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Old 08-24-2009, 02:44 PM   #1
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Weatherhead confusion


I currently have a service running down an existing weatherhead to a pair of 100 A breakers on the panel on the pole.

I'm going to install a flood light on the pole (yes I have permission to do this, don't worry ) However to run power up to the floodlight, I need a new weatherhead. So the plan was to install a new weatherhead to a 20A breaker for the light. However, I'm a little confused on what I've been told concerning weatherheads.

I understand I need a new one, because I can't have the 20A running in the same as the 100's. Is the new weatherhead supposed to house all of this and keep it separated? Or do I need to have 2 weatherheads? and the second/new one running into the 20A?

Any help would be great! And let me know if you think I'm missing something!

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Old 08-24-2009, 03:00 PM   #2
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Weatherhead confusion


Your use of the term weatherhead is a little out of context. Your service conductors enter the 'weatherhead' which is the cap on the end of the conduit running up the pole. Like below image...




All you need is a separate pvc conduit coming out of the panel at the bottom of the pole and going up the pole to the flood light enclosure. Pvc would be my choice as a diy.


Branch circuit conductors are not allowed to share the same raceway with the service entrance conductors.

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Old 08-24-2009, 03:04 PM   #3
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Weatherhead confusion


Ok so the "weatherhead" is strictly the cap atop everything. The one it has right now is wider and rectangular, but I think I know enough at this point I can run conduit from the space I need up to the light, and then put a smaller round weatherhead as you have shown atop the conduit, leaving a loop for dripping and then hit my light.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:17 PM   #4
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Weatherhead confusion


Are you saying that your splices for the light will just be hanging up there in free air?
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:34 PM   #5
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Weatherhead confusion


Quote:
I'm a little confused on what I've been told concerning weatherheads.
A little confused?

Forget about weatherheads.

You need to run conduit from the the circuit breaker side of the panel, up the pole to a junction box and mount your light on the jbox.

I sense danger.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:43 PM   #6
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Weatherhead confusion


Well my electric supply company quoted me a bracket to mount the light with. We're looking at a 65 lb light. Is that going to mount on a junction box? I figured I'd be best off with a weatherhead, but if I'm completely wrong please do tell me so.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:47 PM   #7
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Weatherhead confusion


@ 65 pounds, you'd better thru bolt it.

The light will likely have a cord attached to it and you would run the cord into the JB.

No weatherheads are involved.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:51 PM   #8
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Weatherhead confusion


I thought the cord is what I was running down into the weatherhead/conduit. I guess I'm not quite versed enough to get the finer works of this. I'm currently just getting a cost worked up so I know what I'm stepping into. I do plan on knowing my wiring after I've pinned down what the materials I'll be using are.

So cord to Jbox, Jbox to conduit, to the breaker. This makes sense. Thank you!
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:55 PM   #9
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Weatherhead confusion


Quote:
So cord to Jbox, Jbox to conduit, to the breaker
Don't forget the wires in the conduit
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:59 PM   #10
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Weatherhead confusion


haha, yes, I DO realize that much.
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Old 08-24-2009, 04:46 PM   #11
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Weatherhead confusion


Hey do you have a link to your light I'd just like to see the thing....
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:27 AM   #12
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Weatherhead confusion


http://www.acuitybrandslighting.com/...ts/TFA-M-S.pdf

Thats the cut sheet for it
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:28 PM   #13
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Weatherhead confusion


Nice light. I thought it must be an MH with a ballast to weigh 65 pounds. It only needs 4.6 amps at 240 volts or 9.6 amps 120 volts with a maximum 1000w watt bulb. 14 awg thwn will work fine in a conduit up the pole. The cut sheet shows twist lock cord and plug. Might want to think about ease of servicing in the event the fixture needs to come down and wire accordingly. I dont think I would plug the thing. If I was concerned about needing to get the fixture down someday I would hit a weathertite junction box (make splices here) with the conduit at the top and run a short lenght of weathertite flex from the jb to the light.

I'd make my own bracket to set the light off the pole some.
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Last edited by Stubbie; 08-25-2009 at 01:36 PM.
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:40 PM   #14
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Weatherhead confusion


This system will never ever come down. except in demolition.
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:57 PM   #15
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Weatherhead confusion


Where we live the power company installs the light and charges us $12.00 a month to keep it working.
They do not use weatherheads either. They just tap the service conductors with a small drip loop. Yep, no OCPD.

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