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Old 04-26-2009, 06:25 PM   #16
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You can bury UF, as long as it's 24 inches down. I think your subpanel installation was a touch too much for your level of experience. I always leave stuff like that to an electrician, and recommend others do as well unless they are a 'qualified person' as per the NEC. I feel comfortable doing some things, but nothing like that. Know your limits, and all that.

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Old 04-26-2009, 06:29 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunici View Post
As for the non-GFCI outlets in the kitchen, they were not protected. The one circuit (#10 breaker) had three outlets, none of which were GFCI. They are more than 6' from the sink,
This was code complaint when you house was built. There is nothing wrong with upgrading now.



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but the fridge is on one of those outlets and it has a water line for the ice maker.
No matter. It still does not need GFI protection, nor would I want it.



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The third kitchen circuit (#1 breaker) consists of one outlet on the north wall plus one outlet in the hallway. I suppose that side of the kitchen could be declared the dining room, but I replaced it with a GFCI anyway. I've got a freezer plugged into it, so its kitchen to me.
Just becasue it's kitchen does not mean it requires or needs GFI protection.
The kitchen, DR, pantry, nook, etc., are all considered the same area and follow the same rules. Only counter receptacles require GFI protection.



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The fourth circuit (#2 breaker) had two GFCIs plus the switched disposal outlet under the sink. The disposal outlet was not GFCI nor was it on the load side of the existing GFCI.
Now this is an issue. Not the GFI. A disposal does NOT need GFI protection. Thing is the disposal is not allowed on with the counter receptacles. Not a huge deal though, mainly a convenience issue not a safety issue.
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Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
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Old 04-26-2009, 07:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
This was code complaint when you house was built. There is nothing wrong with upgrading now.



No matter. It still does not need GFI protection, nor would I want it.



Just becasue it's kitchen does not mean it requires or needs GFI protection.
The kitchen, DR, pantry, nook, etc., are all considered the same area and follow the same rules. Only counter receptacles require GFI protection.



Now this is an issue. Not the GFI. A disposal does NOT need GFI protection. Thing is the disposal is not allowed on with the counter receptacles. Not a huge deal though, mainly a convenience issue not a safety issue.
These are interesting observations, and led me to take a tour of my own kitchen and it's receptacles. First, it was all wired pre-1990. When I moved in, there was no GFCI protection anywhere. I replaced the receptacle two feet from the sink, but left the one alone on the counter top four feet further down from the sink. NEC 2008 says GFCI is required:

210.8 (6) Kitchens — where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop surfaces

So, for a 'new' kitchen, yes, GFCI protection is required. However, if an installation was code compliant at the time of installation, it is still code compliant. You (as the home owner) can certainly upgrade the level of protection, but you aren't required to.
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Old 04-26-2009, 08:27 PM   #19
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So the neutrals in that switch box are screwy. That's what it looked like to me but I couldn't tell for sure. I'd at least fix that.

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