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Old 04-20-2010, 08:04 PM   #1
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Wiring lights in new construction


Just getting up to speed for upcoming project. Looks from diagrams like a good way to run from switch to ceiling light is to run the hot (black) and neutral (white) to the light. I understand the mechanics of this. Am I correct that you mark the neutral to show it is hot by wrapping a piece of black tape around it? I assume you would do that at both the light and at the receptacle you are coming out of? If this is correct, would the practice be generally accepted by building departments nationwide? Thanks.

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Old 04-20-2010, 08:20 PM   #2
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Wiring lights in new construction


Yes - if using the neutral as a switched hot remark it black
Yes this meets code

It should be running from a switch, not an outlet
You still need a neutral for the light to work

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Old 04-20-2010, 08:21 PM   #3
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Wiring lights in new construction


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Am I correct that you mark the neutral to show it is hot by wrapping a piece of black tape around it? I assume you would do that at both the light and at the receptacle you are coming out of? If this is correct, would the practice be generally accepted by building departments nationwide? Thanks.
Tape or sharpie.

You have to ask locally, but yes either is likely fine. Sharpie is permanent, so do that if you want to be sure your okay.

Jamie
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:40 PM   #4
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Wiring lights in new construction


If I read it correctly, you are coming from the switch to the light.
If that is the case, you do not remark the white wire because it is a neutral wire.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:42 PM   #5
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Wiring lights in new construction


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Tape or sharpie.

You have to ask locally, but yes either is likely fine. Sharpie is permanent, so do that if you want to be sure your okay.

Jamie
Note: I understood your message to mean you were using it as a switch loop, and both wires were hot, if this is the case, yes, remark. If it is a neutral, then do not remark.

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Old 04-20-2010, 08:49 PM   #6
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Wiring lights in new construction


I used Sharpie broad tip and it works fine. The inspector I showed my work to today also approved/recommended it.
I prefer not to have old sticky tape to deal with if I ever have to open it up for any reason.... I hate sticky.

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Old 04-20-2010, 09:16 PM   #7
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Wiring lights in new construction


My question was unclear but Jamie and others got it right. Switch loop is the concept... Now, on to three way switches! (and thanks to all)

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Old 04-20-2010, 09:48 PM   #8
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Wiring lights in new construction


In a switch loop the re-marked white must be the feed to the switch. It caanot be the switched hot. NEC 200.7.
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Old 04-21-2010, 08:58 AM   #9
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Wiring lights in new construction


Technically, you are remarking a white wire for use as a hot wire, not remarking a neutral.

Yes, when you remark a wire, you remark both ends.
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:35 AM   #10
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Wiring lights in new construction


Wil install two light switches in one box, one for porch light and the other a 3-way for hall light. In my 40 year old house, they supplied power to second switches in same box by running a short jumper wire between hot teminals. This however required them to attach two wires to a single terminal using the same set screw. Is this still allowed? Wondering if they have switches now designed for that purpose so you don't have to double up. Thanks.
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:48 AM   #11
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Wiring lights in new construction


This was incorrect years ago and is still improper now. The correct way is to add short jumper pigtails off of the hot leg and join with a wire connector. One pigtail will supply power to each switch.
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Old 05-14-2010, 06:52 AM   #12
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Wiring lights in new construction


Much appreciated!
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Old 05-14-2010, 10:51 AM   #13
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Wiring lights in new construction


They do make switches that will allow this. They are called back wired. The screw has a flat plate under it and clamps the wire. One wire in each side of the screw is permitted.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:45 PM   #14
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Wiring lights in new construction


As long as the switches can be back wired and not back stabbed you are ok.
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Old 05-16-2010, 05:29 PM   #15
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Wiring lights in new construction


Two fixtures would be in two cathedral ceilings with different pitches and installed about 10 feet apart, with set of steps in between. An adjustable can is over $35, while a non adjustable (IC certified) is under $20. It would accept an adjustable trim shield to deflect light downward. Ceilings are 10" rafters. Adjustable can requires 8-9". The other is smaller taking about 7-8". Question: In terms of ease of installation and functionality would both be equally good choices? (aesthetics not a big concern as these are hall lights) Thanks for thoughts.

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