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Old 05-22-2012, 10:43 AM   #1
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


I have a GE main panel and am running 12 gage R,B,W,G wires out to a shed outside. I know I need GFCI, is there an alternative to have titled breaker in my main panel? These are real hard to find.

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Old 05-22-2012, 10:46 AM   #2
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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I have a GE main panel and am running 12 gage R,B,W,G wires out to a shed outside. I know I need GFCI, is there an alternative to have titled breaker in my main panel? These are real hard to find.
Use a regular breaker and a GFCI Receptacle at the shed.

If you are trying to use the lesser burial depths in Col 4. of of T300.5, put the GFCI in house and run it to the shed. Of course any lifgts will be GFCI also.

I just noticed you said 2 pole, what are your plans for the circuit?


Last edited by Code05; 05-22-2012 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 05-22-2012, 10:47 AM   #3
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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Use a regular breaker and a GFCI Receptacle at the shed.
That would work if the OP is burying the wire deep enough.
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Old 05-22-2012, 10:58 AM   #4
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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That would work if the OP is burying the wire deep enough.
We need to know what the OP is doing with the circuit to come up with the best plan.
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Old 05-22-2012, 11:02 AM   #5
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


I want to have two circuits in the shed. One will power receptacles and lights, the other will be dedicated for use with an electrical heater. 20amps should be sufficient for both. I may also want to have a 220V outlet for a compressor I have.

Maybe the solution is to install something like this that may have a more readily available 20A GFCI breaker instead of having the GFCI breaker in the main panel?

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ec...&storeId=10051

This one might be better, it is plug in, above is bolt on.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ec...&storeId=10051

Last edited by smata67; 05-22-2012 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 05-22-2012, 11:11 AM   #6
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


I would go with a smal subpanel, but not use gfci breakers, but use a gfci receptacle at the first location.
If you think you are going to have the heater going and working out there at the same time, I would increase the circuit from 20 amps to 30 amps.
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Old 05-22-2012, 11:50 AM   #7
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


My understanding is that I will have two seperate circuits in the shed (one serving an outlet for a heater, the other serving general purpose outlets/lights), each rated at 20A, which should be plenty for what I am doing.

So, if I use metal conduit for the buried portion and bury 12" deep, I can have the GFCI in my load panel in the shed, rather than at the main panel? That way, I can go with any manufacturer breaker/panel and not be tied to having to get this hard to find GE breaker. I did find one at HD, but it says it is 2 1/4" wide, I believe mine take 2" wide only.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...&storeId=10051
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:01 PM   #8
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


Use a 2P 20A breaker, 12-3 wire (or maybe 10-3 if concerned of voltage drop), and two 20A GFCI receptacles. You can also wire a 240VAC outlet there with the MWBC for a 240VAC heater is that makes sense (2x voltage is 4x heater wattage). You might need a ground rod at the shed as well.
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:07 PM   #9
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


Would better to get the info about everything you need to run so you can do a load calculation a 240v compressor and a heater could take just about all you have with a 20 amp circuit.
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:34 PM   #10
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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Originally Posted by smata67 View Post
My understanding is that I will have two seperate circuits in the shed (one serving an outlet for a heater, the other serving general purpose outlets/lights), each rated at 20A, which should be plenty for what I am doing.

So, if I use metal conduit for the buried portion and bury 12" deep, I can have the GFCI in my load panel in the shed, rather than at the main panel? That way, I can go with any manufacturer breaker/panel and not be tied to having to get this hard to find GE breaker. I did find one at HD, but it says it is 2 1/4" wide, I believe mine take 2" wide only.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...&storeId=10051
Make sure you use RIGID pipe, not EMT. You are good on your depth at 12". Lighting does not have to be GFI protected, just receptacles. If you install a sub panel, you will need 2 ground rods and you will also need to keep the grounds and neutrals separate in the sub panel.
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:59 PM   #11
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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Use a 2P 20A breaker, 12-3 wire (or maybe 10-3 if concerned of voltage drop), and two 20A GFCI receptacles. You can also wire a 240VAC outlet there with the MWBC for a 240VAC heater is that makes sense (2x voltage is 4x heater wattage). You might need a ground rod at the shed as well.
This looks good, but I would want a load center so that if i trip a breaker, I do not need to go back to the house. So I would be putting a load center in between the panel and the GFCIs and I would have non-GFCI breakers in that panel. Would that panel need to be grounded? It is no big deal to me, just want to know if I need to get a rod.

I guess I'm about 75' to the shed and then will have the distribution wiring inside it (10x10), would I need to go larger than 12?EDIT: okay, based on this link for a voltage drop calculator, I should be ok.

http://www.nooutage.com/vdrop.htm

Last edited by smata67; 05-22-2012 at 01:06 PM.
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Old 05-22-2012, 01:14 PM   #12
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


I would seriously consider going with a circuit larger than 20 amps because if your 240v air compressor draws 15 amps and you plug in a space heater you will most likely be tripping a breaker.
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Old 05-25-2012, 01:29 PM   #13
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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Use a 2P 20A breaker, 12-3 wire (or maybe 10-3 if concerned of voltage drop), and two 20A GFCI receptacles. You can also wire a 240VAC outlet there with the MWBC for a 240VAC heater is that makes sense (2x voltage is 4x heater wattage). You might need a ground rod at the shed as well.
I've decided to go with sketch in Post #8 instead of installing a load center in the shed. I plan on 3 wire (12 gage R,B,W,G) THWN from the house to the shed about 30' away in rigid conduit at least 12" deep. I'll come up with the rigid into the shed and end up in a 2-gang box w/ the two GFCIs. One GFCI receptable will be dedicated 20A receptable for an electric space heater. The other GFCI will go on to feed receptacles around the shed perimeter as well as a switched light. Sound ok?
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Old 05-25-2012, 01:38 PM   #14
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


I would very much like to run rigid, but since it may require a custom cut and thread piece (does HD do this?), it could present problems. If I decide to use NM-U (12/3), I can place the two GFIs inside the house, bury at 12", and am good to go? It is 120V, I would have 20amp 2P breakers in the main panel. How would I come into the shed, will coming up through the floor be good enough? I might want to have conduit coming out of the ground, a service ell for looks, is that ok?
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Old 05-25-2012, 03:36 PM   #15
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THQP Double Pole 20A GFCI Wide Breaker


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I would very much like to run rigid, but since it may require a custom cut and thread piece (does HD do this?), it could present problems. If I decide to use NM-U (12/3), I can place the two GFIs inside the house, bury at 12", and am good to go? It is 120V, I would have 20amp 2P breakers in the main panel. How would I come into the shed, will coming up through the floor be good enough? I might want to have conduit coming out of the ground, a service ell for looks, is that ok?
Given this option, 2 GFCI receptacles before leaving the house and going underground, I will then have to run two 12/3 NM-U, one for each circuit?

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