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Old 10-26-2008, 08:47 AM   #1
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Wiring for OTR Microwave


Hi. I have a few questions about wiring for a new over the range microwave.


1. The directions for installation say to put an outlet in the cabinet above the range. What about putting the outlet ABOVE THE CABINET instead of inside it? Are there any codes for keeping an outlet any distance from a ceiling? It seems like this would be the best.

2. The directions say "the outlet should be on a circuit dedicated to the microwave 120v, 60Hz., AC only, with a 20ampere fused electrical supply." As someone has pointed out, I don't know if "should be" means that the dedicated circuit is recommended or required. Any thoughts?
3. Ok, one more. I will be using just enough wire to reach between the old outlet and new one, but is it necessary to secure the new wire to the studs in some way to prevent someone from hitting it when screwing into the wall in the future? If necessary, how is this done without ripping out wall all along the way between outlets?

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Old 10-26-2008, 09:16 AM   #2
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Wiring for OTR Microwave


1) First, cCheck the code in your city/county area. Putting the outlet inside the cabinet hides the outlet, offering a cleaner appearance. Many homes have cabinets that butt up to the ceiling or boxed in area. I don't know about this, but it might be safer to have the outlet lower on the wall...if you have a second floor with a bathroom, and there was a leak causing water to flood the second floor, water could be absorbed into the walls and if contact is made with the live wires, when you clean up the flood upstairs, there could be very harmful results.

2. If you have a dedicated circuit, then operating other appliances at the same time the nuker is running won't strain the circuit or blow the breaker.

3. Again, check code in your area. You'll have to get inside the wall anyway to install the box and run wire. Drilling a hole in each stud and running the wire through the hole, will keep the wire out of the way. Check with your local homeimprove store for possible special drill bits for this.

Hope this helps. I'm not an electrician, just a little experienced in renovating work.

Terrell

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Old 10-26-2008, 09:41 AM   #3
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Wiring for OTR Microwave


i had to hide an outlet in a cabinet, the inspector had no problems with it here.

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Old 10-26-2008, 11:17 AM   #4
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Wiring for OTR Microwave


I would follow the manufacturers instructions. Sounds good to me and perfectly acceptable.
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Old 10-26-2008, 02:21 PM   #5
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Wiring for OTR Microwave


Quote:
Originally Posted by merriam View Post
1. ...Are there any codes for keeping an outlet any distance from a ceiling?...
No. A receptacle mounted up high near a ceiling is ok...just couldn't be counted as one of the 'required general use receptacles' for that room.

Quote:
Originally Posted by merriam View Post
2. The directions say "the outlet should be on a circuit dedicated to the microwave 120v, 60Hz., AC only, with a 20ampere fused electrical supply." As someone has pointed out, I don't know if "should be" means that the dedicated circuit is recommended or required. Any thoughts?

"Should be" is a recommendation, not a requirement. "Shall be" is wording used in the NEC to mean 'must be'. My personal recommendation is to put it on it's own circuit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by merriam View Post
3. Ok, one more. I will be using just enough wire to reach between the old outlet and new one, but is it necessary to secure the new wire to the studs in some way to prevent someone from hitting it when screwing into the wall in the future? If necessary, how is this done without ripping out wall all along the way between outlets?

In your case, you don't need to secure the cable in the wall. The NEC allows the cable to be fished in the wall without having to secure it.
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