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Old 02-22-2012, 03:04 PM   #1
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thermal overload bypass elecctric motor


Please help,

I have a table saw motor with a broken thermal overload switch. I want to know how to bypass the thermal overload switch so I can see if the motor runs. The thermal switch has 3 wires to it. The motor is 110/220 and I think it is wired for 220 now.

Thank-you

Kerry

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Old 02-22-2012, 10:17 PM   #2
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What colors/numbers are the 3 wires?

One of the wires is one leg of the incoming power, one will disappear into the stator (the windings), the other is capped if the motor is dual voltage and connected for the higher voltage. Otherwise, it is spliced to another wire that goes to the stator.

If one wire is capped, simply splice the other two, and the motor will run if it's any good. If all 3 are in use, the motor is connected for the lower voltage. Splice all 3 together to bypass the overload.

Be careful with a tablesaw with no overload protection on the motor. Even if you're careful you'll very likely burn up the motor at some point if it has no overload protection.

Separate overload protection is available, it is used with motors that have no protection built in.

Robi

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Old 02-22-2012, 10:25 PM   #3
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Do you know what brand motour you have in there ??

Some case you can order a replacement thermal switch.

Otherwise a manual motour starter with overload protection will be next best item to use.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 02-23-2012, 02:54 PM   #4
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What colors/numbers are the 3 wires?

One of the wires is one leg of the incoming power, one will disappear into the stator (the windings), the other is capped if the motor is dual voltage and connected for the higher voltage. Otherwise, it is spliced to another wire that goes to the stator.

If one wire is capped, simply splice the other two, and the motor will run if it's any good. If all 3 are in use, the motor is connected for the lower voltage. Splice all 3 together to bypass the overload.

Be careful with a tablesaw with no overload protection on the motor. Even if you're careful you'll very likely burn up the motor at some point if it has no overload protection.

Separate overload protection is available, it is used with motors that have no protection built in.

Robi
Thank-you very much. I spliced all 3 wires and the motor ruins good on 110. Does the fact that all 3 wires were connected to the thermal overload button mean the motor is definitely wired for 110. Haven't used it in years it had a 110 plug on it but I had thought it was wired for 220.

I want to use it to power a conveyor we're making to get washed out sand from a broken waterline from the basement of a small hotel we are renovating. Our funds are extremely limited. Is there a simple and economic way to slow the RPM and increase the torque. The motor is a 1 HP Baldor Industrial motor 3450 RPM 12.6/6.3 Amps 60 HZ 1 PH Wiring diagram shows 1,2,3,4,5,8 & J wires.

Thank-you again for your help. We are up in Canada in Armstrong in the Okanagan Valley. If there is any carpentry advice We could give or Canadian hospitality you are welcome to it.

Sincerely, Kerry email kgkorberg@gmail.com
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:30 PM   #5
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thermal overload bypass elecctric motor


The only way to know if it's connected for 115 or 230 is to look at how the wires are spliced.

If it's connected for 230 and 115 is applied, it'll run fine with no load attached. It'll produce about 25% of its nameplate HP.

If there's no diagram, post back and I'll figure it out. The lead numbers you gave are not standard for a single phase dual voltage thermally protected motor. But with a bit of thought........

Rob

P.S. There's no way to slow it down without burning it up.

Last edited by micromind; 02-23-2012 at 09:42 PM. Reason: added P.S.
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:56 PM   #6
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Ok, now that I've thought this over, I'm going to make a guess that the overload is built into the terminal box, and not the motor itself. I'll also guess that one end of wire #J is soldered to the overload.

If so, you can remove the overload completely. You'll be be left with 6 wires going into the motor.

There are 4 possible connections here, two for voltage and two for shaft rotation. Here they are;

1) For 115 volts and CW shaft rotation facing the back of the motor, connect one of the incoming power wires to 1,3 and 5. Connect the other incoming power wire to 2,4 and 8.

2) For 115 volts and CCW shaft rotation, connect one of the incoming power wires to 1,3 and 8. The other goes to 2,4 and 5.

3) For 230 volts and CW rotation, one of the incoming power wires goes to 1. 2,3 and 5 splice together. The other incoming power wire goes to 4 and 8.

4) For 230 volts and CCW rotation, one of the incoming power wires goes to 1. 2,3 and 8 splice together. The other incoming power wire goes to 4 and 5.

Rob
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:14 AM   #7
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thermal overload bypass elecctric motor


If you end up having to use another motor and this is enough of a speed decrease, look for a 1725 RPM. Of course there are also gear motors and pulley's but we don't know enough about your setup.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:12 PM   #8
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Mircomind., I did check with my motour chart and it seems it is right for NEMA format and I did cross refered to my IEC chart ( yeah we do have few dual voltage single phase motour as well ) it came out almost the same.

To OP.,

Anyway what Micromind expaining to ya that pretty much hit on the spot with connections.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:38 PM   #9
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Mircomind., I did check with my motour chart and it seems it is right for NEMA format and I did cross refered to my IEC chart ( yeah we do have few dual voltage single phase motour as well ) it came out almost the same.

To OP.,

Anyway what Micromind expaining to ya that pretty much hit on the spot with connections.

Merci,
Marc
The one that I had to think about a bit was the J wire along with the standard 6 stator leads. usually, T1 is connected to the overload, not brought out and spliced.

Oh well, a good exercise anyway!
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Old 02-25-2012, 03:22 PM   #10
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The one that I had to think about a bit was the J wire along with the standard 6 stator leads. usually, T1 is connected to the overload, not brought out and spliced.

Oh well, a good exercise anyway!
Micromind,

Your advice was excellent. The motor was wired for 220.

Thank-you very much

Kerry

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