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gp_wa 10-07-2008 01:55 PM

Subpanel in detached garage
 
Another subpanel thread, yay! Searched, didn't find.

Subpanel in a detached garage, fed from 100 amp breaker in main panel. Do I have to maintain ground/neutral separation back to the main panel, or do the ground rods take care of this?

jerryh3 10-07-2008 02:05 PM

Yes. Seperate the ground and neutral. You'll still need a ground rod at the garage.

gp_wa 10-07-2008 02:24 PM

Thanks.

Somebody said grounding (subpanels) is a complicated issue. Is there any condition where one doesn't have to maintain ground/neutral separation?

jerryh3 10-07-2008 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gp_wa (Post 169372)
Thanks.

Somebody said grounding (subpanels) is a complicated issue. Is there any condition where one doesn't have to maintain ground/neutral separation?

Yes, it's complicated. Yes, there are conditions where they aren't seperated, but not in your situation.

InPhase277 10-07-2008 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 169389)
Yes, it's complicated. Yes, there are conditions where they aren't seperated, but not in your situation.

Well, that actually depends on if there are any other metallic paths between his detached garage and the house (water lines, phone/cable, etc) and what code is in effect in his area. The 2005 code and earlier allows for a three-wire feed, with the neutral and EGCs bonded in the panel, and to a GEC. 2008 code has discontinued that practice. But, for safety's sake, I never like to use the three wire solution. So yes, use four wires.

Marvin Gardens 10-07-2008 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by InPhase277 (Post 169482)
Well, that actually depends on if there are any other metallic paths between his detached garage and the house (water lines, phone/cable, etc) and what code is in effect in his area. The 2005 code and earlier allows for a three-wire feed, with the neutral and EGCs bonded in the panel, and to a GEC. 2008 code has discontinued that practice. But, for safety's sake, I never like to use the three wire solution. So yes, use four wires.

I like the 4 wires also and do that on all my remote buildings.

Stubbie 10-07-2008 09:11 PM

Washington State has a statewide electrical code and it is mandatory that 4 wire feeds be installed to all panels load side of the service equipment to residential detached structures/buildings. Best I can tell this has been in effect as a state amendment to the NEC since 1999.


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