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Old 08-31-2008, 12:50 AM   #1
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1890 settlement


We have a house that was built in 1890 and has some settlement issues. The footprint of the oldest part of the house approximately 25' X 25'. The main triple beams are in poor shape. I want to replace or reinforce those triple beams with triple 2 x 12's. I don't believe it would be wise to jack up with my house since it replacement windows that are only a few years old. I fear they would be thrown out of square or broke in the process. So, I just want to stop the movement. I need to know how large of footings and how many lolly columns to use. I was thinking of 2' x 2' for the footings and the columns one on each end and 2 equally spaced in the middle about. That would put them about 8' apart for a total of four. My wife feels that this is overkill but I'd rather over build it that under build it. Thank You!

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Old 08-31-2008, 11:55 AM   #2
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1890 settlement


24x24" is a pretty small pad footing, but it all depends on your soil's bearing capacity, the reinforcement of the pad, and the depth of the pad....Not to mention the actual live and dead loads on the beam and each individual column. If the footings are in an unheated crawlspace, they need to be dug below your region's design frost depth.

There are just so many variables that I cannont offer you structural design assistance in good conscience. No way we can determine the loads that the beam is under without a thorough review of the home's structure. This is a job for a structural engineer, which would give you the answers you need for a fairly reasonable fee (usually $300'ish here).

I will say that whatever improvements you make to the beam are better than what you have right now.

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Old 08-31-2008, 05:37 PM   #3
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1890 settlement


Sorry I meant 2' x 2' x 2' fir the footing. Its not in an unheated crawlspace, It's your typical stone 100 yr old basment with a concrete floor. The home instector said that stuctural engineers cost like $600 in New England. I could have the job done and have $$ left for a house warming party!
I'm considering using those wood I-Beams, (can't think of the correct name of them at the moment) instead of the triple 2x12's

I totally agree something is better than nothing.
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:29 AM   #4
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1890 settlement


Quote:
Originally Posted by ozzyu812 View Post
Sorry I meant 2' x 2' x 2' fir the footing. Its not in an unheated crawlspace, It's your typical stone 100 yr old basment with a concrete floor. The home instector said that stuctural engineers cost like $600 in New England. I could have the job done and have $$ left for a house warming party!
I'm considering using those wood I-Beams, (can't think of the correct name of them at the moment) instead of the triple 2x12's

I totally agree something is better than nothing.
Thekctermite is correct, but you better rethink about using the I beams as Girders. or were you thinking of LVL's BOB. $600.00 is not bad. here ,when I call my engineer he charges start from the time he leaves his house to the time he returns.( port to port) what a racket!.
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Old 09-01-2008, 12:46 PM   #5
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1890 settlement


I-joists and 2x12's can't be used interchangeably for use as headers and beams. If you're going to go off on this unguided by an engineer, use PSL or LVL beams, not I-joists.

This isn't the time to try to save a few hundred bucks.
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