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Old 10-04-2011, 08:12 PM   #1
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


I would need one with at least 6 outlets

Therefore, can someone please give me a hint on what features I should look for to connect one computer, one 3d monitor, one Stereo System, one 1080p projector, and one HDTV?

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Old 10-04-2011, 08:15 PM   #2
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


The best one you can afford. You get what you pay for.

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Old 10-04-2011, 08:38 PM   #3
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


This will work fine http://www.lowes.com/pd_119321-66906...0Entertainment Now, you did not state if they are going to be in the same room, since you mentioned 3 viewing devices, and a computer. If you own the place, put in a whole house surge protector. this is what I use http://menards.com/main/electrical/e...337-c-6412.htm There is also http://menards.com/main/electrical/r...827-c-6434.htm
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:41 PM   #4
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


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This will work fine http://www.lowes.com/pd_119321-66906...0Entertainment Now, you did not state if they are going to be in the same room, since you mentioned 3 viewing devices, and a computer. If you own the place, put in a whole house surge protector. this is what I use http://menards.com/main/electrical/e...337-c-6412.htm There is also http://menards.com/main/electrical/r...827-c-6434.htm
I might only get the one you suggested first since I don't own the place, however isn't 3240-Joule a lot since this is what it says on wiki:

"Some manufacturers commonly design higher joule rated surge protectors by connecting multiple MOVs in parallel. Since individual MOVs have slightly different non-linear responses when exposed to the same overvoltage, any given MOV might be more sensitive than others. This can cause one MOV in a group to conduct more (a phenomenon called current-hogging), leading to overuse and eventually premature failure of that component. If a single inline fuse is placed in series with the MOVs as a power-off safety feature, it will open and fail the surge protector even if remaining MOVs are intact."

Should I still get that one?
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:49 PM   #5
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


Don't worry about what Wiki.org says. People that update stuff on there are idiots. The 3240 will work fine, if you want larger, go the next one up. Most power distribution systems have capacitor banks, which help with smoothing out the power grid, but having the surge helps for insurance. You can also check with the owner to see if they will install the whole panel surge, if you purchase it. Leviton makes a outlet type surge also. I have the surge with the alarm, so if something does happen, I hear it. Especially with it protecting our Plasma.

As for your set up, again, is everything going to be on the same surge, or different parts of the room?
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:34 PM   #6
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


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Don't worry about what Wiki.org says. People that update stuff on there are idiots. The 3240 will work fine, if you want larger, go the next one up. Most power distribution systems have capacitor banks, which help with smoothing out the power grid, but having the surge helps for insurance. You can also check with the owner to see if they will install the whole panel surge, if you purchase it. Leviton makes a outlet type surge also. I have the surge with the alarm, so if something does happen, I hear it. Especially with it protecting our Plasma.

As for your set up, again, is everything going to be on the same surge, or different parts of the room?
All 5 items (monitor, projector, hdtv, stereo, pc) will be in the same room.
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:42 PM   #7
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


The only thing is, you do not want to stretch a power cord clear across the room for say the projector, even though the switcher is say next to the computer or flatscreen. You may want to get a couple of surge strips, if plugging stuff in different areas of the room. A/V cables, you can get through monoprice.com, same as a/v switchers. Surge strips on monoprice.com, it appears that the 3150 joule is the largest they sell through their site.

Parts express a lot better choices http://www.parts-express.com/wizards...=surge&x=0&y=0 If it was me, living in an apartment, I would get a power conditioner vs. just a surge strip. If doing any kind of audio recording, a Isolation transformer is also a good option http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=125-130
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:49 PM   #8
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


Don't waste your money, buy a UPS.
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Old 10-04-2011, 11:01 PM   #9
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Don't waste your money, buy a UPS.
That is wasting your money. There is no reason for a person to buy a UPS to power a flat screen or projector. They are only good, if you have a VoIP device & modem for service, which even then the provider has to have some form of back up to power the network, so you can make telephone calls.

OP disregard the UPS suggestion, due to that is a overboard expense for what you want to do, and overkill. The Surge protector as a first layer will do fine, if wanting to go to the next, go with the power conditioner. If you have VoIP or digital phone, only place that device (ie provider router or emta, that allows you to hook a phone up to) on a UPS, so you are able to make and receive telephone calls. If you have a cellphone, then it really would not matter.
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:21 AM   #10
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


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Don't waste your money, buy a UPS.

Most only know when told, by hearsay, how to think subjectively. Subjective facts make the most uneducated into best experts. That subjective reasoning is also called junk science.

If a UPS did protection, then that UPS numeric spec says so. Where is protection defined by the UPS specifications? No number will be posted because, well ... a destructive surge is typically hundreds of thousands of joules. How many joules does that UPS have? Hundreds. Also called near zero.

A UPS in battery backup mode outputs power so 'dirty' as to be harmful to small electric motors and power strip protectors. Most who ignore hard facts and numbers would not know this. For example, this 120 volt sine wave UPS outputs 200 volt square waves with a spike of up to 270 volts. Power that can be harmful to small electric motors. Power that is perfectly ideal for all electronics. Because all electronics are so robust. Because the best protection is already inside electronics.

