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rgsgww 11-23-2008 04:10 AM

Where can I buy this?
 
Where can I buy RG/11 Quad coaxial cable per foot? I have been searching around for a long time...

jerryh3 11-23-2008 06:57 AM

Find a cable guy doing service work and make a deal. How much do you need?

rgsgww 11-23-2008 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 188872)
Find a cable guy doing service work and make a deal. How much do you need?


It needs to be indoor...only about 100ft.

jerryh3 11-23-2008 01:37 PM

Are you sure you need 11? If you can wait a few days, you can get 100' foot rolls of Ebay.

theatretch85 11-23-2008 02:09 PM

Why do you need RG11? RG11 is like what the cable company installs in the ground up to your house and then its RG6 inside the house (RG59 if you happen to be un-lucky, haha). The RG11 is pretty big coax cable, and it requires special connectors to connect to a standard coax jack.

rgsgww 11-23-2008 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 189029)
Why do you need RG11? RG11 is like what the cable company installs in the ground up to your house and then its RG6 inside the house (RG59 if you happen to be un-lucky, haha). The RG11 is pretty big coax cable, and it requires special connectors to connect to a standard coax jack.


Im unlucky :(

I have rg/59 installed...I just decided to use rg/6Q instead. Wanted to max my install...

theatretch85 11-23-2008 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 189032)
Im unlucky :(

I have rg/59 installed...I just decided to use rg/6Q instead. Wanted to max my install...

RG6 quad shield would be more than adequate in any home. That's what I ended up replacing all the RG59 that was installed in my house with. The RG6 is easy to work with and requires no special connections. I'd recommend you at least use crimp connectors for the install, but if you can afford it go for the compression connectors. Just don't use the twist on connectors, they are the cheapest and the worst connectors to use with coax cable.

rgsgww 11-23-2008 04:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 189034)
RG6 quad shield would be more than adequate in any home. That's what I ended up replacing all the RG59 that was installed in my house with. The RG6 is easy to work with and requires no special connections. I'd recommend you at least use crimp connectors for the install, but if you can afford it go for the compression connectors. Just don't use the twist on connectors, they are the cheapest and the worst connectors to use with coax cable.


Im not sure how it will all work out...the cable co. will drop rg/11Q to my house and im going to do the hookups inside...right now I have a temporary rg/6 dropped to my house.

I always use the compression connectors...I use the Ideal brand... they are pretty easy to install...I just strip the outer jacket about 1/2" and fold back the shielding, slice the dielectric about 1/4", push the connector on, and snap it in place.

Alot of my house has rg/59...to replace it would be very difficult...I might be able to...my attic has some pretty thick areas of insulation...

theatretch85 11-23-2008 04:40 PM

The connection from the cable company usually connects to a ground block on the outside of the house, what you do with it after that block is your business. Just make sure that block gets properly grounded. I have seen in some cases where the cable company will install a plastic box like a telephone demarcation box, these are usually installed higher up on the outside of the house than a ground block would be. The grounding block inside still needs to be properly grounded with this type of install as well.

Alan 11-23-2008 04:40 PM

Are you going to be signing up for cable tv service? If you are, sometimes they will give you what you need to prewire your house for their service. That way the installers don't have to do it later.

rgsgww 11-23-2008 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theatretch85 (Post 189114)
The connection from the cable company usually connects to a ground block on the outside of the house, what you do with it after that block is your business. Just make sure that block gets properly grounded. I have seen in some cases where the cable company will install a plastic box like a telephone demarcation box, these are usually installed higher up on the outside of the house than a ground block would be. The grounding block inside still needs to be properly grounded with this type of install as well.


Actually I had to install one...they forgot to install one back in 2001...

I got 10 awg to the block... goes a short distance to ground (about 4 ft.)

(its bonded to the system ground, no rods)

Conduit extends into the structure, no external boxes.

rgsgww 11-23-2008 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan (Post 189116)
Are you going to be signing up for cable tv service? If you are, sometimes they will give you what you need to prewire your house for their service. That way the installers don't have to do it later.


No, I have been signed up for years. I'm having a bridge replaced that had the service conductors, cable, and phone hooked to it. Decided to go for rg/11 since I'm having all of that re ran in conduit instead of direct burial.

The original serivce was paralelled since they must have not had big enough wire...


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