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-   -   Wiring lights in new construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/wiring-lights-new-construction-69499/)

Mi Feller 04-20-2010 09:04 PM

Wiring lights in new construction
 
Just getting up to speed for upcoming project. Looks from diagrams like a good way to run from switch to ceiling light is to run the hot (black) and neutral (white) to the light. I understand the mechanics of this. Am I correct that you mark the neutral to show it is hot by wrapping a piece of black tape around it? I assume you would do that at both the light and at the receptacle you are coming out of? If this is correct, would the practice be generally accepted by building departments nationwide? Thanks.

Scuba_Dave 04-20-2010 09:20 PM

Yes - if using the neutral as a switched hot remark it black
Yes this meets code

It should be running from a switch, not an outlet
You still need a neutral for the light to work

jamiedolan 04-20-2010 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mi Feller (Post 431261)
Am I correct that you mark the neutral to show it is hot by wrapping a piece of black tape around it? I assume you would do that at both the light and at the receptacle you are coming out of? If this is correct, would the practice be generally accepted by building departments nationwide? Thanks.

Tape or sharpie.

You have to ask locally, but yes either is likely fine. Sharpie is permanent, so do that if you want to be sure your okay.

Jamie

jbfan 04-20-2010 09:40 PM

If I read it correctly, you are coming from the switch to the light.
If that is the case, you do not remark the white wire because it is a neutral wire.

jamiedolan 04-20-2010 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamiedolan (Post 431277)
Tape or sharpie.

You have to ask locally, but yes either is likely fine. Sharpie is permanent, so do that if you want to be sure your okay.

Jamie

Note: I understood your message to mean you were using it as a switch loop, and both wires were hot, if this is the case, yes, remark. If it is a neutral, then do not remark.

Jamie

DangerMouse 04-20-2010 09:49 PM

I used Sharpie broad tip and it works fine. The inspector I showed my work to today also approved/recommended it.
I prefer not to have old sticky tape to deal with if I ever have to open it up for any reason.... I hate sticky.

DM

Mi Feller 04-20-2010 10:16 PM

You read it correctly
 
My question was unclear but Jamie and others got it right. Switch loop is the concept... Now, on to three way switches! (and thanks to all)

Jim Port 04-20-2010 10:48 PM

In a switch loop the re-marked white must be the feed to the switch. It caanot be the switched hot. NEC 200.7.

AllanJ 04-21-2010 09:58 AM

Technically, you are remarking a white wire for use as a hot wire, not remarking a neutral.

Yes, when you remark a wire, you remark both ends.

Mi Feller 05-14-2010 07:35 AM

Supplying power to 2 switches in same box
 
Wil install two light switches in one box, one for porch light and the other a 3-way for hall light. In my 40 year old house, they supplied power to second switches in same box by running a short jumper wire between hot teminals. This however required them to attach two wires to a single terminal using the same set screw. Is this still allowed? Wondering if they have switches now designed for that purpose so you don't have to double up. Thanks.

Jim Port 05-14-2010 07:48 AM

This was incorrect years ago and is still improper now. The correct way is to add short jumper pigtails off of the hot leg and join with a wire connector. One pigtail will supply power to each switch.

Mi Feller 05-14-2010 07:52 AM

Very interesing and thank you.
 
Much appreciated!

joed 05-14-2010 11:51 AM

They do make switches that will allow this. They are called back wired. The screw has a flat plate under it and clamps the wire. One wire in each side of the screw is permitted.

Chevyman30571 05-14-2010 08:45 PM

As long as the switches can be back wired and not back stabbed you are ok.

Mi Feller 05-16-2010 06:29 PM

Considering 2 types of recessed lights for cathedral ceiling
 
Two fixtures would be in two cathedral ceilings with different pitches and installed about 10 feet apart, with set of steps in between. An adjustable can is over $35, while a non adjustable (IC certified) is under $20. It would accept an adjustable trim shield to deflect light downward. Ceilings are 10" rafters. Adjustable can requires 8-9". The other is smaller taking about 7-8". Question: In terms of ease of installation and functionality would both be equally good choices? (aesthetics not a big concern as these are hall lights) Thanks for thoughts.


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