience that may not match with what the book says.

all beams must transfer their loads to undisturbed natural material or engineered fill. Usually this is either foundation walls or footing that the columns bear upon. Excavation depth depends on the type of soil,and frost protection depth. Footings sometimes need to go past the frost line, depends on if they are outside or inside of the perimeter foundation. If interior usually they do to the same depth as the footings, exterior they will usually go to below the frost protection depth, unless they are close to the foundation walls. if the ground was disturbed from excavation for the perimeter foundation then they would need to go down to where you find undisturbed soils.

Hope this helps.
Lets say you need to jack up part of the floor to level it. You would use jack posts with a beam under the joists and attached to the jack post. This is temporary. After the floor is leveled you would install wood columns or lally columns on footings below frost depth to support the beam?
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:21 PM   #19
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2nd floor beam


don't know, I'd have to see it first and figure out the best way to do the job .... what supports the floor you want to level?
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:30 PM   #20
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2nd floor beam


It is much better to say exactly what you are trying to do and ask how to do it instead of asking apparently random questions that amount to a framing 101 course. It becomes very frustrating to those trying to help you. Reading up on the basic theory of residential framing will help your confidence level going into a major structural change to your home. Once you understand how the whole thing works it will be easy. Just do the math.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:34 PM   #21
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don't know, I'd have to see it first and figure out the best way to do the job .... what supports the floor you want to level?
This is just a question its not something i need to do. I just would like to get an understand of how a jack post comes into play. The jack posts have to attach to a beam, right? Once you get it leveled you add permanent posts, correct? Are you in favor of lally columns or wood posts? I know wood shouldn't be in contact with concrete though cause of possible moisture issues.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:57 PM   #22
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As jagans said, this is a forum for others to help you with specific jobs you're currently or planning on doing. You are repeatedly asking questions that would be answered very early on in a framing book. If you have interest in the topic I suggest you do some basic reading and then come back w/ specific questions. Thanks
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Old 04-24-2013, 11:23 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by markharmon View Post
This is just a question its not something i need to do. I just would like to get an understand of how a jack post comes into play. The jack posts have to attach to a beam, right? Once you get it leveled you add permanent posts, correct? Are you in favor of lally columns or wood posts? I know wood shouldn't be in contact with concrete though cause of possible moisture issues.
jacking if done incorrectly for the actual conditions found can lead to damage to floors, walls and beams .... this is the part where knowledge and experience comes into play that I mentioned before.

there is no typical one-way fits for doing this, it is based upon the actual existing conditions found and evaluated by someone knowledgeable and experienced at doing this type of work

make sense??

as stated if you have a particular situation then ask a direct question, if you're trying to learn go to the public library and check out some books of framing and building construction.
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Old 04-24-2013, 11:29 PM   #24
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Are you in favor of lally columns or wood posts?
I'm a fan of Schedule 40 Standard Pipe Columns (steel), not a fan of lally columns (thin steel columns filled with concrete).
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Old 04-25-2013, 01:03 AM   #25
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Want to see some beams? Click on the link in my signature......

Lets see...one of them is an 11.25x5.25 20' long.....another one is 11.25x3.5 18' long....that one sits on top of an existing wall........then I have a couple that are 11.25x7 and about 14' long.....

And then I have my steel beam....6x10 and about 14' long...with some custom buckets on the end made out of 1/4" plate steel....

Here is one of the pics....

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Old 04-25-2013, 04:15 AM   #26
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Is this thread about an actual building project, or is it just concerned with theoretical aspects of construction? It can only result in vague speculation without knowledge of spans, loadings and room layouts etc.
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Old 04-25-2013, 06:08 AM   #27
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2nd floor beam


I think the first tony, but being asked as the latter
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:00 AM   #28
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Want to see some beams? Click on the link in my signature......

Lets see...one of them is an 11.25x5.25 20' long.....another one is 11.25x3.5 18' long....that one sits on top of an existing wall........then I have a couple that are 11.25x7 and about 14' long.....

And then I have my steel beam....6x10 and about 14' long...with some custom buckets on the end made out of 1/4" plate steel....

Here is one of the pics....

Why do you have so many beams? Where are the joists?
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:08 AM   #29
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2nd floor beam


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don't know, I'd have to see it first and figure out the best way to do the job .... what supports the floor you want to level?
This is one answer I could not find online for some reason. I guess after this I'll stop bothering you guys. For a house with a second floor that does not cover the same area as the first floor. An example would be like you have a house 1200 sq ft and the upstairs is only 600 sq ft. The rim joist for the 2nd floor is obviously not going to go around the entire first floor perimeter. So, basically three quarters of the rim joist will sit on an exterior wall supported by foundation but what about the other part of the rim joist? Does the other wall have to supported all the way to the foundation to support the remaining rim joist? Thanks guys....sorry for bugging you.
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:14 AM   #30
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2nd floor beam


are you positive the 2nd floor joists do not extend out to the 1st floor walls? my second floor living space is smaller than the first floor, but my 2nd floor joists extend out to the perimeter of the first floor walls. my roof sits on the second floor deck and has a few dormers that creates sufficient space for the bedrooms.

got some photos of your home from the exterior?

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