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Old 01-07-2008, 05:36 PM   #1
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two multimeter questions


1. i have a, now fried, analog multimeter, can't recall the brand but it is the yellow, most commonly seen on in HD. any idea as to why it got fried ? perhaps because i had the voltage knob turned to an inadequate selection ?

2. should i go with a digital for my second one, which should hopefully outlive the first one ? any recommendations as to which one to get ?

thanks,

- a -

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Old 01-07-2008, 06:42 PM   #2
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two multimeter questions


Several things could have happened.
Measure ohms(resistance) on a circuit with power on.
Measure voltage on the amp scale
Measuring high voltage on a low voltage scale.

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Old 01-07-2008, 06:56 PM   #3
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Many pros consider the best to be manufactured by Fluke. Go with the autoranging type.

I have also seen decent meters (for the price) by Sears Craftsman. I have one of these and one by Greenlee in my toolbox.
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Old 01-07-2008, 09:02 PM   #4
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two multimeter questions


If you're going to use your meter on line voltage circuits be sure to get one with a Cat III rating. An el cheapo meter can not only be fried if it's used incorrectly, it can explode and seriously injure its user. I would suggest looking at the Fluke 114 or the Fluke T5. You may be perfectly happy with something cheaper than a Fluke, just stay away from the real bottom-of-the-barrel junk.
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Old 01-07-2008, 09:31 PM   #5
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two multimeter questions


yes, i was using it on my car for low voltage.
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Old 01-12-2008, 10:42 AM   #6
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two multimeter questions


On many occasions, there is a fuse inside the multimeter. Have you opened multimeter & checked to see if there is a fuse?

One of the most common problems with the older analog multimeters (which I prefer) is that people will switch it to the "Amps" setting & then put the leads across a battery (or something similar). This action will invariably blow the internal fuse.
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Old 01-12-2008, 11:30 AM   #7
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On many occasions, there is a fuse inside the multimeter. Have you opened multimeter & checked to see if there is a fuse?

One of the most common problems with the older analog multimeters (which I prefer) is that people will switch it to the "Amps" setting & then put the leads across a battery (or something similar). This action will invariably blow the internal fuse.
Agree, agree. You probably cleared the internal fuse which can be replaced. With the analog guys, it's much easier to inadvertently select a current function when the user intended to make a voltage measurement. It takes a little more work with many of the VOM/DVM's since you typically need to move the measurement lead from the volts/ohms jack to the current measuring jack.

While the Flukes seem to be the de-facto standard of the electrical industry (they are some of the best), you pay a premium for them. If you're an occasional user, that sort of investment may not be warranted. Also, there is absolutely nothing wrong with an analog-type meter and in fact, in the industry that I'm involved in (Railroad signaling), they are actually preferred. The analog needle movement can show things that a digital display will average out (coding for instance). Analogs by design will also load the circuit enough to prevent "capacitive lies" that digitals will tell under the right circumstances.

Good luck,
Jimmy
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Old 01-12-2008, 12:49 PM   #8
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Agree, agree. You probably cleared the internal fuse which can be replaced. With the analog guys, it's much easier to inadvertently select a current function when the user intended to make a voltage measurement. It takes a little more work with many of the VOM/DVM's since you typically need to move the measurement lead from the volts/ohms jack to the current measuring jack.

While the Flukes seem to be the de-facto standard of the electrical industry (they are some of the best), you pay a premium for them. If you're an occasional user, that sort of investment may not be warranted. Also, there is absolutely nothing wrong with an analog-type meter and in fact, in the industry that I'm involved in (Railroad signaling), they are actually preferred. The analog needle movement can show things that a digital display will average out (coding for instance). Analogs by design will also load the circuit enough to prevent "capacitive lies" that digitals will tell under the right circumstances.

Good luck,
Jimmy
Fully agree Jimmy.

I am an "analog" guy. The "needle" never lies whereas a digital display can do anything.

Before getting into electrical, I was a radio technician with the RAAF & back then, we only had analog "movement" type meters. I currently have a digital meter but cannot trust it as some of the LED segments tend to partially fail.

Whatever happened to the "good old days" when you had to actually think about what you were doing?
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Old 01-12-2008, 01:22 PM   #9
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Whatever happened to the "good old days" when you had to actually think about what you were doing?
Ha! I remember when I was first learning electronics, the hardest thing about using an osciloscope (I learned on tube-display) was finding the beam!

These days, you hand an analog to an inexperienced electrical person, and they're asking where the auto range button is!

All things aside, DVM's work just fine in many instances and I don't discount their usefulness and convenience. I mean, when was the last time you tried to fit a Simpson TS111 in your back pocket or tool belt!

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