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Old 04-20-2009, 09:05 AM   #1
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2"x6" framing question.


I am building a shop and considering using 2"x6" framing on the exterior walls instead of 2"x4" for insulation purposes. I understand that with 2"x6"s I can put them on 24" centers. I am thinking though that if I do that, my interior wall covering will have to be stiff enough to not bow. I am planning to use a plywood type interior wall covering so that I can easily attach things to the walls, so if I want to use something thin, say 3/8" plywood, wouldn't I need to put my 2"x6"s on 16" centers to make the interior walls more stiff?
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:31 PM   #2
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2"x6" framing question.


I think 3/8" Plywood would span 24" pretty well and give you additional shear strength. Be sure to stagger all the joints just like you would drywall.

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Old 04-20-2009, 01:06 PM   #3
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2"x6" framing question.


I know money is a little tighter these days than it has been, but I suspect it's not all that destitute at your house right now if you are building a shop. We're only talking about five more studs per 20 feet of wall when you go 16" instead of 24".

Personally, I would go with 16" and use at least 1/2", and try to get T&G to keep the edges aligned between studs. (or "cleat" the backs of the ply joints) You may find that 3/8" is hardly sufficient to support the things you may choose to mount on the walls without causing the plywood to bow from the additional weight.

Sure, you're going to put maybe an additional $300 into the building, but I honestly believe, in the long run, it will be well worth it to you.

Building your own shop is no time to get stingy.
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Last edited by Willie T; 04-20-2009 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 04-20-2009, 01:11 PM   #4
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2"x6" framing question.


I went with 2x6 on my addition & 16" OC
24" OC does not give enough support IMO
And the added expense is not that much
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