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patrick584 08-31-2012 10:36 PM

Wall oven microwave combo
 
I am replacing a microwave wall oven combo with a separate microwave and wall oven in the same space. The old unit was wired on a 240/120 combo 30a circuit with 10-3wg. The original wall oven had an outlet on the unit that the microwave plugged into, and obviously the new single wall oven does not have this outlet. My plan is to get a new box and 120v outlet. I will wire the oven the same as the original except I will add additional wires to the wire nuts for one of the hot wires, the neutral wire, and the ground wire. I will connect these to the outlet that will be used for the microwave. Will this work, and is this the best way to do this? Can I use 12 gauge wire for this microwave outlet?
Thanks

k_buz 08-31-2012 10:45 PM

You will have to refer to the manufacturer specs. I'm guessing that the range will require a 30A 240V circuit and the micro will require its own 20A 120V circuit.

patrick584 09-01-2012 12:20 AM

I agree the wall oven will need its own 30A circuit which is already setup. The microwave will not be mounted and will be freestanding on a shelf. I have heard that non-mounted microwaves don't need dedicated circuits, and can be used on the 20A general counter circuits. Can I add a box to this circuit that will be located behind the microwave? Is there a limit to how many receptacles can be on this 20A circuit?

kevinp22 09-01-2012 11:40 PM

There is no limit to the number of receptacles but they can only kitchen, pantry and dining room loads and no lighting loads.

you can put the microwave on this circuit and can install a receptacle convenient to plugging in the microwave.

ba cautious though. what is the wattage on the microwave. If its large (1200W or larger) a dedicated circuit would be a good idea, IMO

Rochsolid 09-02-2012 10:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinp22
There is no limit to the number of receptacles but they can only kitchen, pantry and dining room loads and no lighting loads.

you can put the microwave on this circuit and can install a receptacle convenient to plugging in the microwave.

ba cautious though. what is the wattage on the microwave. If its large (1200W or larger) a dedicated circuit would be a good idea, IMO

There Ina limit to receptacles that you can put on a single circuit. 15amp breaker= 12 15 amp receptacles. I would suggest that you put your microwave on its own dedicated circuit. 20amp breaker, 12/2 wire and a 20 amp t-slot recepatcle

jbfan 09-02-2012 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rochsolid (Post 1001965)
There Ina limit to receptacles that you can put on a single circuit. 15amp breaker= 12 15 amp receptacles. I would suggest that you put your microwave on its own dedicated circuit. 20amp breaker, 12/2 wire and a 20 amp t-slot recepatcle

Not in the US.
15 amp receptacles are fine on a 20 amp breaker, and 20 amp receptacles are not required.

frenchelectrican 09-02-2012 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 1001993)
Not in the US.
15 amp receptacles are fine on a 20 amp breaker, and 20 amp receptacles are not required.

As long it is 15 amp duplex that is fine on 20 amp breaker but 15 amp singleplex now that is differnt story.

The 15 amp singleplex will have to match the breaker size so if you have 15 amp singleplex then use 15 amp breaker but if you have 20 amp singleplex then you can use 20 amp breaker.

Merci,
Marc


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