Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-22-2008, 08:53 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 410
Share |
Default

Unique tools of the trade


I am finding the act of working with the wires in tight spaces more difficult than the concept. For example I know it sounds dumb but I seem to have an annoying time getting a good loop around the terminal screw on the Leviton GFI outlets where the screw "falls" back into the hole even when unscrewed all the way. Why do they do this?

One of the tools I have find really helpful are bent pliers. When twisting wires together the bent pliers are intuitive to a good twist of the wrist where straight pliers are not as easy.

What are some other tools that will really make my life easier as I'm getting to the point of wiring up all the outlets and switches.

pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 09:14 AM   #2
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Romex strippers.

__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 09:26 AM   #3
Power Gen/RS Engineer
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
Posts: 751
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
I am finding the act of working with the wires in tight spaces more difficult than the concept. For example I know it sounds dumb but I seem to have an annoying time getting a good loop around the terminal screw on the Leviton GFI outlets where the screw "falls" back into the hole even when unscrewed all the way. Why do they do this?
Hmmm, I'm having some difficulty seeing this. I pretty much use Leviton Prograde recepts exclusively. The ones that I'm used to actually have a compression clamp that is tightened down with the screw. With these, you don't loop the wire, you just strip 3/8" or so, insert straight behind the clamp and tighten down. The only annoying thing about these is that once you've loosened the screw/clamp, you have to invert the terminal to allow the clamp to open by gravity. Is this what you mean?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
One of the tools I have find really helpful are bent pliers. When twisting wires together the bent pliers are intuitive to a good twist of the wrist where straight pliers are not as easy.
Whatever you're comfortable with is great. I do a lot of electrical work and some time ago, I splurged on a set of Klein lineman's pliers which are great for twisting solid wires prior to nutting them. The jaws are nice and wide and serrated making them perfect for this task. I found that even a cheap lineman's plier wins over a regular plier any day. BUT, use what you're comfortable with!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
What are some other tools that will really make my life easier as I'm getting to the point of wiring up all the outlets and switches.
A stripping tool is indispensable but buy a good one. Even the Klein model that I bought was only $16 but it is reliable as all get out. FYI, it has a hole in the side of the jaw for making loops on solid wire as well as a bunch of other features which make it quite versatile.

I keep a drill motor chucked with a #2 phillips bit handy when doing recepts. It makes fast work of backing out the mounting screws (to get 'em out of the way so that I can run a few laps of electrical tape around the body/terminals). And it'll save your wrist when attaching the yokes to the boxes (I finish them off with a flat blade screw driver).
__________________
Well, now, there's what's right and what's right and never the twain shall meet.
BigJimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 11:21 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 410
Default

Unique tools of the trade


That is what I mean about the gravity. But, I read to always use the terminal screws instead of the rear entry slip-in deal.

However, now that you mention it, the reference suggesting NOT to use the rear entry thing looks like it was pointing to the outlets where the slip in used a spring mechanism as opposed to the screw down clamp. So maybe my concern is unwarranted with the Pro Leviton's
pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 11:41 AM   #5
Licensed Electrician
 
jrclen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: central wisconsin
Posts: 982
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Quote:
Originally Posted by pcampbell View Post
That is what I mean about the gravity. But, I read to always use the terminal screws instead of the rear entry slip-in deal.

However, now that you mention it, the reference suggesting NOT to use the rear entry thing looks like it was pointing to the outlets where the slip in used a spring mechanism as opposed to the screw down clamp. So maybe my concern is unwarranted with the Pro Leviton's
Yup, you are confusing the back stab with the back wired like Jimmy said. Most of us who do this for a living really like the back wired devices where the wire is not looped but is clamped tight with the screw. Those give a good connection and are fast. You learn to tip them to open the clamp.

The slip in back stab type where the wire is pushed in to a spring type clamp are best wired by looping the screw. Someday I think back stabs will be prohibited by code. They already are in some local and state codes. Missouri I believe prohibits back stabbing.
__________________
John
jrclen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 11:55 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,503
Default

Unique tools of the trade


I actually prefer this type of connection on receptacles as it is much faster and equally as good a connection.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 03:45 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Chicago IL
Posts: 73
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Back stabbing outlets is frowned upon almost anywhere you go. Alot of inspectors will fail a house if they find out there was back stabbing going on. GFIs on the other hand isn't exactly back stabbing like mentioned above. I agree with buying a good pair of wire strippers and a small screw gun. Also get a small straight edge screw driver for those trim plates and a small torpedo level that won't mark up the walls.
Super33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 05:20 AM   #8
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Quote:
Originally Posted by Super33 View Post
Back stabbing outlets is frowned upon almost anywhere you go. Alot of inspectors will fail a house if they find out there was back stabbing going on. GFIs on the other hand isn't exactly back stabbing like mentioned above. I agree with buying a good pair of wire strippers and a small screw gun. Also get a small straight edge screw driver for those trim plates and a small torpedo level that won't mark up the walls.
An inspector CANNOT fail you for using back stabbed devices. As long as they are UL listed, it is not against code to use them with 14AWG wire. The only way would be if there are local ammendments.
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 06:40 AM   #9
electrical contractor
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Georgia USA
Posts: 181
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Get yourself one of the receptacle installation tools( cant remember what they are called). You can get them at Lowes for about 10 bucks, helps alot when there are 2 cables in the box especially 12 gauge wires.
__________________
Jimmy

Life is tough, Life is tougher when you are stupid.
wire_twister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 09:15 AM   #10
Licensed Electrician
 
jrclen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: central wisconsin
Posts: 982
Default

Unique tools of the trade


Quote:
Originally Posted by Super33 View Post
Back stabbing outlets is frowned upon almost anywhere you go. Alot of inspectors will fail a house if they find out there was back stabbing going on.
Only if you are located in an area covered by a local or state amendment. Back stabbing is approved in the UL (or other agency) listing and thus acceptable under the National Electric Code. Inspectors aren't allowed to enforce things they simply don't like.
__________________
John
jrclen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 11:36 AM   #11
Sparrky
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 79
Default

Unique tools of the trade


many years ago I bought a big tool box then started filling it with each and every new tool and gadget I coud find . . .especially if it aides hand/arrm ergonomics or hand motion efficiences

the tool box is an 25 foot long GMC P-35 Step Van . .I even have an torque adjustable electric
wire nut driver to crank lots of wingees same torque every time and save these battered old wrists

you name it..if you are going to go career in this industry . .buy what makes life easier . .thank God for the insertable wall scope with extentions . . . .automatic wire strippers . . .circuit breaker tracers...testers . . .God I love the tools and gadgets

IN fact...I have been experimenting over the years with power tools that are ergonomically easier on our wrists . .maybe I'll desire a patent one day

Kingsmurf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone heard of COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC tools? VITAL Electrical 37 09-24-2012 08:54 PM
European 220v Tools use with US 220v Outlet dominator Electrical 20 08-02-2012 11:21 PM
Battery & Tools Compatability?? GilmoreD Tools 2 10-28-2007 06:24 PM
Value of used tools Texasguy Building & Construction 6 06-02-2007 11:03 AM
Bought tools today, good or bad deal? Mr. Michael Tools 3 02-13-2007 12:39 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.