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Old 12-20-2013, 08:08 AM   #1
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Switching from electric to gas range


I am likely getting a gas range as a Christmas present. We currently have a an electric range. I'm wondering what I need to do to the electrical system to be ready for the gas range.

The new range's electrical requirements are 9.5A @ 120V (see spec sheet here if necessary: http://www.lg.com/us/appliances/pdf/...spec_sheet.pdf).

The current electric range is served by a 50A receptacle on a dedicated circuit. The receptacle is located just above the kitchen floor behind the range. Picture below.


In the main panel this line is connected to a 50A double-pole circuit breaker. I believe red and black are connected to the breaker. White goes to the bonding bar. The sheathing on the cable running from the main panel in the basement to the kitchen is labelled "Type NM 600V E10816F (UL)". I'm not sure what gauge this is, but obviously it's heavier than 14 or 12.

Here are photos of main panel. The range breaker is the second one from the top on the right.



The house also has a sub-panel installed just to the left of the main panel. Here is an image of the sub-panel.


I will be getting a plumber to run gas to the range location. I want to take care of the electrical myself so everything is ready to go when the gas is ready. I figure there are two possible approaches here:

1. Leave the 50A dedicated circuit in place. Turn off the breaker to this circuit when new range arrives and typically leave it off. Run a new dedicated 15A circuit to the range location using 12/2 NM (I assume I need a dedicated circuit for the range). This would require a new circuit breaker, which I understand from my electrician is not an easy thing to get for my panels.

2. Somehow adapt the in-place 50A wiring for a 15A or 20A receptacle, which would involve removing the current 240V receptacle and adding a 120V receptacle. I don't know if something like this is possible.

Your advice is appreciated.

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Old 12-20-2013, 09:05 AM   #2
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Switching from electric to gas range


Go with a whole new 12-2 circuit with a single pole 20 amp. breaker, not 15 amps.
You could remove the wires from the double breaker, cap them off and mark the line with a tag.
The old line and receptacle could be left in place, or the wire pulled back down under the floor and put in a metal junction box with a cover and mark on the cover what it was for.
No reason to pull all the old wire.
The new outlet wiring really should be run up inside that wall.

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Old 12-20-2013, 09:16 AM   #3
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Switching from electric to gas range


As for the gas piping, find some mom & pop shop, not one of those with the largest advertisement in the Yellow pages. You might get lucky with Craig's List, but with that I would make sure that they hold a state license.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:26 AM   #4
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Switching from electric to gas range


Isn't there a 120V receptacle on the wall above where the current electric range sits? A dedicated circuit for the new gas range is not necessary if a receptacle is within reach without using an extension cord.

Last edited by hammerlane; 12-20-2013 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:29 AM   #5
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Switching from electric to gas range


do you know what model stove you are getting? check the manual (they are usually online) and that will tell you if you need a 15 or 20 amp circuit.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:09 AM   #6
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Switching from electric to gas range


Quote:
1. Leave the 50A dedicated circuit in place. Turn off the breaker to this circuit when new range arrives and typically leave it off. Run a new dedicated 15A circuit to the range location using 12/2 NM (I assume I need a dedicated circuit for the range). This would require a new circuit breaker, which I understand from my electrician is not an easy thing to get for my panels.
Ayuh,.... Just turn the breaker Off on the range plug, 'n leave it alone,...
Someday, Somebody might want an electric range again,....

Yer New gas range just needs electrical power for the clock, timer, 'n possibly the igniters,...
Just run a branch off the existin' circuit that services the kitchen now, for it,...
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:24 AM   #7
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Switching from electric to gas range


hammerlane has the right idea, especially if you have a legacy panel where breakers could be hard to find. on the other hand, if the area beneath the stove is an unfinished basement, might be easier to run a new circuit rather than bust up walls in the kitchen to tie into an existing sabc.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:30 AM   #8
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Switching from electric to gas range


The gas range specs specifically state 9.5 amps. so some investigation of what is on each kitchen circuit would be necessary to make the decision. Add the possible numbers, microwave, coffee pot, toaster oven, refrigerator, possibly more etc. to know where you stand on load.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:39 AM   #9
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Switching from electric to gas range


Those brown Cutler-Hammer breakers should be easy to find. They are still the current style.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:45 AM   #10
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Switching from electric to gas range


