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Old 06-06-2012, 10:04 PM   #16
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


Isn't anybody concerned the wiring is 14awg and the op just wants to feed them with a 20A breaker? Maybe not the intent but if you rewire all wire has to go to 12awg. Don't take a shortcut and leave any 14 in the walls.


Last edited by curiousB; 06-06-2012 at 10:07 PM.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:29 PM   #17
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
The reason for having multiple circuits is pretty simple. If you plug a 12 amp vacuum cleaner into one outlet on the circuit, and a 5 amp device into another outlet on the same circuit, you are close to blowing the breaker. If you have a lot of permanent devices on the circuit, like computers, lights etc., you are going to have to be very careful to avoid overloading the circuit. Not dangerous, just a pain.
Also consider the future - is it likely we have more electronic gizmos in 10-20 years or fewer?
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:35 PM   #18
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


If you're tight for space in your box, consider the "thin" style of breaker. Two fit into one slot.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:41 PM   #19
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Originally Posted by kevinp22 View Post
Also consider the future - is it likely we have more electronic gizmos in 10-20 years or fewer?
Actually they will either become more efficient, along with lighting. Right now, home loads have actually decreased by 15-28 percent than what they were ten years ago. Figure in 10-20 years, we are probably looking at being at least 35-52 more efficient than ten years ago from now.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:41 PM   #20
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Originally Posted by kevinp22 View Post
Also consider the future - is it likely we have more electronic gizmos in 10-20 years or fewer?
Power demands per circuit may in fact diminish in the future rather than increase.
LED lighting could lead the way, and electronic integrated circuits with minimum power requirements could lessen requirements also.
Probably hair dryers and electric blankets are most likely be the big power consumers. Even these may lessen, with improved technology.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:48 PM   #21
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Thanks all! But I still don't get it. Why is it better to split up the rooms on two or three circuits for receptacles only? Why is this something an inspector might suggest, even if the anticipated load of the receptacles is well within the capacity of a 20-amp circuit?
One thought is that if one circuit trips there will still be power in the room thus lessoning the possibility that the HO will run an extention cord and not call a professional. As for 20A circuits to the bedrooms, it is commonly found in larger homes. Some architects will even go as for as specifying that the minimum wire size shall be #12, which means the entire home has to be wired in #12. ALso by using 20A general lighting circuits, each circuit can supply 800 sq ft versus 600 sq ft for a 15A general lighting circuit.
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Old 06-06-2012, 11:04 PM   #22
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Originally Posted by bottlerockett View Post
Thanks all! But I still don't get it. Why is it better to split up the rooms on two or three circuits for receptacles only? Why is this something an inspector might suggest, even if the anticipated load of the receptacles is well within the capacity of a 20-amp circuit?
No idea, but I myself would wire all 3 bedrooms on a 15 amp circuit... planning is the key though, if i knew I wanted AC units in each bedroom, well then I would plan for it, so its more to it than just whats needed now, but the future plays a small part in your layout as well.
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Old 06-07-2012, 03:30 PM   #23
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


Thanks all. I'm going to see if I can split the three rooms on two circuits. So I'll have one circuit for overhead lights in all three rooms, and two other circuits for the receptacles in the three rooms. All circults will be 12# and 20 amp on arc fault breakers.

someone mentioned using thin breakers that accomodate two circuits, and I'm using such a breaker for bathroom/laundry circuits, but I've never seen an arc fault "thin" breaker.
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Old 06-07-2012, 03:33 PM   #24
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Three bedrooms on same circuit?


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Originally Posted by bottlerockett View Post
but I've never seen an arc fault "thin" breaker.


doesn't exist, standard breakers only

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