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paul braithwait 04-09-2011 07:33 AM

wall lights help
 
what seemed a simple job has turned out not to be.Can someone help with these two questions please.Firstly is it ok to run wall lights from a socket via a fused spur,ie socket-fs-switch-lights,and if this is all thats required a simple wiring diagram or explanation perhaps.
Many thanks,paul.

tcleve4911 04-09-2011 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul braithwait (Post 625988)
fused spur,ie socket-fs-switch-lights,and if this is all thats required a simple wiring diagram or explanation perhaps.

Hi Paul
One of the challenges on the forums is translating to us what you're addressing.

People call rafters = joists.
Concrete=cement
GFCI=breakers.

So help us help you.
Fused spur = ?
socket-fs-switch-lights = ?

DangerMouse 04-09-2011 07:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 625995)
Hi Paul
One of the challenges on the forums is translating to us what you're addressing.

I dare say sometimes it's the BIGGEST challenge.
Please try to remember to use the space bar between sentences.

DM

paul braithwait 04-09-2011 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 625995)
Hi Paul
One of the challenges on the forums is translating to us what you're addressing.

People call rafters = joists.
Concrete=cement
GFCI=breakers.

So help us help you.
Fused spur = ?
socket-fs-switch-lights = ?

thanks for the quick response,please accept my appologies for not explaining well.
i didnt wish to take power from a light circuit and was "advised" that to take power from a socket i would have to include a fused spur. This i have done so in effect i have a fuse in line from socket to switch.However i`m not sure if this is adequate and am confused as to the wiring layout.
regards paul.

tcleve4911 04-09-2011 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul braithwait (Post 626003)
i didnt wish to take power from a light circuit and was "advised" that to take power from a socket i would have to include a fused spur. This i have done so in effect i have a fuse in line from socket to switch.
regards paul.

Socket = outlet Y/N
Fused spur = GFCI Y/N

paul braithwait 04-09-2011 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 626006)
Socket = outlet Y/N
Fused spur = GFCI Y/N

outlet yes
GFCI no

Thanks

bob22 04-09-2011 11:31 AM

Paul, where are you located?
I don't understand the fused spur term. I'm guessing it is a continuation of the wiring from an outlet with a fuse in it?
I have no idea how that is done; would be interested in how these are fused.
You should be able to run a line from an outlet (they've two sets of screws for this purpose) and run them to the new lights (there are some rooms, kitchen for one, where you should not do this).
Some more info might help.

paul braithwait 04-09-2011 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob22 (Post 626122)
Paul, where are you located?
I don't understand the fused spur term. I'm guessing it is a continuation of the wiring from an outlet with a fuse in it?
I have no idea how that is done; would be interested in how these are fused.
You should be able to run a line from an outlet (they've two sets of screws for this purpose) and run them to the new lights (there are some rooms, kitchen for one, where you should not do this).
Some more info might help.

hi,
we are located in castleford w yorkshire.
The term fused spur is as you think a line from an outlet to a fuse located in a box,same size as a wall switch,the fuse is located in a tray that pops in/out.
The lights are in our living room.

regards paul.

bob22 04-10-2011 09:39 AM

I've no clue about UK systems; best to wait for Marc who may know.

joed 04-10-2011 09:46 AM

Most of the people here from North America. We have no real clue about the ring circuits etc. used in UK. There is one member (Freenchelectrician) who is from you side or the pond and will likely be able assist you when he stops by.

dmxtothemax 04-10-2011 05:19 PM

I dont think that taking power for lights from a power circuit
is the correct or right way to do it.
And my guess is that it would not be up to code.
Because in the future someone who has to work on that light
would asume that it is powered from the lighting circuits,
and so you can see the danger there.
All lights should come from lighting circuits,
not power circuits.

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob22 (Post 626122)
Paul, where are you located?
I don't understand the fused spur term. I'm guessing it is a continuation of the wiring from an outlet with a fuse in it?
I have no idea how that is done; would be interested in how these are fused.
You should be able to run a line from an outlet (they've two sets of screws for this purpose) and run them to the new lights (there are some rooms, kitchen for one, where you should not do this).
Some more info might help.


bob22 04-10-2011 07:30 PM

"I dont think that taking power for lights from a power circuit
is the correct or right way to do it.
And my guess is that it would not be up to code.
Because in the future someone who has to work on that light
would asume that it is powered from the lighting circuits,
and so you can see the danger there.
All lights should come from lighting circuits,
not power circuits."

To me, it doesn't matter the source of electricity, if you don't check the fixture or receptacle for current before working on it, Darwinism kicks into effect. Cutting the power by the appropriate circuit breaker or fuse is the only safe way to do things.

frenchelectrican 04-10-2011 11:37 PM

Thanks guys for mentioning my name,


OK., The OP is from UK area the key word is spurs that is giveaway word to moi.

Ok to OP do you have ring spur or radial spur ? if you have fused power points or sockets then you have ring spur typically used with power points or sockets.

It will be very tricky to deal with ring but radial spurs are very easy to deal.

If you have 16 or 24 ( 20 ) amp fuse or breaker then you have radial but if you have 32 amp fuse or breaker then you have ring circuit.

Check that part first to confirm which type of breaker or fuse you have.

Once you got that part done.

To extend it just keep in your mind the conductor colours are diffrent so the red is active while black is netural while new colour codes is Brown is active while the Bleu is netural so keep in your mind with the connections so PLEASE pay attetion to the connection conversation when you hook up to the older circuit colour format.

Oh yeah the otherthing IIRC with new codes you will need a rcd breaker as well or upfitting { upgrading } from fuse to breakers.

The conductor size typically are 2.5mm˛ on 16 amp circuit but if want to use on 20 or 24 amp circuit you have to use 4.0mm˛ conductors.

Merci,
Marc

2.5mm˛=14 awg
4.0mm˛=12 awg

paul braithwait 04-11-2011 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frenchelectrican (Post 627106)
Thanks guys for mentioning my name,


OK., The OP is from UK area the key word is spurs that is giveaway word to moi.

Ok to OP do you have ring spur or radial spur ? if you have fused power points or sockets then you have ring spur typically used with power points or sockets.

It will be very tricky to deal with ring but radial spurs are very easy to deal.

If you have 16 or 24 ( 20 ) amp fuse or breaker then you have radial but if you have 32 amp fuse or breaker then you have ring circuit.

Check that part first to confirm which type of breaker or fuse you have.

Once you got that part done.

To extend it just keep in your mind the conductor colours are diffrent so the red is active while black is netural while new colour codes is Brown is active while the Bleu is netural so keep in your mind with the connections so PLEASE pay attetion to the connection conversation when you hook up to the older circuit colour format.

Oh yeah the otherthing IIRC with new codes you will need a rcd breaker as well or upfitting { upgrading } from fuse to breakers.

The conductor size typically are 2.5mm˛ on 16 amp circuit but if want to use on 20 or 24 amp circuit you have to use 4.0mm˛ conductors.

Merci,
Marc

2.5mm˛=14 awg
4.0mm˛=12 awg

thank you for the informative reply,very much appreciated.
If i need further assisstance i will contact you if thats ok?

kind regards paul.

frenchelectrican 04-11-2011 11:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul braithwait (Post 627342)
thank you for the informative reply,very much appreciated.
If i need further assisstance i will contact you if thats ok?

kind regards paul.

Please do if you run into any issue.

Merci,
Marc


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