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-   -   Will a circuit breaker always cut off if there is overcurrent to it (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/will-circuit-breaker-always-cut-off-if-there-overcurrent-150829/)

theracoat 07-19-2012 01:45 PM

Will a circuit breaker always cut off if there is overcurrent to it
 
I recently got a bunch of high amp circuit breakers from someone and am planning on selling them, but I am a little worried about the liability. If a circuit breaker works in the sense that it can draw power, is it safe to assume that it would shut off if there is overcurrent to it?

k_buz 07-19-2012 01:58 PM

nope:no:

mpoulton 07-19-2012 02:10 PM

A quick web search on Federal Pacific (FPE) panels will show the potential problem. Here's a video of another old brand of breaker not functioning:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMV1jmDn3o4

rjniles 07-19-2012 03:07 PM

If they are new I woild sell "as is". If used I would not.

jbfan 07-19-2012 03:36 PM

The theroy says it should, but the reality is, used breakers should be dumped unelss you have the equipment to test and certify them.

Yoyizit 07-19-2012 04:03 PM

[A sample of] new breakers are tested at the factory for 10,000 tries.
You could test your breakers 100 times and still not be sure they will work on the 101st try.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunrise_problem

BTW, consecutive successes with no failure is "right censored data", so to do the reliability calcs I guess they assume it would have failed on the 10,000 plus 1 try.

But, how often will a house breaker be called upon to trip?
This is the "mission length"; how reliable is a breaker that fails in less than 10,000 attempts when it only needs to work on 1 or 10 or 30 overloads?


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