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Old 11-03-2008, 09:31 PM   #1
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


I have almost completed the installation of the upgraded service in my older home and have installed a new meter socket, ran new 2/0 conductors from weather head to socket and drove in a new ground rod running #4 copper from the ground terminal in the meter socket to the rod.

Now my next question, here's a pic of the new panel I placed inside, which is back-to-back with the meter:



My question is, what's the best way to support the panel when there is a slight gap on both sides of the studs? Should I place a spacer there and then screw it in? I have to be sure the edge of the panel is flush with the finished wall so that I can install the cover on it properly.

Next question, since the panels are back-to-back of each other, I have used a 3" rigid metal nipple conduit to connect them and have used plastic bushings to protect the conductors from insulation damage. Now, I have read that its better to use the metal grounded bushings on the ends and connect the ground to the panels on their respective sides.

Will that mean I need to install the metal ground bushings in place of the plastic ones, and connect the related ground wire to the panels (called bonding)?

One last question, after the new service is installed, is it common or uncommon to energize the new panel before installing the new breakers? Some electricians say yes, some say no. The main would be off of course before setting them in, but since my house needs a rewire (have alot of old rubber-insulated wire thats worn away) and will need to connect a temporary outlet to the panel until the job is complete. And in my county I do not have any inspectors nor am I required to obtain any permits.

What are your thoughts? Thanks for any help!


Last edited by AVTechMan; 11-03-2008 at 09:35 PM.
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Old 11-04-2008, 06:27 AM   #2
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


Use some thin wood strips to fur out the stud to the side of the panel.

You cannot just use the plastic bushing to connect the nipple to the panel. The bushing are used in conjunction with the metal locknuts.

Even with the main breaker off there are still live parts in the panel that you can contact either with your hands or the wires as you cut them into the panel.

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Old 11-04-2008, 07:06 AM   #3
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


Jim Port- I believe the OP is referring to the special metal bushings that have the grounding lug attached and have the plastic insert in the center to protect the wires as you pull them through the conduit.

Like this:
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Old 11-04-2008, 07:27 AM   #4
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


If you do install a temp outlet, any knockouts knocked out must be blocked again.
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Old 11-04-2008, 01:07 PM   #5
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by theatretch85 View Post
Jim Port- I believe the OP is referring to the special metal bushings that have the grounding lug attached and have the plastic insert in the center to protect the wires as you pull them through the conduit.

Like this:
This is correct. I already do have the locknuts in place with the plastic bushing behind it. I was referring to the special metal bushings with the ground lug for both sides in order to bond them together with the ground. My water line coming in the house is PVC and my meter is in the front yard near the street.
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Old 11-04-2008, 03:38 PM   #6
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Supporting an Indoor Breaker Panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by AVTechMan View Post
This is correct. I already do have the locknuts in place with the plastic bushing behind it. I was referring to the special metal bushings with the ground lug for both sides in order to bond them together with the ground. My water line coming in the house is PVC and my meter is in the front yard near the street.

You do know that you need to sink 2 ground rods, right?

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