Same applies to a Wiki quote that says how MOVs work. Quoted text is 100% correct. We who design this stuff must worry about variation between MOVs. Does that mean one MOV absorbs all power while the other does not? Of course not. That conclusion, again, is subjective conclusions created by hearsay. One MOV may only conduct 90% of full current while another might conduct 120%. The text is correct. Conclusion (or fear) is bogus because the conclusion is made without numbers.

Worrying about something stated subjectively is how junk science is promoted. Any conclusion must always be performed quantitatively - with numbers. Any claim made subjectively is how scams get promoted.

That UPS does surge protection. Therefore everyone knows it must do 100% protection. A scam. Because the UPS does near zero protection. Read its numbers. Protection is just enough above zero so that sales brochures, hearsay, and salesmen will hype it as 100% protection.

A single in-line fuse must exist in power strip protectors so that the destructive surge (hundreds of thousands of joules) will disconnect protector parts from AC mains. While leaving the computer, TV, stereo, and projector connected to that surge.

Again, learn the details before assuming subjectively. Will that protector's 2 centimeter part stop what three miles of sky could not? A damning question, with numbers, that anyone can answer if recommending a solution. A superior solution is connected elsewhere and cost less. And is recommended with numbers.
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Old 10-05-2011, 10:47 AM   #11
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


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Most only know when told, by hearsay, how to think subjectively. Subjective facts make the most uneducated into best experts. That subjective reasoning is also called junk science.

If a UPS did protection, then that UPS numeric spec says so. Where is protection defined by the UPS specifications? No number will be posted because, well ... a destructive surge is typically hundreds of thousands of joules. How many joules does that UPS have? Hundreds. Also called near zero.

A UPS in battery backup mode outputs power so 'dirty' as to be harmful to small electric motors and power strip protectors. Most who ignore hard facts and numbers would not know this. For example, this 120 volt sine wave UPS outputs 200 volt square waves with a spike of up to 270 volts. Power that can be harmful to small electric motors. Power that is perfectly ideal for all electronics. Because all electronics are so robust. Because the best protection is already inside electronics.

Same applies to a Wiki quote that says how MOVs work. Quoted text is 100% correct. We who design this stuff must worry about variation between MOVs. Does that mean one MOV absorbs all power while the other does not? Of course not. That conclusion, again, is subjective conclusions created by hearsay. One MOV may only conduct 90% of full current while another might conduct 120%. The text is correct. Conclusion (or fear) is bogus because the conclusion is made without numbers.

Worrying about something stated subjectively is how junk science is promoted. Any conclusion must always be performed quantitatively - with numbers. Any claim made subjectively is how scams get promoted.

That UPS does surge protection. Therefore everyone knows it must do 100% protection. A scam. Because the UPS does near zero protection. Read its numbers. Protection is just enough above zero so that sales brochures, hearsay, and salesmen will hype it as 100% protection.

A single in-line fuse must exist in power strip protectors so that the destructive surge (hundreds of thousands of joules) will disconnect protector parts from AC mains. While leaving the computer, TV, stereo, and projector connected to that surge.

Again, learn the details before assuming subjectively. Will that protector's 2 centimeter part stop what three miles of sky could not? A damning question, with numbers, that anyone can answer if recommending a solution. A superior solution is connected elsewhere and cost less. And is recommended with numbers.
1. I don't mean to be rude, but what makes you the expert? Do you work for a electric company or something to do with electricity?

2. Do you recommend I should get a surge protector than or its useless for my house [I live in a manufactured home]?

3. Also, I am actually not getting the surge protector to protect it from lightning bolts/storm but from power surges [or is that the same thing as lightning bold/storm] and over volting instances

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Old 10-05-2011, 11:24 AM   #12
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


The fact that those of us that have dealt with real life surge protection and large battery bank UPS know the difference. A UPS is only for getting stuff offline, or in cases like telecommunications, to keep stuff online. In large bank systems, the UPS has a box about the size of two large desktops stacked on top of each other, that monitor & smooth out any dirty fluctuations in the power output.

Small size consumer grade UPS are not worth the money, other than as I had stated before regarding keeping the line alive on VoIP, and then you hope your service provider has their game together and has some form of redundant power downstream to keep their system live, so that people can use it to make phone calls.
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Old 10-05-2011, 07:19 PM   #13
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


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1. I don't mean to be rude, but what makes you the expert? Do you work for a electric company or something to do with electricity?
Obviously and yes. Generations of experience including design of protection so that all surges (including a typically most destructive: lightning) cause no damage.


The 'person' should mean nothing; should be irrelevant. Only supporting facts, numbers, and underlying principles mean anything and everything. When it comes to surge protection (which means lightning protection), many relevant concepts were taught in elementary school science.

All appliances contain serious protection. Are you replacing dimmer switches and digital clocks daily? Of course not. Anything that might work on an appliance power wire is already inside appliances - including bathroom and kitchen GFCIs.

Your concern is a surge that can overwhelm that protection. Occurs typically once every seven years; a number that can vary significantly even in every town. Protection to make destructive surges (including lightning) irrelevant also costs less money. Is done as it was done even 100 years ago.

