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Old 01-19-2009, 07:27 PM   #1
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


I moved into a new house and I want to connect VOIP through the regular phone lines that is currently installed in the house. The phone lines that is sticking out at the side of the house is not connected to any phone company. The only thing i see outside the house is couple of wires sticking out. I believe its for each room that has a phone jack.

What should I do so that I can enable VOIP service through these existing phone jack. I"m currently using Vonage.

Any help would be greatly helpful.

thank,
Jon

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Old 01-19-2009, 08:33 PM   #2
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


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Originally Posted by kirridam View Post
What should I do so that I can enable VOIP service through these existing phone jack. I"m currently using Vonage.
The interesting thing about VoIP is that there is not just one way to place a call. There are three different "flavors" of VoIP service in common use today:
  • ATA -- The simplest and most common way is through the use of a device called an ATA (analog telephone adaptor). The ATA allows you to connect a standard phone to your computer or your Internet connection for use with VoIP. The ATA is an analog-to-digital converter. It takes the analog signal from your traditional phone and converts it into digital data for transmission over the Internet. Providers like Vonage and AT&T CallVantage are bundling ATAs free with their service. You simply crack the ATA out of the box, plug the cable from your phone that would normally go in the wall socket into the ATA, and you're ready to make VoIP calls. Some ATAs may ship with additional software that is loaded onto the host computer to configure it; but in any case, it's a very straightforward setup.
  • IP Phones -- These specialized phones look just like normal phones with a handset, cradle and buttons. But instead of having the standard RJ-11 phone connectors, IP phones have an RJ-45 Ethernet connector. IP phones connect directly to your router and have all the hardware and software necessary right onboard to handle the IP call. Wi-Fi phones allow subscribing callers to make VoIP calls from any Wi-Fi hot spot.
  • Computer-to-computer -- This is certainly the easiest way to use VoIP. You don't even have to pay for long-distance calls. There are several companies offering free or very low-cost software that you can use for this type of VoIP. All you need is the software, a microphone, speakers, a sound card and an Internet connection, preferably a fast one like you would get through a cable or DSL modem. Except for your normal monthly ISP fee, there is usually no charge for computer-to-computer calls, no matter the distance.

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Old 01-19-2009, 10:00 PM   #3
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


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Originally Posted by kirridam View Post
I moved into a new house and I want to connect VOIP through the regular phone lines that is currently installed in the house. The phone lines that is sticking out at the side of the house is not connected to any phone company. The only thing i see outside the house is couple of wires sticking out. I believe its for each room that has a phone jack.

What should I do so that I can enable VOIP service through these existing phone jack. I"m currently using Vonage.

Any help would be greatly helpful.

thank,
Jon
You will need to ensure that there is no connection to any phone company lines. Once you have verified that; then make sure you have any additional wires connected together matching the colors. If you have traditional 4 color wire system (Red, Green, Black, Yellow) and newer 8 wire system (Orange, Blue, Green, Brown pair) match the wires as follows:

Red - Blue
Green - Wh/Blue
Yellow - Orange
Black - Wh/Orange

Disregard the Brown and Green pairs in the 8 wire cable.

Once you have connected all the wires for your house side wiring together, you should in theory be able to pick up the phone any where in the house with your vonage line plugged into any phone jack.

Report back if you have any issues with getting this working. Ive done quite a bit of residential phone wiring connecting my own VOIP system. Though I have a Cable Company provided phone line tied into the traditional phones and an ATA with the second line of the traditional phone system also tied into the ATA all working through an IP PBX with a couple IP phones.
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Old 01-20-2009, 03:57 AM   #4
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


The wires are not connected to any phone companies. I'll have to check and see what kind of wiring (8 or 4) is being used. Where should I match the wires? Should it be outside the house, where couple of wires are sticking out?



Will let you know how it goes.

Thanks,
Jon
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Old 01-20-2009, 07:11 AM   #5
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


If all your wiring goes to the telco demarc box outside then yes that is where you would make all your connections at. Usually there is one or two cables that connect to the telco box outside and the rest of the connections are made inside, but each installer does it differently. Just as a suggestion, don't use wire nuts. Get the gel-filled crimp connects for the phone wiring and a pair of pliers to crimp them down good and tight. A small pack of 25 3 port crimps is less than 5 bucks at Home Depot, they connect 3 wires together. Depending on how many wires you have to connect, you may need some extra wire to connect multiple crimps for each color wire. Also, it wouldnt be a bad idea to leave some pigtails off the bundle of wires to eventually tie into the telco line if you ever decide to switch or for future homeowners. Just make sure you insulate the ends of the wires, usually the best way is just to use some spare crimp connectors and crimp them down on the ends to protect and cap the wire.
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Old 01-20-2009, 07:19 AM   #6
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


A picture of your telco box outside would certainly help. Is this a new house?

