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-   -   Thermostat Outlet (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/thermostat-outlet-165554/)

natetron66 12-04-2012 08:51 AM

Thermostat Outlet
 
In my garage, I have a heater plugged into an outlet(that I installed) however it does not have a thermostat, and I bought a electric baseboard heater thermostat. I want to be able to wire the thermostat so that it controls the outlet, essentially turning the heater off and on.

I have both the lead power coming in from panel, and the wire to the outlet both in a wall box already, on the opposite side of the garage. My thermostat has 2 black wires. I tried connecting one black from thermostat to hot coming in, and the other black wire on thermostat to hot on outlet and tied whites together, and grounds together. My thermostat displays nothing, and outlet is on all the time.

Can someone please help? :confused1:

Here are what I am working with:
Heater - http://www.build.com/comfort-zone-cz...light/p1716415
Thermostat - http://www.lowes.com/pd_225238-74493...%7C1&facetInfo

NiNe O 12-04-2012 09:21 AM

Not many can help you with the links you posted. A wiring diagram for both components will be needed.

natetron66 12-04-2012 09:25 AM

Here's the wiring for the thermostat:

http://pdf.lowes.com/operatingguides...64501_oper.pdf

The heater, is simply a 3 prong plug, that I want to plug into an outlet.

Dave632 12-04-2012 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by natetron66 (Post 1066089)
Here's the wiring for the thermostat:

http://pdf.lowes.com/operatingguides...64501_oper.pdf

The heater, is simply a 3 prong plug, that I want to plug into an outlet.

Did you press the temperature adjustment buttons on the front of the T-stat? (Instructions Step 3)

danpik 12-04-2012 09:49 AM

What kind of heater is this? This thermostat needs a resistive load to work.

natetron66 12-04-2012 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave632 (Post 1066099)
Did you press the temperature adjustment buttons on the front of the T-stat? (Instructions Step 3)

Yes, tried both buttons, and nothing displays. And outlet/heater is on all the time.

natetron66 12-04-2012 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danpik (Post 1066100)
What kind of heater is this? This thermostat needs a resistive load to work.

It is a quartz heater. Here's a better link to it:
http://www.hayneedle.com/product/com...FQyk4Aodk3AA0w

jmd87 12-04-2012 09:59 AM

Your thermostat link isn't working for me for some reason, but it sounds like what you're doing is correct (negating any electrical codes).

You should be able to get a simple line-voltage thermostat specifically made for electric baseboard heaters to work with this situation, assuming your wiring is correct:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/BRO...121204155651:s

rjniles 12-04-2012 10:01 AM

Sounds like the t-stat is bad. Your wiring as described is correct.

jmd87 12-04-2012 10:07 AM

If your thermostat is like this one: http://pdf.lowes.com/operatingguides...64501_oper.pdf

It sounds like you are hooking up the black (line) and the black (load) to your thermostat black wires, but the diagram shows black & white being hooked up to your thermostat. You are not powering your thermostat because you're not completing the circuit.

The line-thermostat I put in the link in my previous post would do what you want though (break the hot like a light switch)

Dave632 12-04-2012 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmd87 (Post 1066113)
If your thermostat is like this one: http://pdf.lowes.com/operatingguides...64501_oper.pdf

It sounds like you are hooking up the black (line) and the black (load) to your thermostat black wires, but the diagram shows black & white being hooked up to your thermostat. You are not powering your thermostat because you're not completing the circuit.

The line-thermostat I put in the link in my previous post would do what you want though (break the hot like a light switch)

It's a simple 2-wire hookup, just like a light switch. The circuit is completed via the resistive load in the heater.

Bypass the thermostat and see if the heater works. If it does, then the thermostat must be bad.

chadmer 12-04-2012 10:43 AM

you need a licensed electrician to do that job for you call me

jmd87 12-04-2012 10:47 AM

You're assuming the heater he's using has a resistive load within the tolerances required by the thermostat:

"The thermostat cannot be used with the following:
a resistive load under 2 A
a resistive load over 12.5 A"

This is a unique installation and I think an analog (non-digital) line-thermostat would be more appropriate for this application.

I do agree the thermostat might be bad, but I personally wouldn't jump to that conclusion.


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