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-   -   Is 1000lbs too much weight on a typical floor? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/1000lbs-too-much-weight-typical-floor-170774/)

Red Squirrel 02-01-2013 06:59 PM

Is 1000lbs too much weight on a typical floor?
 
I got all my supplies to start on my basement and near the end I was getting so tired (and running out of room in the basement) so I just put them in the kitchen for now. The window wall is an outside wall (obviously) and the door wall is the end of the floor, so the beam is there.

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-1545-dsc04867.JPG

Is this too much weight? Or am I ok to leave it there? (probably a week or so at least).

It only really crossed my mind till I was done, that yeah, that's a lot of weight in one area.

md2lgyk 02-01-2013 07:27 PM

What is that stuff? And how do you know it's 1000 pounds??

gregzoll 02-01-2013 07:31 PM

Sounds like you have a wrestling team or a couple of Sumos up there.

Red Squirrel 02-01-2013 07:32 PM

Dricore. 1000 lbs per skid according to Home Depot's site. (that's 1 skid there) Though if that counts the skid itself then maybe deduct like, 20 lbs maybe?

Been there for a few days, I put a level on the floor and it's still straight.

joed 02-01-2013 07:55 PM

I don't think it is problem. 1000 pounds is equivalent to 5 200 pound adults.

bbo 02-01-2013 08:48 PM

tiresome carrying all that stuff huh? I carried 750 sq feet to my basement myself. I think i need 5 more pieces, can i get some from you?

Red Squirrel 02-01-2013 09:43 PM

It's possible I may have extras. Got 2 skids (that's just one, got another in the basement).

The dricore was actually not the most tiring part. The lumber was.

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-1543-dsc04862.JPG


Was too tired to do the last skid, and I had fun getting to it the next morning. :eek:

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-1544-dsc04864.JPG

I figure I did about 80 trips total to carry all that. Going back and fort between -20C and +20C (which eventually went to +10 haha)

GBrackins 02-01-2013 11:42 PM

what are the size, spacing and span of your floor joists?

Red Squirrel 02-02-2013 12:35 AM

1 Attachment(s)
16" on center, appears to be 2x10's. Span between wall to the beam is about 12 feet. That cinder block wall (in the attached pic) represents the outside wall in my other pic. The stuff is around where that 1x6 middle plank is.

I'm thinking it's fine, but just want reassurance.

Oh and here's an older pic, but it shows the beam at the end on the cinder blocks.

http://gal.redsquirrel.me/thumbs/lrg-502-dsc01685.JPG

Appears to be 2x10's, 3 of em put together.

profcolli 02-02-2013 03:37 AM

RedSquirrel, you seem to have most of the DriCore upside down. The instructions are to place the panels with the membrane facing down for 24 hours in the room they are to be installed in.

The plastic membrane can unglue and become unstable when you store them upside down (I made the same mistake and noticed many panels had the edges staring to curl up from the glue separating - turning them the right way fixed it, as the weight of the panels above compressed them - somewhat counter-intuitive, as one would assume that the weight of the panels would work either way).

I wouldn't think the weight on your floor would be a problem - one floating Dricore panel can support 1,000lbs a square foot, a properly structured floor should be stronger than that.

Maintenance 6 02-02-2013 09:39 AM

I doubt it would be a problem unless you left it there for a long time. It will give you plenty of warning before it goes anywhere, like a significant sag and some groaning when you walk by.

Daniel Holzman 02-02-2013 10:25 AM

You already did the experiment, and the floor did not fail. Wooden floors that are overloaded typically fail immediately. Floors that are loaded will creep over many years, nothing for you to worry about there.

For future reference, if you want to do the analysis first, calculate the pounds per square foot of the load. You have 1000 lbs, it looks like the dricore is 2 ft square, so you would have 8 square feet total, or 125 psf. This is about three times the normal rating for a floor. The good news is that due to factors of safety and the properties of wood, you can typically load a floor to as much as four times its code based allowable load without inducing immediate failure. Next time you may want to limit your overload to 80 psf rather than taking a chance, or you can calculate the actual load limit on your floor based on the actual dimensions and properties of your framing.

dumbengineer 02-02-2013 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 1107547)
I don't think it is problem. 1000 pounds is equivalent to 5 200 pound adults.


this is really a bad advice here. point load is very different from load spread over certain area.

Red Squirrel 02-02-2013 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by profcolli (Post 1107701)
RedSquirrel, you seem to have most of the DriCore upside down. The instructions are to place the panels with the membrane facing down for 24 hours in the room they are to be installed in.

The plastic membrane can unglue and become unstable when you store them upside down (I made the same mistake and noticed many panels had the edges staring to curl up from the glue separating - turning them the right way fixed it, as the weight of the panels above compressed them - somewhat counter-intuitive, as one would assume that the weight of the panels would work either way).

I wouldn't think the weight on your floor would be a problem - one floating Dricore panel can support 1,000lbs a square foot, a properly structured floor should be stronger than that.

That's how they come in the skid, they alternate between upside down and right side up, I was just taking them in "chunks" and repiling them. They will be going in the basement for a bit once I cleared some stuff though. I just ran out of room, still need a big enough area to build my walls. Idealy before I install I should probably spread them out or at least pile them all right side up for a bit.

Red Squirrel 02-02-2013 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dumbengineer (Post 1107920)
this is really a bad advice here. point load is very different from load spread over certain area.

And 5 200 pound adults probably wont stand around there for a week at a time. :laughing:


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