I used to have vonage, now have digital phone through the cable company, but the premise of wiring is the same. All I did was disconnect the incoming phone cable that came from the pole and disconnect it from the telco box. Then, ran a cord from the phone jack from the back of the vonage router to a standard house phone jack, which "energized" so to speak all the other phone jacks in the house.
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Old 01-20-2009, 07:33 AM   #7
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I had considered getting Vonage, then the cable company was offering the digital phone service and its so much better than vonage. It doesn't share the network bandwidth through my cable modem with the data traffic, it gets its own coax cable connection and doesn't affect internet bandwidth (and vice versa, internet usage never affects call quality).
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Old 01-20-2009, 07:38 AM   #8
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I had considered getting Vonage, then the cable company was offering the digital phone service and its so much better than vonage. It doesn't share the network bandwidth through my cable modem with the data traffic, it gets its own coax cable connection and doesn't affect internet bandwidth (and vice versa, internet usage never affects call quality).
I never had a problem with that. If it werent for the fact that I got rid of internet at home I would have stuck with vonage because of the price.
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:14 PM   #9
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


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You will need to ensure that there is no connection to any phone company lines. Once you have verified that; then make sure you have any additional wires connected together matching the colors. If you have traditional 4 color wire system (Red, Green, Black, Yellow) and newer 8 wire system (Orange, Blue, Green, Brown pair) match the wires as follows:

Red - Blue
Green - Wh/Blue
Yellow - Orange
Black - Wh/Orange

Disregard the Brown and Green pairs in the 8 wire cable.

Once you have connected all the wires for your house side wiring together, you should in theory be able to pick up the phone any where in the house with your vonage line plugged into any phone jack.

Report back if you have any issues with getting this working. Ive done quite a bit of residential phone wiring connecting my own VOIP system. Though I have a Cable Company provided phone line tied into the traditional phones and an ATA with the second line of the traditional phone system also tied into the ATA all working through an IP PBX with a couple IP phones.
theatretch85,

I'm attaching an image that shows the wires at the side of the house. It hasn't been connected to anything yet. Do you still want me to do it as you have mentioned above?

Thanks,
John
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Old 01-27-2009, 08:32 PM   #10
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


If that is the case, then there has not been a NID (Network Interface) placed on the building. Until that is done, your wiring will not interconnect. When using VoIP, you plug the outlet for the Telephone on the device into a phone jack, then let it backfeed all other jacks to allow any phone in the house to use the device.

At this point, if going with VoIP, you just need a Broadband connection such as DSL or Cable, and most CATV providers offer Digital phone. As for the outside of the home, you need to be able to connect them. Now, if you have Verizon Fios in your area, you may be in better luck.
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Old 01-27-2009, 11:10 PM   #11
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


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Originally Posted by kirridam View Post
theatretch85,

I'm attaching an image that shows the wires at the side of the house. It hasn't been connected to anything yet. Do you still want me to do it as you have mentioned above?

Thanks,
John
Looking back at your OP, it sounds like you may not actually have a telco box on the outside of your house; in which case you can buy your own box and install it where these wires leave the house and put your own lock on it if you choose. Since you won't have a direct connection to a telephone company, there won't be anyone else that will need access to this box other than you; and really once you tie all the wires together even you won't need to go back to it unless you have to trouble shoot some problems.

Anyway, you can buy your own demarcation boxes at the site below, these are pretty common/standard boxes so in the event you decide to switch to a land line telephone company in the future or future homeowners then the switch will be easy. Really all you need the box for at this point is a place to make the connection for your house wiring and to protect the connections from the elements.

http://www.hometech.com/hts/products...arc/index.html

Once you have a box to put it all in, you just need to connect the wires as I described earlier. From the looks of it, you have 8 wire cables there in that bundle, and being a new house i'd expect nothing less than cat5e cable being used for phones. If you are only dealing with one phone line, you should only have to worry about tieing all the blue pairs together and you should be fine with leaving the others un-connected. You will have to connect the pairs and figure out if the jacks were actually wired to the industry standard color code (Blue Pair = Line 1, Orange Pair = Line 2, Green Pair = Line 3, Brown Pair = Line 4).

