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kennykenny 08-25-2008 12:07 PM

Wiring a new outlet advice
 
I am adding a new outdoor outlet on my house. I am planning on wiring from an existing interior outlet. Upon removing the interior outlet I notice that there are two white wires(one each) on the non copper screws and two black wires(one each) on the copper screws on the sides of the outlet. When I have added extra outlets in the past, I have always had one set of the outlet screws open and I have just wired accordingly. Since all of the wires are being used, can I just pigtail the wires and go from there? For my own purposes, why might the wires have two white on one side of the outlet and two on the other? Isn't it normally one on each side? Thanks!

CowboyAndy 08-25-2008 12:32 PM

Yes, you will need to pigtail.

The reason there are 4 wires (2 bl and 2 w) is 1 set is for the incoming power, and 2 feed another device down the line.

Jim Port 08-25-2008 12:32 PM

The receptacles with 2 wires on each side are middle of a run. Power comes inon one cable and continues out to other parts of the circuit on the other cable.

Using a pigtail is the proper method to continue the wiring.

Note that bathroom, laundry and kitchen/dining receptacle circuits cannot be extended for exterior use.

comp1911 08-25-2008 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kennykenny (Post 151582)
I am adding a new outdoor outlet on my house. I am planning on wiring from an existing interior outlet. Upon removing the interior outlet I notice that there are two white wires(one each) on the non copper screws and two black wires(one each) on the copper screws on the sides of the outlet. When I have added extra outlets in the past, I have always had one set of the outlet screws open and I have just wired accordingly. Since all of the wires are being used, can I just pigtail the wires and go from there? For my own purposes, why might the wires have two white on one side of the outlet and two on the other? Isn't it normally one on each side? Thanks!


Typical installation would have all of the hots (blacks) wire nutted together with a single wire "pigtail" also under the wire nut to hook up to the recep. Same on the neutrals (whites) and the grounds (bare).

Done this way if you lose a recep you don't lose the rest of the circuit.

kennykenny 08-25-2008 12:57 PM

JimPort---why is it that bathroom, laundry,kitchen/dining receptacle circuits cannot be extended for exterior use? That is what I was hoping to do. The receptacle is in the dining area below a window with nothing plugged into it and never used. Is it a code or safety thing?

jbfan 08-25-2008 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kennykenny (Post 151594)
JimPort---why is it that bathroom, laundry,kitchen/dining receptacle circuits cannot be extended for exterior use? That is what I was hoping to do. The receptacle is in the dining area below a window with nothing plugged into it and never used. Is it a code or safety thing?

It is a code violation.

220/221 08-25-2008 05:32 PM

Quote:

It is a code violation.
Reference??

SD515 08-25-2008 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 220/221 (Post 151693)
Reference??

Sml Appl (Kitch/Dining) 210.11(C)(1) which refers to 210.52(B). [No other outlets 210.52(B)(2)]

Laundry 210.11(C)(2)

Bath 210.11(C)(3)

CowboyAndy 08-26-2008 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by comp1911 (Post 151590)
Typical installation would have all of the hots (blacks) wire nutted together with a single wire "pigtail" also under the wire nut to hook up to the recep. Same on the neutrals (whites) and the grounds (bare).

Done this way if you lose a recep you don't lose the rest of the circuit.

BTW, it is not REQUIRED to pigtail...


just sayin...

:whistling2:

Quote:

Originally Posted by kennykenny (Post 151594)
JimPort---why is it that bathroom, laundry,kitchen/dining receptacle circuits cannot be extended for exterior use? That is what I was hoping to do. The receptacle is in the dining area below a window with nothing plugged into it and never used. Is it a code or safety thing?

Basiclly, the code says that those areas (kitchen, bath and laundry) are required to have certain circuits, and that they CANNOT serve other areas unless specified, such as a bathroom can supply another bathroom, or SABC in a kitchen can supply the dining rooom.

comp1911 08-26-2008 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 151903)
BTW, it is not REQUIRED to pigtail...


just sayin...

:whistling2:


Did I say it's required?

I said it's a typical installation method. :thumbup:

hpp58 08-26-2008 11:07 AM

You are required to pigtail the grounded wire (white) on a multi-wire branch circuit.

fw2007 08-26-2008 11:17 AM

For the outdoor outlet, I will assume that a GFCI is going to be used.

As for the bathroom/kitchen issue, I was considering extending an already GFCI protected circuit in the basement bathroom to a new outlet outside, but decided against it.
My thinking wasn't code, but that I wouldn't want someone in the br to be left in the dark (I know, lights aren't supposed to be on the GFCI anyway, but this is going to be rewired soon) if my electric lawnmower causes the breaker to trip.

I wired to another GFCI, also located in the basement, but not in the bathroom.
At the same time, I added a new outlet in the basement on the GFCI protected circuit.

FW

CowboyAndy 08-27-2008 05:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by comp1911 (Post 151927)
Did I say it's required?

I said it's a typical installation method. :thumbup:


Maybe in MN...

:whistling2:

Quote:

Originally Posted by fw2007 (Post 151948)
(I know, lights aren't supposed to be on the GFCI anyway, but this is going to be rewired soon) if my electric lawnmower causes the breaker to trip.

There is nothing against lights being GFI.

I've never understood the thinking about being left in the dark when a GFI trips. I mean really, most bathrooms Ive ever been in are like 3 steps to the door! Oh well...

Jim Port 08-27-2008 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 152179)
There is nothing against lights being GFI.

I've never understood the thinking about being left in the dark when a GFI trips. I mean really, most bathrooms Ive ever been in are like 3 steps to the door! Oh well...


What if you were sitting there and the GFI tripped leaving the lights out? How would you know if you had finished all the paperwork? :eek:

Kind of like using motion sensor switching that can't see you in a bathroom with stalls. Stand up and wave your arms wildly and hope for the best or praying for someone to come in so the lights go back on.

comp1911 08-27-2008 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 152179)
Maybe in MN...

:whistling2:


It is in my house. :thumbsup:


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