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-   -   Two Breakers for 1 Double Recepticle Box? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/two-breakers-1-double-recepticle-box-66355/)

mfleming 03-09-2010 01:11 AM

Two Breakers for 1 Double Recepticle Box?
 
Hi.

I want to install two single pole 20A breakers and have 1 #12 wire go to 1 20A receptacle inside a double Box.

I know code requires only 1 breaker per junction box but can I do either of this two prevent the issue of someone only turning off 1 of the 2 breakers when servicing the junction box.


1. Have my two Single Pole 20A breakers connecteced together (I'm assuming you install a pin throught the holes on the two switches to tie them together. (1st Option)

2. If there is no way to connect two single pole breakers and make them into 1 so if one blows they both turn off, is to install a double pole 20A breaker both into the same bus (so it won't be 220) and have the 2 wires go from there to Receptacle A and the other wire go to Receptacle B.



I need this extra power requirement for an office space building and working on computers. (typically my computers all run 400 to 1200W each, this is why I need 20A circuit and space limitations require the double box.

This is in Canada, residential


Thanks

kbsparky 03-09-2010 06:36 AM

The easiest way to accomplish this is to install a multi-wire branch circuit, and use a double-pole breaker.

But, it appears you want both of these circuits to be fed from the same phase or leg of your service. A couple of tandem breakers with a handle tie would work in this case. You will have to install a separate neutral conductor for each circuit in this scenario.

secutanudu 03-09-2010 06:38 AM

I am not sure abour Canadian code requirements. So please wait for someone who knows Canadian code to verify whether you can do any of the stuff I am about to write.

Here in the US, you CAN have two separate circuits in one J-Box. A good recommendation here is to clearly mark the wires and make sure the neutrals don't go to the wrong devices.



Maybe a MWBC (multiwire branch circuit) makes sense here? This is where you take a 3-wire cable, connect black to one breaker, red to another, and white to neutral. The two breakers must be on different buses (so, next to each other vertically). Then you tie the handles together with a handle tie.

brric 03-09-2010 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kbsparky (Post 411934)
The easiest way to accomplish this is to install a multi-wire branch circuit, and use a double-pole breaker.

But, it appears you want both of these circuits to be fed from the same phase or leg of your service. A couple of tandem breakers with a handle tie would work in this case. You will have to install a separate neutral conductor for each circuit in this scenario.

Ditto

joed 03-09-2010 09:38 AM

In Option two it sounds like you are only runing one wire for recepatlce 2 or did you mean one cable. You must run two separate cable if you want the breakers to be on the same. If there is not some specific reason for the same pahse then use a MWBC and a double pole breaker.
Don't forget you must use the 20amp T slot receptacles for a 20 amp circuit. Tamper resistant are also code now.

brric 03-09-2010 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 412026)
In Option two it sounds like you are only runing one wire for recepatlce 2 or did you mean one cable. You must run two separate cable if you want the breakers to be on the same. If there is not some specific reason for the same pahse then use a MWBC and a double pole breaker.
Don't forget you must use the 20amp T slot receptacles for a 20 amp circuit. Tamper resistant are also code now.

A 15 amp duplex is perfctly acceptable on a 20 amp circuit. A single recep would need to be 20 amp, not a duplex which is considered 2 receptacle. s.

joed 03-09-2010 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric (Post 412037)
A 15 amp duplex is perfctly acceptable on a 20 amp circuit. A single recep would need to be 20 amp, not a duplex which is considered 2 receptacle. s.


Not in Canada it isn't. The OP stated he is Canada. If it is a 20 amp circuit you must use 20 amp receptacles. They can be the T slots that take 15 amp devices or they can be the 20 amp only with the sideways prong.

brric 03-09-2010 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 412162)
Not in Canada it isn't. The OP stated he is Canada. If it is a 20 amp circuit you must use 20 amp receptacles. They can be the T slots that take 15 amp devices or they can be the 20 amp only with the sideways prong.

Sorry, not familiar with Canadian codes.

mfleming 03-09-2010 11:43 PM

Yes 1 -12/2 wire from a 20A single pole breaker into Recepticle A and 1 -12/2 wire from a 20A single pole breaker into Recepticle B.

Both receptacle A & B are in the same junction box WITHOUT a divider.

I have looked into it more and YES you must use a double pole breaker or tie the two single poles breakers together.

Can someone send me a link to a picture that has this "connector/tie" it would be for a Federal Pioneer if it matters.

Thanks

brric 03-10-2010 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mfleming (Post 412415)
Yes 1 -12/2 wire from a 20A single pole breaker into Recepticle A and 1 -12/2 wire from a 20A single pole breaker into Recepticle B.

Both receptacle A & B are in the same junction box WITHOUT a divider.

I have looked into it more and YES you must use a double pole breaker or tie the two single poles breakers together.

Can someone send me a link to a picture that has this "connector/tie" it would be for a Federal Pioneer if it matters.

Thanks

Your configuration would not require a double pole breaker or handle ties although it might be a good idea. Unless it is a Canadian requirement.
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pro...cd5e46_100.jpghttp://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:c...c/IMG_3039.jpg
It looks similar to this.


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