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-   -   What is Code/Best Practices for Running a 240V cable to other Side of Room? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/what-code-best-practices-running-240v-cable-other-side-room-167927/)

imautoparts 01-01-2013 10:45 AM

What is Code/Best Practices for Running a 240V cable to other Side of Room?
 
I need to move a 240V junction box from one side of the room (it used to feed a heater circuit) to the other. I presume this means I'll have to fish wire from the wallbox on the North wall up and over in the attic to the new box on the South wall.

What is code/best practice for this? Can I use heavy duty romex or do I have to enclose the wire in a tube of some kind? Any other tips?

Speedy Petey 01-01-2013 10:54 AM

What do you mean by "heavy duty" romex? Never heard that term before.

Just use the same cable as the circuit and an appropriately sized junction box. If the existing box is big enough just bring the new wire into that and splice there.

diystephen 01-01-2013 10:58 AM

Is this a continuation of this thread?

http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/so-su...7/#post1082557

oh'mike 01-01-2013 11:00 AM

Speedy Petey---have the codes remained the same over the years? Does the new circuit need four wires? two power one neutral and a ground?

k_buz 01-01-2013 11:02 AM

It would depend on the load. Many 240V loads do not require a neutral. You are thinking of sub panel codes.

For sub panels, the codes have "recently" changed regarding detached structures, but the 4th wire (EGC) for subs in the same structure have remained the same for as long as I can remember.

Jim Port 01-01-2013 11:12 AM

Mike, if the code has changed like for stoves and dryers, if the circuit needs to be changed it needs to be brought up to todays code.

George6488 01-01-2013 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1083867)
It would depend on the load. Many 240V loads do not require a neutral. You are thinking of sub panel codes.

For sub panels, the codes have "recently" changed regarding detached structures, but the 4th wire (EGC) for subs in the same structure have remained the same for as long as I can remember.


Please elaborate on change as I am setting up a sub-panel later this week and have the 4 wires already.

Thanks

Speedy Petey 01-01-2013 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1083866)
Speedy Petey---have the codes remained the same over the years? Does the new circuit need four wires? two power one neutral and a ground?

Like the others have said, it depends on the circuit and the load. The whole "the code has changed for '220' " thing is a complete mis-nomer.

The only thing that has changed is that circuits for detached structure feeders and for household cooking appliances and electric dryers are not allowed to use the neutral to also serve as the grounding means. This is ONLY for 120/240v circuits. A straight 240v circuit would not apply since it does not utilize a neutral conductor.

George6488 01-01-2013 11:51 AM

Thanks:)

imautoparts 01-01-2013 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diystephen (Post 1083864)
Is this a continuation of this thread?

http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/so-su...7/#post1082557


No, this is for me. In my utility room I'm wanting to move the dryer from one wall to the other.

The realtor can take his own risks - but not with my skin or liability.

Speedy Petey 01-01-2013 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imautoparts (Post 1084025)
No, this is for me. In my utility room I'm wanting to move the dryer from one wall to the other.

Then why not say this from the start, as opposed to vaguely saying you "need to move a 240V junction box" and asking if you should use "heavy duty romex"? This little detail would have eliminated confusion and cleared things up.

imautoparts 01-01-2013 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 1084030)
Then why not say this from the start, as opposed to vaguely saying you "need to move a 240V junction box" and asking if you should use "heavy duty romex"? This little detail would have eliminated confusion and cleared things up.


Well, I'm not moving the junction box for the dryer. I'm using a separate 20A 240 circuit that I'm pulling from a thermostat/spst junction box that used to feed a large baseboard heater in the same room. That way I'll still have 240V on the original wall, plus 240V on a new circuit on the garage wall. I'm thinking that may come in handy sometime as I am looking at buying a big air compressor and two 240V outlets on separate circuits will be just what I need.

k_buz 01-01-2013 02:58 PM

Running an electric dryer on a 20A circuit? :no:

Speedy Petey 01-01-2013 03:00 PM

So you are NOT moving your dryer from one wall to the other like you said in post #10???
I'm confused.

k_buz 01-01-2013 03:00 PM

Me too


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