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Old 09-13-2012, 08:57 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
should say
"some breakers accomodate this"
I beleive you call them type two breakers.
They are in essence a slow blow type breaker,
used for loads that have a turn on surge such as motors
and transformers.
Normal house hold breakers are fast blow types.
different.
maybe maybe not. i am only aware of one type for my panel type (CH CH style). The same 30A breaker type used to start a 240V a/c compressor is used for non large motor draw loads like electric water heater or dryer

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Old 09-13-2012, 09:28 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by electures

Does it have a factory plug and what does it look like?
Not any more...,,,I've switched it over to a 6-15 nema plug....since I couldn't run it on the 110, I switched it over to 220.
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:29 PM   #33
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A lot of the guys over the woodworking site thought that dust collectors need to be on 20 amp circuits here's the motor for my dust collector it will be the only thing on the circuit is a 15 amp circuit with 14 gage wire big enough?
According to the tables in Article 430 2011 NEC the motor draws 20A @ 120V. The wiring has to be #10. The breaker can be as high as 50A, but I would size it just large enough to allow the motor to start and run. Mabe a 30A breaker. Does it have a standard 120V plug on the cord or is it hard wired?
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Old 09-13-2012, 11:19 PM   #34
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It was a standard 110 plug, the motor plate has 12 amps printed on it and the cord that came on it from the factory was 14 gauge, why would I need 10 gauge wire and a 30 amp breaker???
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Old 09-13-2012, 11:40 PM   #35
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So i went over to my favorite tool store tonight......where they happened to have the same dust collector......brought my amp clamp and tested out theirs.......keeping in mind mine drew 80+ amps......and theirs drew 40.5 amps at start up........

Mine draws the 12 amps its rated at once its running.....as did theirs.......

Any motor guys out there that have any other ideas???
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Old 09-14-2012, 06:01 AM   #36
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Sounds like either the motor is binding (or something else) or a capacitor is failing. As far as I know you can test a capacitor like a battery and get good readings but the real test is under load. So the only sure fire way is a capacitor tester or swap with a known good one. How easily does the whole works spin by hand?
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:40 PM   #37
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It was a standard 110 plug, the motor plate has 12 amps printed on it and the cord that came on it from the factory was 14 gauge, why would I need 10 gauge wire and a 30 amp breaker???
Because it is a motor. I copied this from the manual;

CONNECTING TOOL TO POWER SOURCE
POWER CONNECTIONS
A separate electrical circuit should be used for your tools. This circuit should not be less than #12 wire and should be protected with a 20 Amp time lag fuse. Have a qualified electrician repair or replace damaged or worn cord immediately. Before connecting the motor to the power line, make certain the switch is in the “OFF” position and be sure that the electric current is of the same characteristics as stamped on the motor nameplate. All line connections should make good contact. Running on low voltage will damage the motor.

SInce the motor doesn't run continuosly, I would follow the manual. Note the 20A time delay fuse. This will allow the motor to start and run.
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:45 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasperST
How easily does the whole works spin by hand?
spins like on glass.
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Old 09-14-2012, 05:55 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post
Because it is a motor. I copied this from the manual;

CONNECTING TOOL TO POWER SOURCE
POWER CONNECTIONS
A separate electrical circuit should be used for your tools. This circuit should not be less than #12 wire and should be protected with a 20 Amp time lag fuse. Have a qualified electrician repair or replace damaged or worn cord immediately. Before connecting the motor to the power line, make certain the switch is in the “OFF” position and be sure that the electric current is of the same characteristics as stamped on the motor nameplate. All line connections should make good contact. Running on low voltage will damage the motor.


SInce the motor doesn't run continuosly, I would follow the manual. Note the 20A time delay fuse. This will allow the motor to start and run.

NOTICE !
how they recommend a "time lag fuse" !
If you want to use breakers thats fine,
but you must use the equivilent,
which is a time lag breaker !

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