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-   -   Three outlets not working after heavy storm (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/three-outlets-not-working-after-heavy-storm-51356/)

yummy mummy 08-20-2009 10:43 PM

Three outlets not working after heavy storm
 
There was a really bad storm, a lot of lightning and we heard a very loud sound in our back deck, at which time the TV went off and the desktop computer went off.

We then discovered that there are three outlets that have no power to them.

We have called the electrician to come and take a look in the morning, but I am curious as to what could have happened?

Also, the desktop computer is not working, and there is power to the outlet that it is plugged in.

Did my computer get fried............:laughing:

Scuba_Dave 08-20-2009 10:49 PM

Lightning strike?

Is there a GFCI somewhere?

yummy mummy 08-20-2009 10:52 PM

The three outlets are in the kitchen/family room. Yes there are GFCI outlets on the kitchen counter backsplash.

yummy mummy 08-20-2009 10:53 PM

My husband check the breakers and none are tripped.

BCSparkyGirl 08-21-2009 01:23 AM

did you reset the gfci's?

Thurman 08-21-2009 02:44 AM

On your computer: you may be one of the lucky people whose computer has an internal fuse which may have blown. My son's 'puter went out during an electrical storm and we just went with the option that it had gotten "fried". Later a friend of his who knew about this took the cover off and found that only an internal fuse had blown. Fuse replacement fixed that one. As far as the outlets not working: It could be possible that one or more of the GFCI outlets in the kitchen would also feed the outlets in the kitchen/family room, so YES check all of the GFCI outlets may have been tripped during this storm. Good Luck, David

kbsparky 08-21-2009 03:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 317240)
There was a really bad storm, a lot of lightning and we heard a very loud sound in our back deck, at which time the TV went off and the desktop computer went off. ...........

Is there an outside outlet on that back deck? Possibly a GFCI type? Check to see if it has fried.:huh:

yummy mummy 08-21-2009 08:27 AM

Thank you, thank you, thank you, all you wonderful folks here.

Yes, it was the GFCI outlet on the deck that needed to be reset.

You guys and dolls are the best.......:thumbsup:

As far as the computer, I will try and see if it is a fuse inside.

Love ya all.

kbsparky 08-21-2009 01:32 PM

That noise you heard outside on your deck was the GFCI receptacle tripping out. Glad you can reset it, without having to replace it. :thumbup:

OK, it would seem that you are running your computer on a GFCI protected circuit. Betcha a dollar to a donut you have a surge power strip with that computer? :huh:

Power strips can shunt surges to ground, and when they do, a GFCI will sense the imbalance in the circuit and trip out. During a lightning storm, you would more likely have surges present as well. :whistling2:

BCSparkyGirl 08-21-2009 02:25 PM

yep, woulda loved that service call.......glad you were able to fix it yourself.

yummy mummy 08-21-2009 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kbsparky (Post 317420)
That noise you heard outside on your deck was the GFCI receptacle tripping out. Glad you can reset it, without having to replace it. :thumbup:

OK, it would seem that you are running your computer on a GFCI protected circuit. Betcha a dollar to a donut you have a surge power strip with that computer? :huh:

Power strips can shunt surges to ground, and when they do, a GFCI will sense the imbalance in the circuit and trip out. During a lightning storm, you would more likely have surges present as well. :whistling2:

That was one loud crack sound that it makes. I did not realize that the GFCI tripping makes such a loud sound.

As for the computer, by surge power strip, do you mean that bar that has all the outlets on it? What I did was change that power bar, as I thought it was not working and I put in another one, but that does not work either. The outlet does work, and the funny thing is that the modem works, the router works, the printer works, and the monitor works, but not the desktop tower. It won't turn on.

Is there something inside that tower that might have gone out? Do they have fuses in there?

Thanks for your help.

Thurman 08-21-2009 04:53 PM

As I stated, some computers do have an internal fuse located within the tower. I have seen three (3) of these now, my son's included. The fuses I have seen are the little round, glass, type fuses. The one in my son's computer was less than one amp, something like .3 amp, they had to go to an electronic supply store to find it. Using all safety procedures, take the case off and inspect all of the circuit boards in the back of the unit, that's where I have seen them, down under something so it's hard to see of course. You're doing good so far, get this problem solved and we'll send you you're DIY License. :thumbup: Good Luck, David

BCSparkyGirl 08-21-2009 05:02 PM

it may have taken out your power supply on the tower. They can be taken out quite easily by spikes and surges, which is why you should not cheap out on surge protection bars. The ideal system they preach about in school is having it on a ups system, but this can get costly, just make sure you invest in a good quality surge protactor, and during a lighting storm, shut off and unplug your comp, just to be on the safe side.

yummy mummy 08-21-2009 08:01 PM

I am going to try and see if I can open the computer and see if I can solve this.

I want that licence Thurman.

westom 08-23-2009 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 317469)
As for the computer, by surge power strip, do you mean that bar that has all the outlets on it? What I did was change that power bar, as I thought it was not working and I put in another one, but that does not work either. The outlet does work, and the funny thing is that the modem works, the router works, the printer works, and the monitor works, but not the desktop tower. It won't turn on.

Surges seek earth ground. Either you earth a surge before it can enter the building. Or surge energy hunts for earth ground inside the building. In your case, the surge found earth destructively through your computer.

First, to fix the computer, you must establish, using numbers, what is and is not damaged. Anything else can act strangely if the power supply system (more than just a power supply) is not first known good. That means 30 seconds measuring voltages on six colored wires.

Second, earthing one 'whole house' protector means that surge would not have entered the building. Such devices are sold by companies with better reputations - Siemens, Square D, General Electric, Leviton, and Intermatic are but a few. The Cutler-Hammer protector sells in Lowes for less than $50. Of course, no protector provides protection. Protection is provided by earth. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground which is why your building earthing must both meet and exceed post 1990 National Electrical code.

Third, that power strip protector did exactly what its manufacturer's specs claim. It provided no protection. Worse, it may have provided a path that bypasses protection already inside the power supply. It may have earthed the surge destructively through motherboard.

But first you must establish that the power 'system' is functional. Lights can glow and fans spin; and the power system can still be defective. Only a meter can report the power 'system' as good. Almost all damage never leaves visual indications.


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