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Old 03-23-2013, 10:30 PM   #1
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


I will be installing a new heated floor in my upstairs bathroom. The controller has built in GFCI. It will pull around 1/2 of an amp so it will be connected to the outlet in the bathroom, which will also be GFCI. Is this going to cause any issues? I thought I read on these forums somewhere that two GFCI's should not be on the same circuit...

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Old 03-23-2013, 10:35 PM   #2
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


Every heated floor I've installed has required its own circuit.

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Old 03-23-2013, 10:49 PM   #3
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


Yes but they were probably pulling much more amperage.

The two companies that I'm looking at using (suntouch and laticrete) both say that a unit this small can be used with the outlet.

It's only 3 sq. feet
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:49 PM   #4
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


the controller pulls 1/2 amp or the floor heater pulls 1/2 amp?
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:54 PM   #5
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


Ok, I have to ask, why would you heat a 3 square foot section of flooring?
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Old 03-23-2013, 11:35 PM   #6
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


A GFCI outlet has a line and a load connection. If you connect it to the line side, same connections as those powering the GFCI from the breaker, then you would not have the problem of one GFCI connecting into another GFCI.

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Old 03-24-2013, 07:43 AM   #7
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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the controller pulls 1/2 amp or the floor heater pulls 1/2 amp?
Actually it's less than 1/2 of a amp (0.4). I believe it's rated as a total system (controller + mat) but I will double check with the manufactures on Monday so we can be clear.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:54 AM   #8
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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Ok, I have to ask, why would you heat a 3 square foot section of flooring?
2 reasons actually;

1) It's still a bathroom floor.

2) I'm using very expensive tile and I don't plan on ever retiling it again.


I'm trying to plan ahead. I have a heated floor in the main bath and everyone loves it.

The upstairs has "limited" heat and the floors get very cold.

Anything I can do to make those 3 a.m. visits to the bathroom more pleasant is a good thing
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:04 AM   #9
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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A GFCI outlet has a line and a load connection. If you connect it to the line side, same connections as those powering the GFCI from the breaker, then you would not have the problem of one GFCI connecting into another GFCI.
OK THANK YOU Billy_Bob for helping address the question. I am also installing a new sub panel upstairs so I'll have to check to see if one or two lines were run to the bathroom. I just assumed everything (light, fan and outlet) were run on the same line but I'll have to double check that. If it's two lines then I can tap the floor controller off the fan/light. If not then I'll have to see if I can tap off the GFCI controller and install a standard outlet.

Is it code that the bathroom - has to - have an outlet, or can I just not install an outlet at all, and avoid the whole mess?
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:10 AM   #10
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_Bob View Post
A GFCI outlet has a line and a load connection. If you connect it to the line side, same connections as those powering the GFCI from the breaker, then you would not have the problem of one GFCI connecting into another GFCI.
Thing is though, this is NOT a problem.

There is no issue with one GFI protecting another, other than when it comes to troubleshooting a ground fault problem.
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:21 AM   #11
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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Thing is though, this is NOT a problem.

There is no issue with one GFI protecting another, other than when it comes to troubleshooting a ground fault problem.
To be fair, I looked up the specs on one of the manufacturer's products as the OP didn't give specifics, but it did say that there could potentially be a problem.

If it were me, I'd put it on a separate circuit especially if there was a chance this was going to be added to. Is this bathroom being remodeled? Are the walls open? Is this getting inspected?
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:27 AM   #12
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


If it's only .5 of an amp, put it on the lighting circuit, not on the receptacle circuit.
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:48 AM   #13
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


The OP will not get much room heating effect from the floor heat, but will remove the chill on the feet.
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:55 AM   #14
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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Originally Posted by k_buz View Post
I looked up the specs on one of the manufacturer's products as the OP didn't give specifics, but it did say that there could potentially be a problem.
A problem with what? I saw nothing indicated in any of their literature regarding the unit that we will be using. 99% of the mats used are much bigger than the one we are going to use. In-fact, I will be cutting the one that we have in half because even the 3x2 mat is too big. Here is a direct link to their information. If you can find any problems with the mat that we will be using (0800-3602-2) please let us know.

http://www.laticrete.com/Portals/0/d...ts/lds6050.pdf
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:14 AM   #15
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Two GFCI's on one circuit?


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The OP will not get much room heating effect from the floor heat, but will remove the chill on the feet.
THANK YOU Jim! Yes we are not trying to heat up the bathroom, just make it more comfortable when walking on the cold floor with bare feet



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Thing is though, this is NOT a problem.

There is no issue with one GFI protecting another, other than when it comes to troubleshooting a ground fault problem.
THANK YOU Speedy Petey! I did not know this. I thought that feeding one GFCI off of another would cause one, or both of the GFCI's to constantly trip or cause other issues. If it is just a trouble shooting issue than that is not a big deal to worry about.

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