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-   -   two GFCI outlets at bath vanity (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/two-gfci-outlets-bath-vanity-1477/)

Hickory 12-17-2005 01:30 PM

two GFCI outlets at bath vanity
 
I've observed that there are never enough outlets at the bathroom vanity. So I want to put a four-outlet box (that is, with two pairs of outlets) near the vanity in my new bathroom.

I'm aware that both outlets have to be GFCI protected, and I understand that on the load (non-supply) side, all the subsequent outlets will be GFCI-protected. So theoretically I could use one GFCI outlet and one standard outlet feeding off the GFCI. Correct?

For visual appeal, for the second outlet, I was planning to look for a device that resembles a GFCI outlet as closely as possible.

What do you think of that plan? Is there any benefit at all to putting in two GFCI outlets instead? Is there a better way to go about this?

Thanks!

-- Hickory (new member here - great forum!)

jbfan 12-17-2005 02:03 PM

Yes, the load side of the gfci does protect the downstream outlets. You can do what you want very easy. The closest thing to look like a gfci recepticle is going to be a decora recepticle. They are made square like the gfci's

mdshunk 12-17-2005 02:11 PM

You can certainly do the quad as you propose. I have also many times put a receptacle on each side of the vanity or basin. That often proves more convenient, depending on the layout.

Hickory 12-17-2005 03:10 PM

GFCI switch
 
Thanks for the prompt replies! The Decora looks perfect. There's no room on the other side for an outlet, but for our next bathroom, that sounds perfect.

Related question: Why do people protect outlets with GFCI, and not the wall switches? Or do they??

The wall switch is what the little ones with wet hands will be touching. Should I be protecting it with a GFCI as well?

Thanks again!

-- Hickory

donkey 12-17-2005 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hickory
Thanks for the prompt replies! The Decora looks perfect. There's no room on the other side for an outlet, but for our next bathroom, that sounds perfect.

Related question: Why do people protect outlets with GFCI, and not the wall switches? Or do they??

The wall switch is what the little ones with wet hands will be touching. Should I be protecting it with a GFCI as well?

Thanks again!

-- Hickory

Because you can't plug an appliance into a switch.You hands would have to be extremly wet but theoreticly it could happen.But it's much more of a likely situation to have an appliance fall into the sink or tub(people do stupid things) and get shocked (hair dryer=big amps) than by the switch.Thats why if you have noticed that things like hair dryers now come with their own GFCI's!Plus new code is bathroom GFCI's have to be on their own 20A dedicated circut so if you want to protect the whole bathroom you would either have to install a seperate GFCI on the feed before the bathroom(plug outside bathroom feeding switches) or install a dead front GFCI in the switch box that protects the switches.The dead front looks just like a GFCI but it has no outlet slots.It cannot be plugged into and acts like a remote GFCI breaker basicly.

Speedy Petey 12-17-2005 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by donkey
Plus new code is bathroom GFCI's have to be on their own 20A dedicated circut so if you want to protect the whole bathroom you would either have to install a seperate GFCI on the feed before the bathroom(plug outside bathroom feeding switches) or install a dead front GFCI in the switch box that protects the switches.

Ummm...no.
The code is one circuit can share all bath receptalces, even in multiple baths. (Not the best design and IMO a future code change waiting to happen).
If the required receptacle circuit is isolated to just one bathroom, it can serve any and all other loads in that bath. IE: lights, fan, etc.



The idea behind switches not needing protection is they are theoretically protected already. They are grounded.
Like was said, you can't plug in an ungrounded appliance into a switch. If there is a short inside the box the breaker will trip.

donkey 12-18-2005 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
Ummm...no.
The code is one circuit can share all bath receptalces, even in multiple baths. (Not the best design and IMO a future code change waiting to happen).
If the required receptacle circuit is isolated to just one bathroom, it can serve any and all other loads in that bath. IE: lights, fan, etc.

You misunderstood me.I meant the same as you just worded poorly.The circut is dedicated just to the bathroom GFCI's,i didn't mean every bathroom had to have its own circut.:)I was electrician for 9years in the DC metro area specializing in remodeling and renovations.The required circut i thought had to be 20A?I didn't realize you could put lights/fans on 20A circuts?Is it different if its isolated?


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