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Old 12-20-2013, 04:16 PM   #16
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Switching from electric to gas range


OK, OP here. I took a look at my circuit mapping spreadsheet. Here are the existing circuits that apply to the kitchen.

1. 50A dedicated to electric range.

2. 20A supplying four countertop GFCI-protected receptacles. These serve microwave, fridge, blender, coffee maker, toaster oven, mixer, and food processor (obviously not all at once). Circuit also feeds two 15A duplex receptacles in my Dining Room.

3. 15A supplying Kitchen lighting (also all Master Bedroom lighting and receptacles).

4. 20A dedicated feeding one GFCI-protected countertop 15A duplex receptacle.

So, not perfect... but it's what's there. I'm guessing the above isn't quite code-compliant, especially with circuit #2 above feeding non-kitchen receptacles. It certainly doesn't give even distribution of small appliance receptacles amongst the two circuits, either. Nevertheless, it looks like circuit #4 is my best place from which to feed a new range receptacle, yes?


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Old 12-20-2013, 04:24 PM   #17
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Switching from electric to gas range


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Originally Posted by JKeefe View Post
OK, OP here. I took a look at my circuit mapping spreadsheet. Here are the existing circuits that apply to the kitchen.

1. 50A dedicated to electric range.

2. 20A supplying four countertop GFCI-protected receptacles. These serve microwave, fridge, blender, coffee maker, toaster oven, mixer, and food processor (obviously not all at once). Circuit also feeds two 15A duplex receptacles in my Dining Room.

3. 15A supplying Kitchen lighting (also all Master Bedroom lighting and receptacles).

4. Dedicated 20A feeding one GFCI-protected countertop 15A duplex receptacle.

I'm guessing this isn't quite code-compliant, especially with circuit #2 above feeding non-kitchen receptacles. Nevertheless, it looks like circuit #4 is my best place from which to feed a new range receptacle, yes?
Like stated before, pull that 50 amp, pull out the wires for the range, make it a 20 amp circuit. Only if the range is four wire now, can you use it for a sub-panel, or dual fuel feed if needed up there later on, if you decide to go with a stove that uses gas for the oven, electric for the stove top, or vice-versa.

Personally with the way that the code has changed, and how some areas are, there is no problem with using a GFCI outlet for the circuit, that is feeding the location for 120volt service for the Gas Stove.

Only two items in my Kitchen that do not have GFCI protection, is my disposal, and my fridge. That is getting changed this coming Summer, when I wrap up my Kitchen remodel, which has been going on to four years now.
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Old 12-20-2013, 05:35 PM   #18
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Switching from electric to gas range


I like a nice clean friendly thread.
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:56 PM   #19
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Switching from electric to gas range


I'm basically going off a Wiring for Dummies kind of education, but I was under the impression that code typically requires a dedicated circuit for any permanent appliance, and a 9.5amp range surely qualifies... Right? I don't know, there are many smarter people on here than me, but if you're going for code compliance you'd probably be best to crack into your local code and find out...
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:00 PM   #20
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I'm basically going off a Wiring for Dummies kind of education, but I was under the impression that code typically requires a dedicated circuit for any permanent appliance, and a 9.5amp range surely qualifies... Right? I don't know, there are many smarter people on here than me, but if you're going for code compliance you'd probably be best to crack into your local code and find out...
It depends on what the appliance is, along with location, that determines it.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:03 PM   #21
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Switching from electric to gas range


Unless the instructions call for a dedicated circuit the stove can share a circuit.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:04 PM   #22
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I like a nice clean friendly thread.
Thank you.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:13 PM   #23
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Switching from electric to gas range


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Unless the instructions call for a dedicated circuit the stove can share a circuit.
Someone mentioned that they couldn't locate an installation manual online. I have had similar success. In the "ask & answer" section of LG's web page for this range, someone requested the installation manual, and the response from LG was that there wasn't one because installation needs to be performed by a qualified professional. I guess the professional needs to have ESP. Perhaps I'll call LG to clarify this issue. Let's proceed under the assumption that no dedicated circuit is required.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:41 PM   #24
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Switching from electric to gas range


Call a local mom & pop appliance store. LG is one of the worse companies to deal with. You could also try a site like Repair clinic.com, or one of the others.

Some of us have some excellent search engine Kung fun. Post the model# and we can see what we can dig up for you.
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:46 PM   #25
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Switching from electric to gas range


LSRG309ST. It was linked in the spec sheet, first post... I'm trying to keep things as simpel as possible here (I understand this isn't necesarily straigtforward given the possible variables involved).
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:49 PM   #26
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Like stated before, pull that 50 amp, pull out the wires for the range, make it a 20 amp circuit. Only if the range is four wire now, can you use it for a sub-panel, or dual fuel feed if needed up there later on, if you decide to go with a stove that uses gas for the oven, electric for the stove top, or vice-versa.
Well, many other people mentioned tapping one of the existing 20A kitchen circuits...

Current range wiring is 3-wire plus ground. I think I am going to leave this in place, because it is simpler to do so.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:10 PM   #27
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Switching from electric to gas range


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Well, many other people mentioned tapping one of the existing 20A kitchen circuits...

Current range wiring is 3-wire plus ground. I think I am going to leave this in place, because it is simpler to do so.
I would do the same. Attach the existing outlet to the wall if there is enough slack. Otherwise if not, just pull it out of there, and pull 8/4 & 12/3 into the wall cavity, and mount both the 240v & 120v boxes in there.

Go with the 20 amp, because you never know what may show up there in the future, or if you decide to branch that outlet into a coup!e more to serve counter top space.

I have nothing but 20 amp circuits servi ng my Kitchen & dining outlets. There are times that we have the counter top microwave, portable dishwasher going, and the wife decides that she wants to plug in the crock pot on the other counter, with the coffee pot on that same outlet, and on the counter by the stove, mix up a batch of cookies.

It is always nice to have the outlets all be 20 amp circuits in those cases, when you are having a sports get together, or fixing a meal,and having something in the steam cooker and crock pot.

On the segway, when I redid our bathroom, my wife made me put in an outlet to the left of the sink, vs just the single gfci on the right by the sink.

She made me do the same with the Kitchen remodel by the stove. One outlet on the left by the light switches, and one in the middle of the 36" countertop space, same for to the right of the stove, along with an outlet below where a small 18" long workstation will be, that is on the dining room circuit, since it is a baseboard outlet.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:13 PM   #28
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Switching from electric to gas range


Its a gas range. You have two choices:

Run a new circuit or tie into another.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:31 PM   #29
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Switching from electric to gas range


Don't do it.
A gas cooktop might be nicer than electric, but gas ovens are terrible.
My wife wants to rip ous out and I am sympathetic.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:33 PM   #30
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You'll find gas ovens in every commercial kitchen. Consumer reports says electric ovens are no better than gas. Dual fuel ranges are not in our price range. Our current electric stove takes 20+ minutes to boil a large pot of water. This is not a relevant part of this discussion.

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