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-   -   why does an office coffee maker need 2 hots? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/why-does-office-coffee-maker-need-2-hots-158203/)

amakarevic 09-27-2012 08:29 PM

why does an office coffee maker need 2 hots?
 
i noticed the cord of our office coffee maker is 12/3. it has hot water in addition to 2 warming plates. is it that brewing water takes one hot and and the warmers take another. i just thought that something that small could get away on a single hot.

brric 09-27-2012 08:43 PM

Is that an SO cord? If so, 12-3 SO has only three conductors, white, black, green.

kbsparky 09-27-2012 08:47 PM

Flexible cords markings indicate all conductors, including the ground wire.

A cord marked 12/3 would have a black, white, and green conductor.

ONE hot wire, one neutral wire, and one ground wire.

You do have 2 current-carrying conductors. You do not have 2 "hots".

dmxtothemax 09-27-2012 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 1018782)
i noticed the cord of our office coffee maker is 12/3. it has hot water in addition to 2 warming plates. is it that brewing water takes one hot and and the warmers take another. i just thought that something that small could get away on a single hot.

Heating elements usually use a lot of electricity !
A water heating element could easily be 2000w or more !
The two warming plates could easily be 1000w a piece !
Thats 4000w, thats not a small amount of power !
Your more likely to find a 40A outlet at 220v than 120v !

I am only guessing at these figures as I cant see the name plate,
But I think they would be reasonable !

mpoulton 09-27-2012 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 1018782)
i noticed the cord of our office coffee maker is 12/3. it has hot water in addition to 2 warming plates. is it that brewing water takes one hot and and the warmers take another. i just thought that something that small could get away on a single hot.

As others have noted, 12/3 flexible cord only has three conductors. But some commercial coffee makers are 120/240V, requiring two hots, neutral, and ground. They often draw more than the 2400W maximum available on a 20A 120V circuit, so they rely on a 15 or 20A 240V circuit for all the heating power, and use 120V for controls. It takes a lot of power to heat water. Even a small home coffee maker is usually over 1000W.

dmxtothemax 09-27-2012 10:23 PM

Most electric kettles in Australia are 2000 to 2400w.
Havent seen any as small as 1000w.
Unless it is different in the USA !

Protocol. 09-27-2012 11:18 PM

I think there needs to be a seperation of residential and commercial coffee makers. I see many residential units in small offices. I also have worked on large 5 gallon 3-phase units.

A 12/3 cord is just a regular cord. It shouldn't be 220V. A brand new Bunn VP17-3 is only rated for about 14 A (3 total warming plates). It's a resistive load so it does not need a 20A recept. 1000W is more than hot enough to BOIL a very LARGE pot of water. Those warmers should only be about 100-150W.

The only time you start getting into 220V is into larger or higher volume brewers that require fast boiling. Start seeing more 220V in commercial kitchens + cafe espresso machines.

k_buz 09-28-2012 04:47 AM

I am currently wiring a brand new Dunkin Donuts and they have two types of regular coffee makers: a single brew with two warming plates and a dual brew with 4 warming plates. The dual brew requires a 50A 120/208 single phase circuit, and the single brew requires a 20A 120/208 circuit.

Billy_Bob 09-28-2012 09:53 AM

What does the outlet look like which this plugs into? Various types...
http://www.generatorjoe.net/html/web...quailplug.html

And on the back of the unit should be a "name plate". That should say what voltage and amperage/wattage the unit is. What does that say?


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