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Old 04-24-2013, 11:12 AM   #1
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2nd floor beam


when you have a 2 story house and obviously the joists can only span so far until you need vertical support. How is that usually constructed for a second floor? I supposed a flush beam and column on the second floor?

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Old 04-24-2013, 11:24 AM   #2
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2nd floor beam


Support the joist-ends on either a LVL beam or (if wide area and long span) a steel beam. Any beam will of course need adequate support onto the walls.
A vague answer to a vague question!

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Old 04-24-2013, 11:26 AM   #3
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2nd floor beam


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Support the joist-ends on either a LVL beam or (if wide area and long span) a steel beam. Any beam will of course need adequate support onto the walls.
A vague answer to a vague question!
On a 2 story house will there always be a beam or sometimes just a load bearing wall to support the joists?
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Old 04-24-2013, 03:36 PM   #4
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2nd floor beam


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Originally Posted by markharmon View Post

On a 2 story house will there always be a beam or sometimes just a load bearing wall to support the joists?
Normally 2nd story load bearing walls are placed directly above 1st story load bearing walls to carry the load down to the beams & columns in the basement.
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Old 04-24-2013, 04:14 PM   #5
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2nd floor beam


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Normally 2nd story load bearing walls are placed directly above 1st story load bearing walls to carry the load down to the beams & columns in the basement.
That I understand but on a 2nd floor do you not usually have a beam? Is it normally just a load bearing wall?
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Old 04-24-2013, 04:29 PM   #6
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2nd floor beam


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Originally Posted by markharmon View Post

That I understand but on a 2nd floor do you not usually have a beam? Is it normally just a load bearing wall?
Yes usually it's a wall. Only time you need a beam is if you don't have a wall. 1st floors will be more likely to have beams as they are more likely to have an open floor plan. Any time you choose to get rid of a load bearing wall it gets replaced w/ a beam. 2nd floors are usually more partitioned, ie. bedrooms, bathrooms, etc. so you get more walls than beams.
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:13 PM   #7
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2nd floor beam


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Yes usually it's a wall. Only time you need a beam is if you don't have a wall. 1st floors will be more likely to have beams as they are more likely to have an open floor plan. Any time you choose to get rid of a load bearing wall it gets replaced w/ a beam. 2nd floors are usually more partitioned, ie. bedrooms, bathrooms, etc. so you get more walls than beams.
So, far long 2nd story floor joists there is only so far they can span before they need vertical support, i.e, beam. Instead of using a beam and column on the second floor a load bearing wall is used and then that load is transferred directly below it to the first floor and to basement and footings?
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:27 PM   #8
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2nd floor beam


Pretty much yes. Ever look at a framing book? I got this one off Amazon awhile ago, they're selling for about $4.50 used w/ shipping...

http://www.amazon.com/House-Framing-...=house+framing

...not a bad book to have sitting around. I find myself picking it up from time to time and reading certain parts.
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Old 04-24-2013, 05:34 PM   #9
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2nd floor beam


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Pretty much yes. Ever look at a framing book? I got this one off Amazon awhile ago, they're selling for about $4.50 used w/ shipping...

http://www.amazon.com/House-Framing-...=house+framing

...not a bad book to have sitting around. I find myself picking it up from time to time and reading certain parts.
So, I am pretty much correct what I said or not really?
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:09 PM   #10
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2nd floor beam


joists can only span so far. typically there are two ways of supporting the interior ends of floor joists, with a beam or with a load bearing wall. If the choice is a beam then it is usually either flushed framed or dropped under the joists. all loads must be accounted for and brought down to the foundation.
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:22 PM   #11
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2nd floor beam


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So, I am pretty much correct what I said or not really?
Yes. Like GB said, it's either beam or wall depending on the layout. If there's a wall then no beam is needed. If you want the area to remain open then you use a beam. I think you got it a few posts ago...
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:25 PM   #12
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2nd floor beam


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Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
joists can only span so far. typically there are two ways of supporting the interior ends of floor joists, with a beam or with a load bearing wall. If the choice is a beam then it is usually either flushed framed or dropped under the joists. all loads must be accounted for and brought down to the foundation.
for a second story joists do they usually span the entire distance wall to wall with a bearing wall in the middle? Or, for instance, on a show I saw the joists from one end of the rim joist span to a point on a wall plate and then another set of joists were placed right next to the other and then they spanned to the other rim joist. Does this sound correct?
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:26 PM   #13
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2nd floor beam


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Yes. Like GB said, it's either beam or wall depending on the layout. If there's a wall then no beam is needed. If you want the area to remain open then you use a beam. I think you got it a few posts ago...
Sometimes I see a double up joist running perpendicular to the other joists then the joist continuing from the other side of the doubled up joist. Is that considered a type of flush beam?
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:39 PM   #14
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2nd floor beam


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Sometimes I see a double up joist running perpendicular to the other joists then the joist continuing from the other side of the doubled up joist. Is that considered a type of flush beam?
Yes sir.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:57 PM   #15
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2nd floor beam


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Yes sir.
But a flush beam is in no way as strong as a drop beam, right? When you have a beam column support I know it has to be placed on footings. Do those footings need to go past the frost line?

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