Also, the above linked website has weatherproof enclosures for a cheaper price than the demarc box which you could use to simply tie all your wires together and close up yourself for fairly cheap price. Then in the future a telephone company could install their own box and simply run one cable into your box to make the connection with the entire house without having to spend the money on a demarc box now that the phone company would provide anyway.

Let me know if you have any other questions, I am always glad to help when I can.
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Old 01-31-2009, 05:42 PM   #12
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


theatretch85,

I'm attaching an image of how the wires look.

First I tried connecting all the blue wires (I have 9 cables sticking out) and then I plugged in the phone line from vonage adapter to one of the phone jacks. Then I plugged in a phone to another jack, but I didn't hear any ring tone.

What do I need to do? If you notice (see picture), there are 8 wires in each cable. They are:
  1. Orange/White
  2. Red/White
  3. Brown
  4. Orange
  5. Blue/White
  6. Green/White
  7. Green
  8. Blue

Also can I get something at Lowes/Homedepot that would allow me to connect the wires together. Initially when I connected all the blue wires from all the 9 cables, I twisted them together. Unfortunately that broke some of the blue wires!

Any help would be greatly helpful.

Thanks,
j
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:07 PM   #13
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You might have to open the phone jacks in your house to see how the installers wired them up, Line 1 SHOULD be the Blue pair, and Line 2 should be the orange pair. Yes Home Depot has whats called a 66 block and would be ideal for multiple phone jacks with multiple lines. Check out the wikipedia link below for more information about the 66 blocks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/66_block

The 66 block is typically more advanced and for a novice home user it can be a little difficult to install and wire up, the 110 block are typically easier to terminate (like on the back of a RJ45 network jack or patch panel). Otherwise in the phone/data aisle there are 3 wire crimps that you can use to crimp all the wires together, with 9 pairs you'd need quite a few of these 3 wire crimps.

Normally all the phone wiring goes to a location inside the house, not outside to the demarc point; it's odd that all your wiring goes directly outside.

At this point if you've connected all the blue pairs together and no link, id suggest opening the two jacks your working with and see how the installer wired the connections to the jacks. I suspect he used some non-conventional method to wiring the jacks and that's probably why it's not working for you right now. I would hope that he would wire all the jacks in the house the same, so theoretically you should be able to open just one jack and see how it's wired and the rest should be the same.
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Old 02-01-2009, 07:57 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by theatretch85 View Post
You might have to open the phone jacks in your house to see how the installers wired them up, Line 1 SHOULD be the Blue pair, and Line 2 should be the orange pair. Yes Home Depot has whats called a 66 block and would be ideal for multiple phone jacks with multiple lines. Check out the wikipedia link below for more information about the 66 blocks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/66_block

The 66 block is typically more advanced and for a novice home user it can be a little difficult to install and wire up, the 110 block are typically easier to terminate (like on the back of a RJ45 network jack or patch panel). Otherwise in the phone/data aisle there are 3 wire crimps that you can use to crimp all the wires together, with 9 pairs you'd need quite a few of these 3 wire crimps.

Normally all the phone wiring goes to a location inside the house, not outside to the demarc point; it's odd that all your wiring goes directly outside.

At this point if you've connected all the blue pairs together and no link, id suggest opening the two jacks your working with and see how the installer wired the connections to the jacks. I suspect he used some non-conventional method to wiring the jacks and that's probably why it's not working for you right now. I would hope that he would wire all the jacks in the house the same, so theoretically you should be able to open just one jack and see how it's wired and the rest should be the same.
I checked almost all the phone jack and they are using only the blue/white and blue wires. All the other wires are not being used. See attached image.

So does it mean that I have to connect all the blue/white wires from all the 9 cables together and all the blue wires from all the 9 cables together?
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Old 02-01-2009, 08:12 AM   #15
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Voip Over Regular Land Line


Yes. You answered your own question. Now to turn them into Networking Jacks, you will have to get new wallplates and Keystones & wire those accordingly, with a Router, Switch & Patch panel on the other end.

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