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Old 05-01-2011, 11:55 AM   #1
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


....(which are required in the basement, right?), should I run the power all the way to one side of the basement, then come back across connecting them in line? Or come down off the panel, and just split it in 2 different directions? Only the first one on the line has to be GFCI, and it will protect the rest, right? I don't think there will be more than 8 outlets in total.

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Old 05-01-2011, 12:35 PM   #2
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


If this not a finished basement, than all would be gfi protected. All 8 can be on one circuit with the gfi being first in line.
If this is a finished basement than the do not require to gfi protected, but afci protected.

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Old 05-01-2011, 01:04 PM   #3
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Start at the panel and work out. I see no reason to run across the basement and work back unless you like to spend money on cable.
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Old 05-01-2011, 02:44 PM   #4
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


You could run this in the T or an ABCD.
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Old 05-01-2011, 03:30 PM   #5
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
You could run this in the T or an ABCD.
Alright Jim, you got me. What does this mean?
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Old 05-01-2011, 03:44 PM   #6
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


The OP asked about going in two directions from the GFI. I assumed a T arrangment.
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Last edited by Jim Port; 05-01-2011 at 10:21 PM.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:37 PM   #7
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Being that there is a gfci right off the panel, since it was unfinished (I'm finishing it now), you're saying I can run outlets in 2 different directions off of it? Will that crowd the box, or am i just being a rookie?

Last edited by nateshirk; 05-01-2011 at 08:22 PM.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:43 PM   #8
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


It will make the box more crowded since you have a third cable to deal with. A deeper box will definitely help fit everything in.
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Old 05-01-2011, 08:22 PM   #9
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Sounds good. Thanks.
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Old 05-04-2011, 02:02 PM   #10
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Turns out that the GFCI outlet already in the basement goes to the one outlet in the garage. Right where I was planning on running one for my freezer. Now I don't have to. I thought 20 amp outlets were recognized by the extra slot on the left prong hole. Is this not always the case? I know it's 20 amp because I followed a yellow wire right to that outlet, and even took the plate off and looked in and saw the yellow wire. Yet, it looks like a regular 15 amp outlet. As a matter of fact, none of the 20 amp outlets in my house have the special prong hole. What am I missing here? How else can I tell a 20 amp outlet when I see one?

Anyway. Now I'm adding a 15 amp breaker to run the electric in the basement outlets, and 2 lights (one in each storage space).
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Old 05-04-2011, 03:50 PM   #11
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


In Canada a 20A circuit requires 20A receptacles but that's not the case in USA.

Since all 15A receptacles allow 20A to pass through it in the USA you can put 15A recepts on 20A circuits and in fact it's very rare in the USA to see otherwise. Reason being, typically anything you plug in will almost always draw 15A or less. The only way to tell, is to look at the breaker to see it's 20A and to look at the wire to see it's 12 awg like you did.

Look at it this way... 15A recepts are all designed to allow 20A to pass through. It would be dangerous to plug in something that draws 20A in a 15A recept even if the circuit is capable of it but you wouldn't be able to because that device would have the special prong so you couldn't plug it in. You'd have to swap out the recept if you had such a device... but true 20A devices are not very common.

So, the norm in the USA is to have 15A recepts on 20A circuits (unless the code changed very recently).

Last edited by Piedmont; 05-04-2011 at 04:02 PM.
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:07 PM   #12
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When I add my GFCI outlets.......


Cool. Thank you for verifying that. So is it even helping at all to plug the freezer into this outlet? I read before it would help to not trip the breaker as easy as if it were plugged into a 15 amp outlet.

* or I guess it just lets more current (more devices) pass through at one time.


Last edited by nateshirk; 05-04-2011 at 09:10 PM.
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