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Old 01-04-2010, 03:24 PM   #1
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Thermostatically controlled fan


I have a south facing greenhouse attached to the side of my home here in Central Arizona. When I built the house I also brought duct work in the floor over to the wall next to the greenhouse with the intention of scavenging heat out of the greenhouse in the winter time. The heat in the green house regularly gets to around 120 degrees and the high here currently is around 55 with a low of around 25. I have no idea of the heat that might come out of that greenhouse but the objective is to have the living room at around 65 degrees at the end of the day. It probably starts out in the morning at around 45 or 50.

The current idea is to install a bathroom fan near the ceiling of the greenhouse and blow what heat might come out into the floor ducts to heat the living room - which is the first place the main duct comes through. Fan costs $15 at the local big box and a thermostat costs $20. Set the thermostat to cool so it comes on at say 100 degrees and I need it to go off when the temperature in the greenhouse drops a ways below that. The square footage of the greenhouse is approximately 125 sq ft and if there is too big a fan it will cycle way too fast. Therefor as a cheap experiment I was just trying to figure out how much difference a small fan would make before going in a little further.


Problem is the twenty dollar thermostat is not designed to turn on 110 circuit. I need advise on what kind of thermostatically controlled switch might work here or some other solution. Any advise would be sincerely appreciated.


Thanks in Advance!!
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Old 01-04-2010, 03:43 PM   #2
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Thermostatically controlled fan


Use a transformer to reduce the voltage (like is done in a furnace) and a "contactor" (relay) to switch the 120 volts.

How a relay works...
http://www.google.com/#hl=en&source=...c9c32d20fe6232
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Old 01-04-2010, 04:11 PM   #3
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Thermostatically controlled fan


You need a line voltage thermostat
let me google that for you
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Old 01-04-2010, 04:26 PM   #4
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Thermostatically controlled fan


Quote:
Originally Posted by wirenut1110 View Post
You need a line voltage thermostat
let me google that for you
That is so cool of a way to Link
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Old 01-04-2010, 04:32 PM   #5
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Thermostatically controlled fan


I stole it from Speedy Petey
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Old 01-04-2010, 05:00 PM   #6
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Thermostatically controlled fan


I want to thank you all for the suggestions and I really need to figure out how to copy the google script though I generally try to stay away from the big G for privacy reasons.

I have looked at straight line voltage base board heat thermostats but I need something that works like an air conditioning thermostat - as I want it to come on when the temperature in the greenhouse is high and turn off when the temperature cools off.

I think the idea of the Relay is a good one but don't know if I can figure out how to match the voltage of a switch to the voltage of a thermostat. I live out here in the sticks and only have a small HD and no one in there has the slightest idea of how to deal with this problem.

Maybe I need to visit the local HVAC dealer and see if they have something like that.

Thanks again,

Bill
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:11 AM   #7
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Thermostatically controlled fan


First of all, you are limiting your life and knowledge by not using search engines like google.com or yahoo.com!

These have the knowledge and answers to any project you want to do!

All about fans, relays, transformers, thermostats, line voltage thermostats, ratings, wiring, and on and on! All you need to do is search for the word. Or how to install thermostat. Or how to install fan. Or greenhouse fan. Or how do relays work. Etc.

If you are worried about privacy, go to the closest public library and you can use their computers for free.

Search google.com for the words internet privacy and learn about it!

Then I live in a rural area. The stores in my area many times don't carry the parts and products I need. So I search on google.com for the product, buy it online, then UPS/FEDEX delivers what I need to my doorstep. Cheaper and much more time saving than driving 2 hours to the big city! (And 2 hours back.)

As to the thermostats, you can get "old fashioned" mechanical thermostats which do not require any electricity to operate. They use a mercury switch on the inside. Same with line voltage thermostats. Some of these are 100% mechanical and need no power to operate. These would be the least expensive types.

You may have a wider selection of line voltage thermostats in Arizona because they use evaporative coolers there. They may have some which "turn on" when it gets to be more hot than the setting on the dial.

Up north, we use these thermostats for electric heating and these "turn on" when it gets to be colder than the setting on the dial.

Or you could use the low voltage setup with a relay, then use an air conditioning thermostat and a heating thermostat. Just wire to the mercury switch inside.

And with these, the mercury switch would have a voltage and amperage (wattage) rating. Typically around 24 volts for HVAC I think?

Also is this going to work? Might try just plugging in the fan for now and seeing if it will work. If yes, then set up the thermostats.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:46 AM   #8
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Thermostatically controlled fan


I want to thank you for the education, the encouragement and most off all for your effort to set this old guy straight. I sincerely appreciate it.

I’ve been on the internet since 1993 and started out using AltaVista when I was first online with a 28K dialup connection. I have used Yahoo for the last 12 years ever since I changed from my first ISP and lost my original email account.

Why I avoid Google is Google search is about making money - not primarily about giving you the information you need. The whole concept behind Google is to market the information they collect from you based on your searches. This is done both directly as for example, if you search for a specific keyword you will see a specific ad period every time you make that search and that advertiser will have paid up to a buck to Google if you click on that ad. The other issue is that Google never forgets. Think of this. Every Google search you ever made is saved along with your ISP address on a server somewhere. They are considered a third party so you don't even have any constitutional rights relative to your privacy. With the passage of the Patriot Act your info can be subpoenaed anytime and is accessible by the CIA, FBI, or probably even the local Department of Agriculture if they might want and I don't know if you were listening, but the Supreme Court this week dropped a case where it might have otherwise been illegal for a prosecutor to frame you. We are way beyond 1984.

You are certainly welcome to trust the whole system but I don't. As they say the cost of freedom is vigilance. So all things being equal I just try to avoid Google when I can. Now, I use Youtube regularly and sometimes post there and Youtube is a Google company so I particularly understand the implications of all that.

Anyway I had conducted extensive research on thermostatically controlled switches on the internet before I got the idea of posting on a forum.

I can tell you that I just didn't understand the implications of mixing line voltage and the need for a relay and there was nothing relevant about my specific application in any of my searches - even using google. As it was, I went over to the ACE in the biggest town around here and tried to find a transformer to match the line voltage of the thermostats and a relay that would respond to the 24 volt line voltage of the thermostat and close a 110 switch as per your suggestion. They had the transformer for $26 and the thermostat for another $25 or so but no relay.

While my ACE guy and I were talking about it, I happened to picked up an adjustable thermostat for a power attic vent which was $26. It's 110 straight through and was American made to boot.


I think that was the solution I was looking for.

Thanks again.
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Old 01-06-2010, 12:53 PM   #9
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Thermostatically controlled fan


Here, these will work, and are simple to set up.
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