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Old 01-09-2006, 10:51 AM   #1
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Wiring Design Considerations Question


Good morning,

I'm in the process of finishing my basement, and have some questions about design considerations for wiring.

The basement is broke into a large entertainment room, a home theatre room, arts/crafts room for the kids, and an exercise room. In addition, I will have a full bath and a wet bar.

Counting things out per NEC, I would have 14 outlets in the entertainment area, 6 in the exercise room, 5 in the home theatre, and 4 in the arts/crafts room. I'd need 6 GFCI for the countertop space on the wet bar, and one GFCI for the bathroom.

Here's where the questions begin:

There is nothing in our local code that limits the number of receptacles on a branch circuit for a residential dwelling. Since NEC doesn't limit this either, I was thinking of dividing the circuits like this:

One branch circuit for all of the lighting (12 can lights with max of one 100W bulb, three wall sconces, max one 100W bulb, pool table light max 3 60W bulbs, bar light, max one 75W bulb)

14 outlets on entertainment room branch circuit (logic for design being that at any given time, only two or three of the outlets will ever have anything plugged into them)

15 outlets on Arts/crafts room, exercise room, home theatre on a branch circuit. Again, the exercise room will have a stereo plugged in, and the theatre will have a stereo, TV, and DVD player plugged in. At any given time, I can only see four or five of the outlets with anything plugged into them.

6 wet bar GFCI outlets plus bath GFCI outlet on 20AM branch circuit. Code says that you need a separate 20A for bath circuit, but when we built the house new, the inspector allowed the electrician to wire all three of our other bathrooms to one circuit (i.e. When we test the GFCI in the 2nd story bathroom, both 1st story bathroom outlets trip, too). Following that same logic, I thought it would work to have the wet bar outlets and bath outlet on the same 20A circuit. Only issue that I can think of is that a potential (though VERY slight) exists that a hair dryer could be going in the bathroom, while a pizza oven would be operating on the wet bar area. Also, NEC calls for separate small appliance circuit on countertops, and separate 20A for bath, so that might not be code.

Can one of the pros tell me if this sounds at all feasible, or if I should be breaking it into additional circuits for the different rooms?

Thanks in advance!
TJ

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Old 01-09-2006, 11:26 AM   #2
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Wiring Design Considerations Question


I think you'll get shot down on at least the gfi part but the fellows should be along to give you the straight scoop. They are probably all working right now. HS..

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Old 01-09-2006, 12:28 PM   #3
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Wiring Design Considerations Question


Yah, the more I think about the GFCI thing, the more I think that I will need to run two circuits for it. With code saying that you must have a separate small appliance circuit, and must have a separate bath circuit, they seem pretty mutually exclusive
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Old 01-10-2006, 06:36 AM   #4
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Wiring Design Considerations Question


Are you putting the lighting on a 20 amp breaker? with the load you describe, it needs to be. The bathroom must be on a seperate 20 amp breaker. With this outlet you can feed another bathroom outlet only, or you can serve everything in that 1 bathroom on the 20 amp circuit. The wet bar is not considered a kitche, so does not need the 2 small appliance circuits. If you have the space in your panel, and feel you will need 2 circuits, then put them in. What is going to be inside your excerise room. If you are going to have treadmills, and other pieces of equipment that uses electricity, then you should consider using more circuits. My local code requires 10 or less per circuit, so I have never had more than that.
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Old 01-10-2006, 08:33 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan
Are you putting the lighting on a 20 amp breaker? with the load you describe, it needs to be.
I was going to do a 15A. I will split it into two circuits instead then, one for each half of the basement. That way I can also still have half the basement lit in case one of the breakers pops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan
The bathroom must be on a seperate 20 amp breaker. With this outlet you can feed another bathroom outlet only, or you can serve everything in that 1 bathroom on the 20 amp circuit.
Would this mean that I could branch off of the existing bathroom circuit that is serving the other 2 1/2 baths, and add a fourth GFCI outltet to that circuit? That circuit is currently dedicated to feeding just the outlets in the bathrooms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan
The wet bar is not considered a kitche, so does not need the 2 small appliance circuits.
Wouldn't I still need GFCI given the proximity of the outlet(s) on the counter to a sink?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan
What is going to be inside your excerise room. If you are going to have treadmills, and other pieces of equipment that uses electricity, then you should consider using more circuits.
I will have a bowflex, a recumbant exercise bike, and an ab roller for the exercise room. The only thing that will be plugged in will be a stereo for music in there.

Thanks for all of the advice!
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Old 01-10-2006, 02:08 PM   #6
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Wiring Design Considerations Question


You could just tap into the exsisting bathrooms, but I would not do it. If you have plenty of room in the panel, just dedicate one circuit for the bathrrom outlet and lights. I would still use the gfcis for the wet bar area. With the load you are going to have, it would still be a good idea to use 2 circuits.
In the excerise room, just make sure that if you add items later on, that some use and require dedicated circuts. Spliting the lights make good sense.
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Old 09-26-2006, 05:44 AM   #7
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my bad, forgot this was an old thread as I was reading it


Last edited by hurricaneflyer; 09-26-2006 at 05:51 AM. Reason: my bad
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