OK, let's answer/address your comments/questions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
The new outlet wiring really should be run up inside that wall.
Agreed. If I run a new circuit and/or install a new receptacle, I will put it in the wall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
As for the gas piping, find some mom & pop shop, not one of those with the largest advertisement in the Yellow pages. You might get lucky with Craig's List, but with that I would make sure that they hold a state license.
I've worked with a local plumber before. I'm happy with him and we've discussed in the past the ease with which he could put gas in the kitchen, so I plan on calling him again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hammerlane View Post
There is not already a 120V receptacle on the wall above where the current electric range sits? A dedicated circuit for the new gas range is not necessary if a receptacle is within reach without using an extension cord.
There is a 120V receptacle over the counter to the right of where the range is, not directly above. I would prefer not to plug the range in there because I don't want an ugly cord running over the edge of the countertop and I want the receptacles available for other appliances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by itsnotrequired View Post
do you know what model stove you are getting? check the manual (they are usually online) and that will tell you if you need a 15 or 20 amp circuit.
I linked to the spec sheet for the exact model range under consideration. Requirement is 9.5A @ 120V as I said in my first post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
It would fall under the SABC rule due to it is a Kitchen, so automatic 20 amp branch circuit. It is also required to be GFCI protected under current rules.
If the requirement is that any appliance circuit in the kitchen is 20A, then obviously I need 20A.


My basement is finished but there is a suspended ceiling, so all of the electrical down there is accessible. With some homework I'm sure I could branch off of one of the existing kitchen circuits and install a new GFCI receptacle behind the range location, in the wall, without damaging the kitchen wall, because I could run the feed straight up from below. It may require an additional splice and junction box outside of the kitchen in the basement ceiling, but that's not a big deal. Is there no specific requirement to put the range on a dedicated circuit? If not, that makes things a lot more flexible. The range hood is currently on a 20A dedicated circuit; perhaps tapping off of that would be a good option. I will do the math at some point, but I'm guessing the circuit supplying the range hood has less load than the other kitchen circuits serving the microwave, fridge, and other appliances.

Last edited by JKeefe; 12-20-2013 at 10:47 AM.
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Old 12-20-2013, 11:00 AM   #11
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Switching from electric to gas range


Quote:
Originally Posted by JKeefe View Post
I linked to the spec sheet for the exact model range under consideration. Requirement is 9.5A @ 120V as I said in my first post.
ah, didn't catch the link at first. range has a convection element. i would argue that could not be installed on a sabc. i couldn't find an installation manual for your model but a 15 amp circuit should be fine, you don't need 20 amp.

edit: now i'm not so sure about not being able to put it on a sabc. code doesn't have an explicit limit on the size of the gas range load. i guess it would be okay.

Last edited by itsnotrequired; 12-20-2013 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:14 PM   #12
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Switching from electric to gas range


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
All the OP needs to do, is find out which SABC is not havily loaded in the Kitchen, and just banch off of that one on that wall, as long as it has a ground.
Ok, no problem. There is a ground.

I'm still curious; is there some reason I can't use one of the hots and the neutral in the 50A circuit to get the receptacle I need?
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:26 PM   #13
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Switching from electric to gas range


It will be cheaper to run a new circuit vs modifying the old.
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:34 PM   #14
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Switching from electric to gas range


Quote:
Originally Posted by JKeefe View Post
Ok, no problem. There is a ground.

I'm still curious; is there some reason I can't use one of the hots and the neutral in the 50A circuit to get the receptacle I need?
the biggest issue is that you won't be able to find a 15 or 20 amp receptacle that can terminate the existing conductors on the 50 amp circuit. you'll need reducing lugs or connectors or similar to connect the existing #6 conductors (assumed) to the #14 or #12 you'll need for the new receptacle. unlikely that will all fit in a single gang box. you'll need to do the same thing at the panelboard and install a single pole 15 or 20 amp breaker for the circuit.
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Old 12-20-2013, 02:41 PM   #15
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Switching from electric to gas range


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
It will be cheaper to run a new circuit vs modifying the old.
If the existing is easily accessible, is grounded, it would be easy and cheaper. As long as they do not have just two 20 amp circuits, feeding all outlets in the Kitchen, I see no problem with just pulling a feeder for an old work box for behind the new gas stove.

When I designed out the branch circuit for the wall that my gas stove is on, I used one 20 amp circuit for that wall. It is feeding three countertop outlets,and the outlet for the 120 volt feed for the gas stove.

This is probably the easier part of the project for the OP. I really do not see why some are dragging it out, and making it a bigger deal than it is. It is just adding one outlet for the stove. The OP is not planning on rewiring the whole Kitchen.

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