How often is your town without phone service for four days while they replace their $multi-million computer? Overhead wires all over town connect surges directly to that computer. A telco's CO will suffer about 100 surges with each thunderstorm. How often is your town without phone service? Why no damage?

Telcos do what you also do for about $1 per protected appliance. Again, these solutions are provided by more responsible companies that spend little on advertising and more on making superior products. You know these companies for their better reputations. General Electric, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Siemens, Clipsal, and Leviton are but a few. A Cutler-Hammer (Eaton) solution sells in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50.

Minimal 'whole house' protector (that also costs tens or 100 times less money) is rated for 50,000 amps. A typical direct lightning strike is 20,000 amps. Again, "who" is irrelevant. Those technical numbers and other professional sources are the only recommendation worthy of your attention. Don't take my word for it. See those numbers? Learn the concepts.

Protection is always about where energy dissipates. You were taught this in elementary school science on Ben Franklin and lightning rods. Does the rod do protection? Of course not. Either a surge finds earth destructively via your house. Or a surge finds earth harmlessly via an earth ground and its connecting wire. A rod does not do protection. Protection is always provided by what absorbs energy. What so many forget because it is not visible. Either energy is absorbed harmlessly outside. Or you have surge damage. Protection was always that simple.

That was structure protection. When lightning (or other surge sources such as switching) strikes wires far down the street, then lightning is connected directly to every household appliance. How do you protect every appliance (including smoke detectors)? Lightning must be earthed where that wire enters the building. Either that energy dissipates harmlessly outside. Or that energy goes hunting for earth destructively via appliances. The concept is that simple.

Once energy is permitted (or encouraged) inside, then nothing does protection. Nothing. As demonstrated by over 100 years of well proven science. Or did you think a 2 centimeter part inside a magic box stops what three miles of sky could not?

So I ask again. Where is the manufacturer specification that lists protection from each type of surge? Again, does not matter what I or anyone else here says. You read that specification. If it does not specifically claim protection, then it does not do protection.

How many wires enter your building? For example, telephone has two wires. Both must connect to single point earth ground before entering the building. Go to the NID (where telco wires meet yours). Telcos always install a 'whole house' protector with a wire that connects to earth. How many others knew anything about that protection? That protection has existed longer than anyone here. Another example of why "who" is irrelevant. Go view and learn what actually exists. Code and Federal regulations require that protector. Energy earthed before entering the building. What effective protectors do, including that one.

In one venue, a 33,000 volt wire fell upon local distribution. Surge caused hundreds of electric meters to literally explode from their pans. Most had damaged electronics attached to destroyed surge protectors. At least one had destroyed circuit breakers. But my friend knows someone who knows this stuff. He only had one 'whole house' protector properly earthed. His only damage was a severely damaged electric meter. Even the protector remained functional.

To have protection from all surges means your protection must be installed to even make direct lightning strikes irrelevant. Same concepts apply to Ben Franklin's 1752 discovery. Protection is always about where energy dissipates.

How to quickly identify ineffective protection? 1) No dedicated wire for a low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to single point earth. 2) Manufacture avoids all discussion about earthing. 3) Manufacturer will not discuss where energy dissipates.

Everything here can be understood and confirmed by layman. Nothing here is new. Did you know all telephone subscriber interfaces already have an earth 'whole house' protector? Most do not even know that; but will make recommendations anyway.

You should have numerous questions. Introduced is an example of a best, least expensive, and effective solution. More solutions exist. Too many to list without first defining what you actually have.

One more point. A 120 volt surge protector or UPS ignores voltages below 330 volts. Again, you don't care who says that. A let-through voltage is listed on every protector box. Where is protection from 200 volts on a 120 volt appliance? Did someone recommend something by ignoring those numbers?

Any effective solution will always say where hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate. Useful answers are proven by over 100 years of science and experience. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:48 PM   #14
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What kind of surge protector to get for these items


Actually I will mention a UPS too. Why? It will have surge protection built in, and you can plug the computer into it. I'm assuming the computer is hooked up to the TV and you use it to play movies? So if you get a power bump at least the computer will keep playing the movie and you won't lose your spot. You can plug the rest of the equipment into the "surge only" plugs. You can also plug a power bar into the UPS for more plugs.
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Old 10-05-2011, 09:21 PM   #15
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Electronic equipment can be damaged by factors other than spikes or surges filtered by MOV’s. A MOV surge protector actually provides very little protection and can degrade over time and end up providing no protection at all. An induced spike created by lightening is about 10 nano seconds in duration, an MOV’s switch time is about ten milliseconds much to slow to trap that fast a spike. While spikes are one problem that needs to be dealt with, damage can also be caused by voltage sags (think brown outs), and very quick power on/off cycles.

Choosing a proper type of UPS is the key. An "Online" (double conversion) UPS provides continuous power conditioning, and protects computers, modems, electronic equipment and fax machines by “cleaning up” and regulating voltage, guarding against surges, spikes, voltage sags and power failures that can cause your equipment to fail. In the locations we installed our equipment that did get a direct lightening strike, the front end of the UPS was blown but none of the electronic equipment connected was damaged.
 

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