Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-07-2007, 03:07 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 264
Share |
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


My dumb thought for 11/7:

In my approx 6'x10' breezeway between the garage and the house there's a wall mounted baseboard heater about 36" long. I don't have it turned on right now, but it's getting colder outside so I'll probably be firing it up.

There's a knob on one side to control the heat, but it's something like "Low-Medium-High" and not terribly precise I imagine.

I've done a bunch of wiring with relays and PLC's and stuff in the past. How about running 24V control to a regular thermostat in the breezeway that would turn a relay on and off to control the heat. I'm thinking I could get more accurate control that way.

OR should I just use it like the designer intended? (What fun is that?)

perpetual98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2007, 03:36 PM   #2
Member
 
47_47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Springville, NY
Posts: 1,426
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Most wall heaters and thermostats operate on 240 volts. This is not a living space, just a breezeway, you just need to take the chill off. I would leave it as is.

47_47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2007, 04:33 PM   #3
Electrician
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Connecticut, Litchfield
Posts: 2,015
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Yes, you can buy an electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat, which would probably just cost you more money than its worth, but I would still do it!
chris75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2007, 06:28 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 264
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by 47_47
I would leave it as is.
That sounds like good all-around advice. Most likely the easiest and best thing for me to do.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75
Yes, you can buy an electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat, which would probably just cost you more money than its worth, but I would still do it!
Now that sounds like a challenge. I like the way you think.
perpetual98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2007, 09:32 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 17
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


I have a related issue if anyone can help.

i have an uninstalled 750 watt 120 volt electric radiator.

it has no thermostat control on it....

Should I /can I
get a thermostat, and install it into the wall... tie it into an existing gfc outlet?

i may not be making myself clear, but I would prefer not to run a separate circuit for this radiator. It's in a laundry room that is only 7x13 feet. An add on to an old bungalow house. Wiring is updated
lee polowczuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2007, 11:44 PM   #6
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by lee polowczuk View Post
I have a related issue if anyone can help.

i have an uninstalled 750 watt 120 volt electric radiator.

it has no thermostat control on it....

Should I /can I
get a thermostat, and install it into the wall... tie it into an existing gfc outlet?

i may not be making myself clear, but I would prefer not to run a separate circuit for this radiator. It's in a laundry room that is only 7x13 feet. An add on to an old bungalow house. Wiring is updated

well , you can but for myself i will say it is not really good pratcial to use that way because let me point it real quick the washer is on and the heater is on you will load it pretty good when the washer is on i know most washer can run high as 12 amp [ that is true it will really put a load during spinning cycle ] and your heater draw 6 1/4 amp and get both on running it will be about 18 amp if this circuit on 20 amp circuit you may get by ok with it. as long you dont run the electric iron the same time.

Merci , Marc

I hope you are aware that the laundry room circuit have to be on it own circuit and sized to 20 amp as well. [ just let you know in case if not catch it ,, GFCI is fine ]
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2007, 09:14 AM   #7
Once fried, twice shy.
 
elkangorito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Thailand
Posts: 251
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Why would you want to heat your living areas according to the temperature in your "breezeway"? Seems a bit expensive to me unless your "return air" is in your breezeway.
__________________
Switchboard design engineer & Licensed Electrician (Australia).
elkangorito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2007, 09:24 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 264
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


I wanted a separate thermostat in the breezeway itself, totally independent from the house system. I was thinking of putting some Edge Flooring in the breezeway and they recommend temperatures above 60 degrees. My "baseboard" heater is for some strange reason about 36" above the floor. The breezeway itself has some pretty awful paneling and a horrible ceiling with a 4x48" fluorescent light fixture that is so bright with 2 of the bulbs out it could be used for terrorist interrogation. I will eventually gut the breezeway and sheetrock the walls and ceiling, ceramic tile the floor and generally upgrade the appearance completely. I'm thinking that the baseboard is small enough that it might be on regular 120V voltage, but without ripping into it (which I've been too lazy to do thus far) I don't know for sure.

Or instead of going the transformer/relay route, I guess I could just put a thermostat in there. Google is a wonderful thing...

http://www.smarthomeusa.com/ShopByMa.../TH115-A-240D/
perpetual98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2009, 02:25 AM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Yes, you can buy an electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat, which would probably just cost you more money than its worth, but I would still do it!
I'm an electrical novice. Help me out here with a few more specifics. My heater is a 220 heater with no internal thermostat. I have 220 wired to the heater. When you say, get an "electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat" what specifically am I looking for? Do I go into the local electronics store and ask them for an electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat, and they will know what I'm talking about? I have the low voltage wire to the baseboard heater, but obviously (now) nothing to wire it to.
db3iii is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2009, 10:47 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 272
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


Quote:
Originally Posted by perpetual98 View Post
Or instead of going the transformer/relay route, I guess I could just put a thermostat in there. Google is a wonderful thing...
Quote:
Originally Posted by db3iii View Post
I'm an electrical novice. Help me out here with a few more specifics. My heater is a 220 heater with no internal thermostat. I have 220 wired to the heater. When you say, get an "electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat" what specifically am I looking for? Do I go into the local electronics store and ask them for an electric heat relay, and install a low voltage T-stat, and they will know what I'm talking about? I have the low voltage wire to the baseboard heater, but obviously (now) nothing to wire it to.
Umm, yeah... what you both need is simply a line voltage thermostat, rated for your particular electrical rating. If your heater is 240V, make sure your t-stat is good for it (just ask!), same for 120V.

Available at HD, Lowes, and many hardware stores.
__________________
Willis
williswires is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 11:57 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Default

Using a thermostat/relay to control baseboard heater


I only have 220 to the heater. Then a low votage thermostat wire from the heater to a remote wall. Just got everything buttoned up and painted and really don't want to dig into walls again. I can't believe they don't make a internal thermostat that could be controlled by an external thermostat, but I can't find anything by googling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by williswires View Post
Umm, yeah... what you both need is simply a line voltage thermostat, rated for your particular electrical rating. If your heater is 240V, make sure your t-stat is good for it (just ask!), same for 120V.

Available at HD, Lowes, and many hardware stores.

db3iii is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
York gas heater control board replacement spyvan HVAC 5 12-29-2008 07:12 AM
Water heater problem bear1957 Plumbing 23 11-01-2007 03:53 PM
Installing a tankless water heater ? bdalekid Plumbing 3 02-26-2007 07:26 PM
Baseboard heater Help! jweinstock Electrical 6 10-28-2006 04:01 PM
Periodic release from (I think) the T&P valve on the water heater alexz Plumbing 3 08-15-2006 10:31 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.