Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-27-2012, 05:19 PM   #16
Newbie
 
kbc1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 22
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


Quote:
Originally Posted by diyguy41
That is a good point about the 12/2 vs 10/2 in the receptacles I could route things to run 4,200 watts per circuit which is around 18 amps I was just concerned about bumping up to the 85% rule. On the flip side, that has to be a little on the conservative side, no?

One last question, what size PVC conduit am I looking at in order to run two #3 and a #6 wire. Is that 2"? It is a 24 foot run with a 90 degree bend on each end. Not going to be terribly fun I imagine

More fun that cutting an egress window in my 110yo foundation. Did that last year. Not messy at all LOL

Thanks again guys!
i would use 1-1/4 make it more easier, also why not run a couple of smaller pvc pipes while you have a trench for future phone , tv, etc.....

kbc1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 09:37 PM   #17
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 2,557
Rewards Points: 2,010
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


Quote:
Originally Posted by Glennsparky View Post
Maximum breaker for #12 NM (NM-B/Romex) is 20A. Since he needs a 25A breaker. It's either upsize the NM or use a different wiring method.

And, does somebody have a code book? What's the de-rating at 94 degrees?
Good point. Even though I mentioned it recently, I didn't put 2+2 together. He'll need #10 wire and 30A breakers (25 if he can find them, but not likely). That also makes the 15A receptacles noncompliant. He'll need to hard-wire the lights or use 30A rated connectors (twist-lock probably).
__________________
I am a lawyer, but not your lawyer. And who cares anyways? We're here to talk construction. This is DIY advice, not legal advice.
mpoulton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 11:09 PM   #18
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
You shouldn't need #10 wire for 20A circuits. These runs aren't likely to be long enough for voltage drop to require up-sizing the conductors, so #12 is fine. You also shouldn't need delays between lamp startups, since the 80% load factor provides plenty of overhead and most lighting doesn't have a significant startup surge. If the greenhouse is not attached to the garage, then you need to put the new panel in the greenhouse, not in the garage. If it's attached to the garage then having the panel and other equipment in the garage instead of the greenhouse is probably better since it spares the equipment from humidity. Greenhouses are very hard on electrical equipment. But If the greenhouse is IN the garage, then the plants probably aren't "ornamental"...
In OP's situation if they want to keep 20 amp circuit you have to derated them to 16 amp which that is 80% right there and the only time I used the word " continous " if the load will stay on 3 hours or more then the derating do kick in.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 11:35 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,508
Rewards Points: 2,004
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


Quote:
Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
Because all the OP's loads are 240volts, you are not required to run a grounded conductor (neutral) to a sub-panel.
You are saying 3 wire sub panels are compliant?
I am asking. Why would anyone set a sub panel with a 3 wire feeder?
I know it would be a four wire feeder if I was installing it.

Even with a 120 volt service, you still have the grounded conductor.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 11:48 AM   #20
TTW
Member
 
TTW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Maine
Posts: 350
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


I would run the Neutral so I had a 120 volt outlet to plug in the radio. It makes the plants happier (as long as you don't play heavy metal).
TTW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 12:30 PM   #21
E2 Electrician
 
stickboy1375's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Litchfield, CT
Posts: 5,132
Rewards Points: 2,056
Default

Wire gauge for 80 amp continues load


Quote:
Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
You are saying 3 wire sub panels are compliant?
I am asking. Why would anyone set a sub panel with a 3 wire feeder?
I know it would be a four wire feeder if I was installing it.

Even with a 120 volt service, you still have the grounded conductor.
The service is required to have a grounded conductor run. After that point though, if all my loads are line to line, what is the purpose to have a grounded conductor to a sub panel?

stickboy1375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Generator to transfe switch wire gauge Kirk5291 Electrical 3 07-18-2012 11:31 AM
Ceiling fan and wire gauge needs? greentrees Electrical 6 05-01-2012 01:05 AM
efficiency voltage drop wire gauge jackwashere Electrical 6 02-18-2012 08:33 PM
What Gauge Wire do I need? rjrivero Electrical 23 11-03-2011 04:11 PM
Standard gauge for household electrical wire tripower Electrical 2 09-21-2008 11:42 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.