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Old 07-02-2008, 12:43 PM   #16
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Wire nut capacities


The wire nut was invented to save time and money. To eliminate soldering, taping and twisting of conductors. Twist if you must. But I don't twist and don't plan on twisting in the future. The wirenut and the wingnut are designed so twisting is not necessary.
Now we can argue over if they should be taped.

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Old 07-02-2008, 12:47 PM   #17
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OK,maybe "hack" was a bit strong! sorry if I offended any electricians out there but I was immensely P.O.'d when I found where the intermittent was. seems to me the code ought to take the future into account: sure,when you strip two copper wires for the 1st time, you've got nice shiny copper and no doubt sticking a wire nut on those nice shiny wires makes a decent connection BUT after some years enough oxide will build up on those previously clean wires to where you've got an intermittent. twisting should be part of the code!

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Old 07-02-2008, 01:08 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by analogmusicman View Post
OK,maybe "hack" was a bit strong! sorry if I offended any electricians out there but I was immensely P.O.'d when I found where the intermittent was. seems to me the code ought to take the future into account: sure,when you strip two copper wires for the 1st time, you've got nice shiny copper and no doubt sticking a wire nut on those nice shiny wires makes a decent connection BUT after some years enough oxide will build up on those previously clean wires to where you've got an intermittent. twisting should be part of the code!

tnx,
No offense taken. If the electrician had installed the wirenut or wingnut correctly it should not have failed. The key is to follow the manufacturers instructions. Too many wires, not enough wires or wrong size wires under the nut can cause issues.
Occasionally a wirenut will lose a wire, it's just a fact of life in our business. That is why many of us do twist, just to make double sure. I have found it easier not to twist. When you are installing wirenuts or wingnuts all day you would understand why........John
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Old 07-02-2008, 08:41 PM   #19
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Wire nut capacities


I've done mostly commercial/industrial for about 18 years. I've learned to do the following: Phase conductors (hots) I never twist. Neutrals of a multi-wire circuit (where the neutral is shared by more than 1 hot) I always twist. I also twist grounds. In all cases, I always hold the wirenut, and pull and wiggle each wire to see if its loose.

I work a lot of stuff hot, and if I undo a wirenut on a phase conductor that's been twisted, and I need to isolate one or more of the wires, I'm very likely to get shocked or blown up. It's very difficult to get one wire out this way. On an untwisted splice, it's easy and safe to remove one.

The reason I twist neutrals and grounds is because you'll never want these splices to come apart while it's hot. Breaking the neutral of a multi-wire circuit while it's hot will almost certainly destroy equipment downstream.

We all have our individual way of doing things, as long as you're within code and manufacturers instructions, you're OK.

Rob

P.S. Over the years, I've seen about 3 twisted splices fail for every 1 untwisted, maybe 20 total.
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Old 07-02-2008, 09:04 PM   #20
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Wire nut capacities


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Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
Now we can argue over if they should be taped.
Now that chaps my I can't stand to see a taped wirenut. What's the purpose? To hold the wirenut on? If it was put on correctly in the first place then this wouldn't be a probelm. When I see tape on a wirenut, I'm thinking:did they strip the wire to long and exposed conductor is hanging out, or when I take the tape off is it just gonna all come busting out like a jack in the box. That's my 2 cents on that.
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Old 07-02-2008, 09:45 PM   #21
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Wire nut capacities


I am against taping as I want to easily see if the insulation is stripped too short or not and also don't like to gum up the wires where not needed. Regarding twisting, I think the newer wirenuts are made especially to avoid the practice of twisting. The springs are made in such a way as to groove the conductors so they stay tightly bound together and if stripped and connected properly the conductors have more than enough contact to make a good connection.
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Last edited by handyman78; 07-02-2008 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 09-17-2013, 05:34 PM   #22
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Let me tell you a story regarding the intermittent issues of circuits. For years I suffered problems I thought related to earlier lightening strikes, a racoon in the truss space, and or a hot headed tradesman who cut all my electrical wires on the outside walls (he and his father both were like that): a year ago I had an electrician come into my home on another matter and the first thing he did was go thru my panel. He tightened every connection in it. When he left I discovered two other issues I had for years were gone. Sometimes these connections (for whatever reasons) can loosen... similiar to the wall dry wall nails used to be pushed out by wet wood drying. It's a good idea to remember this when you're looking for a problem. Happy hunting!!!

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