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Old 07-31-2009, 09:51 PM   #1
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


I want to use my Electric Dryer outlet (the big one) as a tap for power for my woodworking tools (my dryer is gas, so this outlet is unused). The outlet is 25ft from the breaker. I will tap there and put outlets about 25 feet away (can't get from the breaker to my tools).

My tools are 220V Single Phase (after I switch them from 120V). My new tool is 220V single phase only, so this is finally pushing me to get this done.

Anyway, that dryer outlet is 220V Single Phase, right (i.e. not 2 phase)?

If I can use it, what is the basic wiring plan? I do a lot of 120v without problems, but haven't done this. If it is the right kind of power, I can handle it safely with a little advise.

What size/type wire do I need? I notice orange and yellow outer sleves at the store.

Also would like to buy power cords that dangle from boxes in the ceiling. I can't find them. What do I search for?

-Mike

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Old 07-31-2009, 11:36 PM   #2
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


how many amps are your new tools? I assume you dryer outlet is 30 amps, and running 3 wires Is your new tool 30 amps or less? It would be just a matter of replacing the dryer receptacle with the correct receptacle for your tool, and Connecting ONLY the 240 volt conductors, (which will likely be the red and the black. Cap the UNUSED nuetral. that you wil now have in you old dryer plug. Replace the breaker in the panel with the correct size for the new receptacle you are putting in (if your tool is 15 amps or less, a 15 amp 240 volt receptacle, and 15 amp 2 pole breaker are needed. Just swap out the 30? amp dryer breaker with your new breaker.

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Old 08-01-2009, 10:17 AM   #3
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


Tony,

Thank you for the info, and I will go look at that wiki page.

I stated 220V (the molder that I am going to buy), you stated 240V? I have a saw that says, if rewired, it is 230V. I assume this is all the same???

The specs on the molder machine are:
*Motor: 2HP, 220V, single-phase, TEFC, 3450 RPM
*Amps: 12

I have 2 breakers hooked together at 30 Amps each. I intend to only run 1 big tool at a time, but could see a situation where my son would flip on another 12-15 amp tool by accident, or just do it if the circuit would hold during spin-up of the motor. BTW, I have a gas dryer, so the dryer will never use this circuit.

Because the washer took a dump 2 days ago, I am buying a new washer/dryer and will look inside the outlet later this afternoon. I would be tapping off the back (out through the garage) and then across a wall, then back into my basement.

Mike
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Old 08-01-2009, 11:16 AM   #4
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


220, 221 what ever it takes. (ha ha) line from the movie Mr. Mom. But seriuosly the voltage coming onto your house is in the range of 240 volts, so 240 is the more correct term. Does your panel have room for more breaker spaces? I ask this because you are talking of adding a second circuit for your son's tools. Your molder will require a 20 amp 2 pole breaker. So take out the 30 amp breakers your dryer was using, and replace it with the 20 amp 2 pole. Run a 12/2 cable from the 20 amp breaker to the device box you are going to put up for your molder to plug into (I assume the molder is being plugged in, not hard wired). Then get yourself a 15 amp 240 (220) receptacle and connect your 12/2 conductors to it. If your molder is to be hardwired, then you will have to mount a disconnect switch to connect you molder to instead of the receptacle. Now for your sons circuit. Run a 14/2 from your panel to a mounted device box. You wil have to determine if you require 120, or 240 volts for you son and put a breaker into the panel accordingly (1 pole for 120, 2 pole for 240). This can only be done if you have the space in your panel to add this extra breaker. If you DONT have the room, you will have to add a sub panel in your shop. Give me a bit more specifics, and I will post a diagram for you either way.

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Old 08-02-2009, 02:31 AM   #5
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


Tony,

I am running the 240 circuit because that is what the tool requires (plug in, by the way).

It would be nice to run a second tool on that circuit. Usually, it won't be at the same time, but I could forsee my son kicking on the table saw not thinking about the Molder running.

As for the table saw, it can be wired 240. Currently, at 120, if I am cutting a thick piece of wood and the saw bogs down, it pops the 15 amp circuit. I do have a dust vacuum running on a different 120 circuit without problems. I don't have many options for other power.

I can't get to the panel anymore. That end of the basement was finished years ago. That is why I want to tap out of my dryer (I use gas, so it is free). I can get from there, across the garage and back into the other end of the basement.

As I see my options:

Best: Run the molder off of 240 and the table saw at the same time.

2nd Best: Run the molder off of 240 and other tools off of 240, but not at the same time (realistically, I only need to run 1 at a time).

If I need, I could run a 2nd box at that end of the basement, but my only source of power would be from the dryer outlet (240). If the 2nd panel gives me a gain, I guess I would do it. I was thinking I would bring the 240 over to that side of the basement with 3 outlets and run tools (1 or more) off of it. In that case, I don't see why the secondary panel helps.

Mike
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Old 08-02-2009, 10:37 AM   #6
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


Hey Mike. proceed to this link, it has a diagram for your situation



Tony

Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 08-02-2009 at 11:09 AM. Reason: removed link
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Old 08-02-2009, 10:42 AM   #7
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


Tony, why would you post a reply to this thread on another electrical board?

That wouldn't be your own message board, would it?
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Old 08-02-2009, 11:01 AM   #8
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Use Dryer Outlet for Woodworking Tools


Lets simplify this some. Run a new cable or conduit from the panel to a new sub panel in the work area. Then you can run individual circuits for each tool. Or use several tools on one circuit. Some tools will have different plugs on them depending on the amp draw. This way you can install the correct receptacle for each tool you use. This is much better than tapping a circuit. If you are not familiar with the tap rules you could make for a dangerous install. You are a perfect candidate for a small sub panel in your work area. You could even install one big enough for future expansion. I would use a 60 amp minimum.

Think about the advantages of the sub panel. If you decide to go with one, we can help with the details.

Ps.....If you have a 30 amp circuit (breaker) and 4 number 10 wires for the dryer receptacle you can use this same cable or circuit for a small sub panel. This would be very easy and still give you some flexibility.
If this circuit is in metal conduit you can use the conduit for the ground wire. I would still pull four wires H-H-N-G.


Last edited by J. V.; 08-02-2009 at 11:14 AM.
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