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Old 07-11-2009, 06:59 PM   #1
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What does x and y mean?


Does x mean 120v hot and y mean 240v hot? This is what I'm guessing, but just want to check to make sure. I'm going to be installing a dryer plug and I know where ground and neutral go as they are marked, and ground is quite obvious just by the shape alone, but the other two line terminals are just labeled x and y.

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Old 07-11-2009, 07:03 PM   #2
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What does x and y mean?


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Does x mean 120v hot and y mean 240v hot? This is what I'm guessing, but just want to check to make sure. I'm going to be installing a dryer plug and I know where ground and neutral go as they are marked, and ground is quite obvious just by the shape alone, but the other two line terminals are just labeled x and y.
That's just the marking indicating a "phase" wire. In other words, one hot wire in X, and the other hot wire in Y. If it was three phase it would be X, Y, and Z. It doesn't matter which hot goes to what terminal on that dryer receptacle.

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Old 07-11-2009, 07:08 PM   #3
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What does x and y mean?


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Old 07-11-2009, 07:16 PM   #4
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What does x and y mean?


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That's just the marking indicating a "phase" wire. In other words, one hot wire in X, and the other hot wire in Y. If it was three phase it would be X, Y, and Z. It doesn't matter which hot goes to what terminal on that dryer receptacle.
I was wondering if I could put either or, but then figured there must be a right way. Guess it does not really matter as they're both hot anyway, and from each end it's 240 volt anyway, and from one of the ends to top (neutral) is 120 right? So basically same as oven.
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Old 07-11-2009, 07:54 PM   #5
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What does x and y mean?


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I was wondering if I could put either or, but then figured there must be a right way. Guess it does not really matter as they're both hot anyway, and from each end it's 240 volt anyway, and from one of the ends to top (neutral) is 120 right? So basically same as oven.
Yes. Single phase equipment doesn't know, and doesn't care which wire is which.
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Old 07-11-2009, 07:54 PM   #6
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What does x and y mean?


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5 cm. But I'm glad you found it.
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Old 07-11-2009, 08:26 PM   #7
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What does x and y mean?


Good answer. I guess that explains the F you got in geometry class.

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Old 07-11-2009, 08:47 PM   #8
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What does x and y mean?


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5 cm. But I'm glad you found it.
OK, but what's that called?
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Old 07-11-2009, 08:58 PM   #9
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What does x and y mean?


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OK, but what's that called?
A line.

Actually think there's a term for it, I forget. Think it's like hypotenuse or something like that.

Math is not my thing.
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Old 07-11-2009, 09:38 PM   #10
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What does x and y mean?


Go back and watch the "Wizard of Oz" movie, and catch the scene right after the scarecrow obtains his brain. His response is to try to recite the pythagorean theorem..... albeit incorrectly ....
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Old 07-11-2009, 09:48 PM   #11
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What does x and y mean?


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Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
Does x mean 120v hot and y mean 240v hot? This is what I'm guessing, but just want to check to make sure. I'm going to be installing a dryer plug and I know where ground and neutral go as they are marked, and ground is quite obvious just by the shape alone, but the other two line terminals are just labeled x and y.
When installing a NEMA 14-30 device, such as your dryer receptacle, the terminals should be marked W X Y and G.

If you were installing a NEMA 15-30 device, which does not have a neutral, the terminals would be marked X Y Z and G.

In each case, the X Y or Z terminals designate "hot" lines. The use of W indicates a white or neutral connection, and G always is for the grounding connection.
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Old 07-11-2009, 09:49 PM   #12
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That's it.
Bonus points for the W of Oz reference.
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Old 07-11-2009, 10:02 PM   #13
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What does x and y mean?


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That's it.
Bonus points for the W of Oz reference.
That's how we all knew that the Wizard was a fraud. And as Professor Marvel, he was luring little girls into his trailer for "fortune telling. Hmmm...
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Old 07-12-2009, 08:47 AM   #14
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http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
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Old 07-12-2009, 04:59 PM   #15
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What does x and y mean?


It's imperative that the two hot wires be connected to the proper x and y terminal. If they are connected incorrectly, the dryer will work in reverse and blow cold air instead of hot. If you find your clothes frozen stiff as a board reverse the two wires. That is why virtually all freezers and refrigerators are 115 volts. Only one way to wire them up. Otherwise half the people would wire them backwards and cook the stored food rather than preserve it. No need to thank me for providing this information. I've learned so much from others here on this forum I'm just happy to be able to return the favor.


Last edited by Mike in Arkansas; 07-12-2009 at 05:02 PM.
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