Switches On Opposite Side Of Wall - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical


CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By joed
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-20-2016, 05:54 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 187
Rewards Points: 174
Default

Switches on opposite side of wall


My intent is to wire two switches in a space that's split in half by a wall; I'll use a 2gang box on one side of that wall for some lights in that section. Then I'll use a single gang box on the other side offset by ~3inches or so as to not butt up against the other box BUT there's wires running down the stud I was planning on using. Can I run the wires over the outside of the junction box and let them continue downward to their receptacle?

http://i.stack.imgur.com/7QhfR.jpg

http://i.stack.imgur.com/xWvVL.jpg

Doesn't seem right but not sure how else to work around this??


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Advertisement

tb582 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 06:53 PM   #2
Usually Confused
 
lenaitch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Central Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,774
Rewards Points: 1,694
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


I'm not aware of a rule that prevents running outside of the box (but a pro might) BUT you are supposed to secure the cable within I think 1' of the box (like the cable running down from the 2-gang) so that creates a problem unless there is an exemption. Depending on how you plan on finishing that wall there is a general rule that cable must be protected from physical damage.

Advertisement

lenaitch is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 07:09 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 187
Rewards Points: 174
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by lenaitch View Post
I'm not aware of a rule that prevents running outside of the box (but a pro might) BUT you are supposed to secure the cable within I think 1' of the box (like the cable running down from the 2-gang) so that creates a problem unless there is an exemption. Depending on how you plan on finishing that wall there is a general rule that cable must be protected from physical damage.


Exactly - there's got to be others that run into the same problem how is it solved? I don't suppose it's OK to tack the wires onto the stud and then put the box over the wires?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
tb582 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 10-20-2016, 07:19 PM   #4
Member
 
hkstroud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 961
Rewards Points: 1,912
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


May I ask why your studs are oriented in that manner?

Since the single gang box will only contain a switch can you use a shallow box such as shown below.

Also why does the boxes have to be on the same side of the stud.

I believe the NEC rule is that the cable must be secured with in 8" of the box. However, I would not be too concerned about that. It is not flapping around in mid air.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by hkstroud; 10-20-2016 at 07:31 PM.
hkstroud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 07:24 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,928
Rewards Points: 46
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Around here, it's 6" IIRC. I'm not an electrician though.

Either way, you could secure the wires to the stud in the space between the boxes if you run out of the 1', or whatever distance. Then run the wires around the box, and secure them again above the top box. That would satisfy that rule.

(I've seen electricians do stuff like that before, but like I said, I can't quote electrical code.)

Cheers!
supers05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 08:16 PM   #6
Usually Confused
 
lenaitch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Central Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,774
Rewards Points: 1,694
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Way off topic (and apologies to the OP - hopefully you will get satisfactory answers to your problem) but I have seen debates on whether the 'staple to box' distance is a straight line or run-of-wire distance. It all boils down to whatever the inspector will approve, but I also agree it is not super critical, especially when you consider that fished runs aren't bound by the same rules.
lenaitch is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 08:49 PM   #7
Member
 
hkstroud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 961
Rewards Points: 1,912
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


I agree that it is what ever the inspector will approve. However, I don't think running a cable down a stud can be considered fishing it through a wall, that is passing a cable through the holes bored in studs.

I am very interested in why the stud are oriented the way they are. I assume that what we see is the end of the wall. Curious as to how the rest of the wall is going to be built.
.
hkstroud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 08:53 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 299
Rewards Points: 598
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Place a stacker staple on each side of the upper box and use the outermost tabs. It will secure the cables, keep them centered and away from the walls, and leave enough slack for them to go around the upper box.

Fishbulb28 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Fishbulb28 For This Useful Post:
lenaitch (10-20-2016)
Old 10-20-2016, 09:19 PM   #9
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 13,038
Rewards Points: 12,872
Blog Entries: 11
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Not sure if what you propose is OK or not but you could drill through the stud and run the cables up the other side.
lenaitch likes this.
joed is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2016, 11:41 PM   #10
Member
 
hkstroud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 961
Rewards Points: 1,912
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Quote:
you could drill through the stud and run the cables up the other side.
The only problem with that is, if I understand the environment correctly, the other side of the stud is the exposed end of the wall.
hkstroud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2016, 07:55 AM   #11
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 13,038
Rewards Points: 12,872
Blog Entries: 11
Default

Re: Switches on opposite side of wall


Quote:
The only problem with that is, if I understand the environment correctly, the other side of the stud is the exposed end of the wall.
Then drilling would not work.

Advertisement

joed is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need Some Advice About A House With An Issue neutropia General DIY Discussions 7 01-29-2017 06:46 AM
Replacing retaining wall in front of old wall - options? dc300m01 Landscaping & Lawn Care 2 07-04-2016 09:43 PM
Connecting Ceiling Light/Fan. Multiple Switches. One switch box with three cables. AlpineB Electrical 7 04-12-2016 12:19 PM
GFCI outlets on other side of wall Tetranitrate Electrical 7 07-15-2011 08:06 PM
Open channels down each side of bonus room gable end wall from attic? fdecker Building & Construction 4 11-17-2010 04:28 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

 

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1