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-   -   Wiring 220V Chandelier for 110V (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/wiring-220v-chandelier-110v-60973/)

ntxcop 01-03-2010 10:36 PM

Wiring 220V Chandelier for 110V
 
1 Attachment(s)
I have a crystal chandelier I purchased 20 years ago when I was stationed in Germany. The chandelier was purchased in Checkoslavakia and was wired for 220V. It has a single insulated wire coming from the fixture which containes three smaller wires (blue, black, and brown). I'm not sure which wire is ground (if any). I had it installed in a previous house 16 years ago and took it down prior to selling the house. I haven't had the chance to re-install it until now and can't remember how it was wired before. I've installed light fixtures and ceiling fans and even assisted a friend with wiring a new construction house once. I have basic knowledge of electrical circuitry. I was going to ohm out the wires to see where they go, but my digital multi meter appears to be on the blink, so I'll have to purchase a new one tomorrow. Anyone ever run across this or have any quick ideas about how to connect this chandelier to 110V?

spark plug 01-03-2010 11:00 PM

Get a CONTINUITY TESTER! (Could be a Buzzer, Beeper or a light.) Trace out the lead wires. The BASE (of the sockets) is HOT. Connect to BLACK. The "CUP" of the Socket/s is NEUTRAL. The Third wire (no matter what color) should trace to the "FRAME" of the Chandelier. Connect to GROUND. Hopefully. you're inserting light bulbs powered by 120v. (No matter what) Don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!!:yes:!

ntxcop 01-03-2010 11:39 PM

Thanks
 
Awesome, Thanks for the info Spark Plug. I knew someone on here would know the answer. My old digital multi meter could check continuity by setting it to read ohms and it would buzz if the wires had continuity. I will purchase a new one tomorrow and make sure it has the same feature so I can trace the wires to find which one goes to the base and which one goes to the cup.

Oh, the advise is good too.... Never drink and drive... the outcome usually is not worth the buzz!!!

frenchelectrican 01-04-2010 01:23 AM

The safest way is ring it out with ohmmeter however there is one gotcha the former eastern European area the colour codes in their area is almost anything goes not really consant with western European area as modern time however if that connections is corrrect per my memory the black is netural while is red is line the green/yellow is resvered for earth { ground }

but with modern European colour code it pretty much standarized now Brown is line , Bleu is netural , green with yellow strip is earth.

Anyway ring the shell that have to be netural while the centre concat is line but nice gotcha is if you have double concat base that will get tricky normally it will be isolated.

Merci,Marc

spark plug 01-04-2010 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frenchelectrican (Post 376286)
The safest way is ring it out with ohmmeter however there is one gotcha the former eastern European area the colour codes in their area is almost anything goes not really consant with western European area as modern time however if that connections is corrrect per my memory the black is netural while is red is line the green/yellow is resvered for earth { ground }

but with modern European colour code it pretty much standarized now Brown is line , Bleu is netural , green with yellow strip is earth.

Anyway ring the shell that have to be netural while the centre concat is line but nice gotcha is if you have double concat base that will get tricky normally it will be isolated.

Merci,Marc

I've seen "Double Contact" base over here, dans les Etats Unies. (In the good ol' USA) But those are not standard Chandelier bulbs and sockets. They're used in some EXIT lights.:yes:!

daniorerio 12-26-2012 11:19 AM

Going in the other direction? 110V chandelier to 220V
 
Hi everyone,
Does anyone have advice on going in the opposite direction? Using a 110V chandelier purchased in the US on a 220V network in South America?
Thanks so much in advance!

AllanJ 12-26-2012 05:53 PM

When you ohm out (test for continuity) you should find that one wire coming out the top goes to all the socket shells (connect to neutral wire in ceiling) and one wire coming out the top goes to all the socket bottom contacts (connect to hot wire in ceiling).

Then no wiring change is needed other than buying lamps (bulbs) of the new voltage.

If you are unlucky you may find that one wire comes to some socket shells and some bottom contacts and vice versa. The chandelier will still work regardless of which of these two you connect hot and neutral in the ceiling to respectively but there is the slight loss of safety with the socket shell, which might be a bit exposed, hot.

You would use the same test procedure going in the opposite direction except you are taking a chance that the U.S. intended wiring is rated for 220/240 volts (in South America, Europe, China, etc.)

For two bottom contacts it doesn't matter which one is hot and which one is neutral.

dmxtothemax 12-26-2012 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daniorerio (Post 1079836)
Hi everyone,
Does anyone have advice on going in the opposite direction? Using a 110V chandelier purchased in the US on a 220V network in South America?
Thanks so much in advance!

Provided the insulation of the wires is up to it ? (good chance).
It should be ok.
make sure it is earthed correctly.
But it may not be up to code ?
Which may effect insurance.


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