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Old 09-25-2009, 06:44 PM   #1
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


Can I run 2 additional 12 gauge wires in existing EMT for a baseboard heater or do I need a dedicated conduit for the 220? Does a baseboard heater need a switch in addition to a thermostat?

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Old 09-25-2009, 08:11 PM   #2
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


Depends on the size of EMT you have and how many wires you have. You need to make sure you keep your conduit fill down. You don't need a dedicated conduit for the heaters. Also you don't need a switch along with the t stat.

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Old 09-25-2009, 08:18 PM   #3
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


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Originally Posted by jodywoj View Post
Can I run 2 additional 12 gauge wires in existing EMT for a baseboard heater Yes, if the conduit is large enough and the wire can be derated and still carry the loads/draw.

or do I need a dedicated conduit for the 220? Depends on my earlier statement, 120v and 240v loads can usually be run in the same conduit

Does a baseboard heater need a switch in addition to a thermostat? No switch needed if it is a two pole/double line break T-stat.

Thanks,
1. What size conduit?
2. How many existing wires? What size?
3. Is the EMT the grounding conductor/ground connection? Does the EMT go completlely back to the panel?
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:27 PM   #4
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


It's 1/2 in conduit. Right now there are 2 #12 and 2 #14. The emt is the ground. It runs from panel to 4 inch box. I was going to run greenfield from the 4 inch box to the heater.

Thanks

Last edited by jodywoj; 09-25-2009 at 08:30 PM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:36 PM   #5
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


You are good to go. I ran the calcs.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:40 PM   #6
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by jodywoj View Post
It's 1/2 in conduit. Right now there are 2 #12 and 2 #14. The emt is the ground. It runs from panel to 4 inch box. I was going to run greenfield from the 4 inch box to the heater.

Thanks
Define greenfield, it is used in many ways, MC, AC, or metal flex that you install the wires.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:43 PM   #7
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


COde 05

I'm not really sure what it is. It's like BX, but without the conducters. I was planning on using 3/8. I gues it's galvanized steel, but I'm not positive.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:55 PM   #8
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


BX is a trade term often used for AC ( armored cable) , it has an internal ground strap with existing wires. If i read correctly you are using FMT ( flex metal conduit), where you put the wire in your self. You will need to run a ground/ green wire with your two hot wires. Attach the ground wire to the 4" box with a 10/24 screw/ or bolt and nut and then put the other end on the green screw at the unit. Flex does not count as a ground like EMT. Do you understand what I wrote?
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:59 PM   #9
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


I sure do. Thanks for all the info. This is my first time using this site. It's great to get real help. Thanks again.
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Old 09-25-2009, 09:04 PM   #10
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


You are welcome. Let us know how it turns out.
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Old 09-27-2009, 07:28 PM   #11
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wiring 220v baseboard heater


Under certain conditions flexible metal conduit is approved as a equipment grounding conductor. Basically not over 6 feet in lenght or more than 20 amps.

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