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01grander 08-13-2012 01:55 PM

Water Heater Electrical Requirements
 
I got a free water heater from my electric company and am trying to install it. My weak point(more like no clue) is the electrical part of the installation. I was installing it in a utility room that has 2 220V plugs.

Is there a way to use that plug or the wiring from that plug to hardwire the water heater? I just spent a fortune upgrading the wiring and I didn't think about this when they were out because I was going to get gas.

MisterZ 08-13-2012 02:11 PM

I would say hard wire it. Are the recepticles 30amp?

01grander 08-13-2012 02:22 PM

Yeah, it is. I'm trying to cheat the system somewhat. My electric company offers a free water heater and my gas company offers $800 to switch to a tankless. I'm trying to get this up so my electrical company is happy and then converting to a tankless.

I may end up keeping the electrical heater if it is sufficient though. My box is full and the electrical company wanted $1000 to add a subpanel.

MisterZ 08-13-2012 02:40 PM

Well if the recepticle is near the water heater, you could remove it and put in a junction box.
Then run 10/3 from j box to water heater.

If the panel is nearby, it would be best to run new 10/3 from the existing 30amp 2 pole breaker.

01grander 08-13-2012 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisterZ (Post 987646)
Well if the recepticle is near the water heater, you could remove it and put in a junction box.
Then run 10/3 from j box to water heater.

If the panel is nearby, it would be best to run new 10/3 from the existing 30amp 2 pole breaker.


Is there a safe way to add more of the same wire so that I have enough from the j box to the water heater? It's new wiring so I'd be able to get the exact same wire but as far as connecting them. On my jeep I'd use electrical tape but obviously you would not use that in this situation.

MisterZ 08-13-2012 03:49 PM

Yes, it should be #10/3. That is two hots, one grounding conductor, and bare ground. 4 wires, black red white bare.
Get the length you need to run from the j box to the water heater. Obiously not straight, the wire must be secured from A to B.

Yah, black tape is not sufficient. Use proper sized wire nuts instead.
Also if the j box is metal you must attach a piece fo bare copper to a ground screw(sold separately) on the metal box.
Then twist together this "pigtail" with the other two bare copper wires, and nut them.

When nutting wires, use linesman or needlenose pliers to twist them together first.
Simply putting a wire nut on is not sufficient to hold wires together.

wirenut1110 08-13-2012 03:51 PM

A water heater should only need a 10/2.

k_buz 08-13-2012 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wirenut1110 (Post 987705)
A water heater should only need a 10/2.

and a disconnect if not within sight of the panel

rjniles 08-13-2012 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisterZ (Post 987701)
When nutting wires, use linesman or needlenose pliers to twist them together first.
Simply putting a wire nut on is not sufficient to hold wires together.

You will get more than a few different opinions on that comment. BTW I twist but many do not.

Canucker 08-13-2012 04:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 987725)
You will get more than a few different opinions on that comment.

After we're done with that debate, can we go to the plumbing section and ask if the toilet flange should be flush with the finished floor or on top?:laughing:

stickboy1375 08-13-2012 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisterZ (Post 987701)

Simply putting a wire nut on is not sufficient to hold wires together.

Actually it is. :) Most wire nuts do not require pre-twisting, and to prove it to yourself, twist one on without pre twisting and then remove the wire nut, you will be impressed how nice it came out. :)

BTW, I twist sometimes, usually out of habit from being in the trade (x) amount of years.

MisterZ 08-13-2012 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 987797)
Actually it is. :) Most wire nuts do not require pre-twisting, and to prove it to yourself, twist one on without pre twisting and then remove the wire nut, you will be impressed how nice it came out. :)

BTW, I twist sometimes, usually out of habit from being in the trade (x) amount of years.

I agree with you. I like to throw that in for noobs in case they use junk nuts, or dont nut wires well. Especially on a hot water heater.
Glad u guys chimed in anyway:)

stickboy1375 08-13-2012 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisterZ (Post 987837)
I agree with you. I like to throw that in for noobs in case they use junk nuts, or dont nut wires well. Especially on a hot water heater.
Glad u guys chimed in anyway:)

Funny... but I agree with your logic. :)


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