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Old 04-15-2010, 10:01 AM   #16
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12-10-2010 - [s] - question regarding dry-lining stone wall house.jpg


You are probably correct. Like I said, this is for NYC. But we have all climates here too, not as extreme as you guys, but we get flooding, moisture problems, heavy rains, etc..

Can you post up a picture of your house and problem area? I am really curious what it looks like exactly.

Have you though about addressing this problem from the outside? I mean protect the walls with something to reduce the amount of water actually touching the walls. Siding, maybe repointing?

No matter what, I still say spend the extra $$$ and go with metal studs. They will be a breeze to install, will never rot, twist, and moisture doesn't really affect them.

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Old 04-15-2010, 12:40 PM   #17
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Here's an article on spray-foam applications and insulation on a building here in Montreal. Has a few ideas on what to look for...

http://www.cebq.org/documents/Insula...ls-BEF_000.pdf

Also: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...s/?full_view=1
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Old 04-15-2010, 03:43 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Here's an article on spray-foam applications and insulation on a building here in Montreal. Has a few ideas on what to look for...

http://www.cebq.org/documents/Insula...ls-BEF_000.pdf

Also: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...s/?full_view=1

I love buildingscience.com.

And after reviewing both articles. Expandable Foam insulation is still the best. lol.

peakpilgrim, I coppied summary from buildingscience.com below.
This is basically the process that I recommended, but with an extra air gap for further protection.
Summary

Insulating load bearing masonry buildings on the interior in a cold climate is usually required to meet human comfort requirements, environmental goals, and cost targets. Many such interior retrofits have already been successfully completed in cold climates by the use of a continuous insulation level combined with attention to airtightening and exterior rain shedding details.
The use of semi-permeable foam insulation in contact with the back of the existing masonry is the most common successful strategy for interior insulation retrofits with a track record of success. This method also has the advantage of being one of the most practical to achieve under field conditions. The use of air and vapor-permeable batt or semi-rigid insulation is our experience and analysis a risky solution that cannot be recommended.
To ensure that the goals of comfort, energy-efficiency, and durability are met, windows and roofs must also be included in the building retrofit strategy. Major improvements in the performance of these two building enclosure components can significantly enhance the overall building performance.
To further reduce the likelihood of moisture problems in the building enclosure, the mechanical systems should be designed and commissioned to avoid any positive pressurization of the building. Humidity also needs to be controlled, particularly in cold weather.
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Old 04-16-2010, 11:21 AM   #19
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Hi CC & Slick Thankyou very much, again, for your suggestions. Buildingscience.com looks a very interesting website. I must have a look at all this in more detail.
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Old 04-18-2010, 01:17 AM   #20
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Rising Damp.

You from England?
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:42 AM   #21
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Skuce,
Don't you suffer from rising damp in Canada, or is it known by a different name?
There are some people here who think it's a myth.
http://www.diynot.com/forums//viewtopic.php?t=34549
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:20 AM   #22
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Ha! good one, Stuart!

I lived in the UK and Scotland for 3 years and don't think the UK has their own brand of science that deals with rising damp that we haven't got as well. It may have to do with the average age of construction and the methods but if we had as old buildings as there are in the UK, we'd have rising damp too. We just see it as water management.

For sure this has become a problem in the last century as we both tightened up our homes. peakpilgrim is a case in point: her home in Galway Ireland was built so that the exterior walls were to be kept contantly ventilated with outdoor air, so that insulating it on the inside is giving her more problems than she bargained for. Not her fault, just the age of the house.

Capillary action and evaporation is what it is known by generically...generally, water management.
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Old 04-23-2010, 10:55 AM   #23
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We don't have a rising damp problem here at all (unless you built on a bog...but that's a whole other issue. lol)

We mainly only have to deal with run-off here, or underground clay beds making rivers. Especially in the spring when the ice is still in the ground, but there is surface water flooding. That is all just basic water management though.

We don't have companies here that try and sell you damp proof course retros for brick buildings or anything. Water just goes straight down here (for the most part)


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