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Old 07-31-2015, 09:48 AM   #1
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working with HOT wires ?


i AM NOT going to do this. but i was wondering. if one had to work on live wires. what gloves would do the job ?

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Old 07-31-2015, 10:03 AM   #2
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working with HOT wires ?


Linemen's. Liners with leather over glove.

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Last edited by brric; 07-31-2015 at 10:05 AM.
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Old 07-31-2015, 10:03 AM   #3
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working with HOT wires ?


They make special gloves for this. Any electrical supply house should have them
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Old 07-31-2015, 10:26 AM   #4
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working with HOT wires ?


For the most part, there is no reason to work a circuit hot. Obviously troubleshooting needs to be done hot sometimes, but repair and replacement does not.

I used to do work hot because I cared about how convenient it might be to a customer. But these days I don't care how many lights or computers need to be turned off, their convenience isn't work my life.
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Old 07-31-2015, 01:02 PM   #5
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working with HOT wires ?


The post is pretty vague, and difficult to understand. "What gloves would do the job?" What job is this? Protect you from getting shocked in the event you touched a live wire while grounded? Your gloves will do nothing to protect your face from arc flash in the unfortunate event you create a fault, easy to do when working hot. If your real question is "What protective gear and training do I need to safely work on hot equipment", well the answer is a whole lot more than a pair of gloves. Start with live voltage training, move on to understanding arc flash protection, then plan on purchasing a lot of arc flash gear (expensive).

The short answer is that no DIY'er without special training and equipment should ever work hot. If it is essential that the work be done hot, you need a specially trained electrician for the work, with a lot more than a pair of gloves for protection.
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Old 07-31-2015, 01:12 PM   #6
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working with HOT wires ?


Electrical PPE also needs special care. Here is a brief article on it.
http://m.ecmweb.com/content/take-care-your-ppe
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Old 07-31-2015, 01:43 PM   #7
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working with HOT wires ?


Depending on the type of hot work, gloves can actually increase the hazard, as can any other type of Personal Protective Equipment.

Every situation is different, blindly applying regulations to hot work usually results in increased hazard.
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Old 07-31-2015, 02:50 PM   #8
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working with HOT wires ?


Protective gloves come in different voltage ratings. It is not a one glove works for all.
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Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
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Old 08-01-2015, 07:26 AM   #9
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working with HOT wires ?


ok, let me refrace this question. how thick of a material, rubber or leather, would it take to not get shocked by 120v ?

again, there is NO other motivation behind this question, take it at face value.
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Old 08-01-2015, 09:39 AM   #10
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working with HOT wires ?


Gloves………..

Like trying to talk with a mouth FULL of food.
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Old 08-01-2015, 09:53 AM   #11
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working with HOT wires ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fix'n it View Post
ok, let me refrace this question. how thick of a material, rubber or leather, would it take to not get shocked by 120v ?

again, there is NO other motivation behind this question, take it at face value.
Refer to NFPA70e and ATSM D120

Last edited by KStatefan; 08-01-2015 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 08-01-2015, 03:36 PM   #12
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working with HOT wires ?


Quote:
ok, let me refrace this question. how thick of a material, rubber or leather, would it take to not get shocked by 120v ?
That's a dangerous question. You do not want to be working with minimum thicknesses. First thing to go wrong and you get zapped.

The 500v gloves are proof tested at 2500vac. (There is also a vdc test, but I do not remember the voltage.)

You want plenty of safety margin in your gloves or rubber sleeves, blankets,etc.

You need to remember when talking about 120v that if you have 2 legs, you are dealing with 240v.
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:59 AM   #13
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working with HOT wires ?


The direct answer is that a GOOD pair of dry leather gloves will generally protect you from 120v.
To be proper, you need a set of 1000v rated secondary gloves (rubber) and leather protectors.
But nothing can protect you from ignorance. There's much much more than gloves needed to keep you from getting shocked, flashed or electrocuted.

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